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matisme
post 5 Apr 2009, 18:14
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Hi
I am currently working on a Ďmodelí funicular railway for a science project (Iím I to science) I have made plans for the motor car and have started to mark it out on some brass sheeting. It is not a model railway just a working demonstration. But I wandered if anybody had done some thing like this before???

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Matt (matisme)


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post 5 Apr 2009, 19:29
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Well you could try looking here....

http://www.modelrailforum.com/forums/index...amp;#entry82532

Regards


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matisme
post 5 Apr 2009, 20:02
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Cheers
I have modelled an inclined plane in my last science project but have not built a rack railway yet
Thanks again
Matt (matisme)


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Piermaster
post 11 Apr 2009, 09:05
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Hi Matt,

Here's some funiculars I've visited to give you some inspiration:


Southend Cliffs Lift (currently closed for rebuilding).





Bergen Floibanen, Norway.


Ketchikan, Alaska.

Recommend you get yourself a copy of 'Cliff Railways of the British Isles' by Keith Turner, published by Oakwood Press, ISBN 0 85361 594 2

UK ones are:
Aberystwyth, Aviemore, Blaenau Ffestiniog, Bournemouth (3), Bridgnorth, Folkestone, Hastings (2), Llwyngwern, Lynmouth, Saltburn, Scarborough, Shipley Glen, Southend, Torquay, Wakefield, Windsor.

Dave



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dwb
post 11 Apr 2009, 09:13
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The one at Folkestone is a double - two sets of two tracks up and down. One side appears (as of last weekend) to be in a state of permanent disrepair. The other side is open on Sundays.

I also took some detail photos of a funicular in Heidleberg last summer. Here's one which shows the cable routing for a passing point.



David


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shedmad66
post 14 Oct 2009, 17:50
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QUOTE (Piermaster @ 11 Apr 2009, 09:05) *
Blaenau Ffestiniog,


Where abouts is it? Can't remeber seeing it last time i was up there.


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DIW
post 15 Oct 2009, 11:43
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OK, I admit it! I'm building a funicular too! smile.gif

I have experimented with the Brawa HO scale funicular set. It works well, and is a reasonable representation of a german funicular. Trouble is, it doesn't look at all like a Bernese (Swiss) one, which is a shame since my in-build layout (started the baseboards 3 years ago, only got the track down now) is set at Krattigen between Interlaken and Spiez.

A particular feature of the funiculars in the region is that they have bends - not just at the passing loop, but along the length of the run. A good example is the Niesen funicular, which has a S shaped route on the top section, and especially the Harder Kulm which bends through 90 degrees from bottom station to top. The Brawa only has the straight track sections, so I couldn't even use just the track from the set!

Extensive enquiries led me to the 3mm society, who were able to supply copperclad sleepers of the right width (2mm) and a track gauge for HOm through 3SMR.co.uk.

The most significant challenge though was finding a source for the unique wheelsets and pulleys for a funicular. If you look again at dwb's photograph of the passing loop at Heidelberg, you will see there are pulleys mounted at an angle to allow the cable to run around a corner without pulling out of the pulley. The angle-mounted pulleys at Heidelberg appear to have both flanges of equal height. The funiculars with which I am most familiar have a larger flange on the top side than on the lower. The wheelsets on the funicular wagons need to have the double flange on the wheel which runs to the outside of the passing loop, and a flangeless wheel to run to the inside - this flangeless wheel runs across the rail gaps which are there to let the cable pass through. I was fortunate to know of a friendly Model Engineer who was happy to produce these pieces to my sketches/drawings.

So. I have built the track, got (all?) the components needed, I just have to put it all together......it seems so simple when I write it like that!


Regards,

Dave

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PeterPug
post 15 Oct 2009, 11:54
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I've mentioned this elsewhere, but..
A friend of mine tells me there was one at Dusseldorf where he lives that used two locomotives that were linked so that the weights balanced (i.e. one was down while the other was up) using cables round a large wheel. I haven't been able to find anything on the internet about it....


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post 15 Oct 2009, 12:49
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QUOTE (dwb @ 11 Apr 2009, 09:13) *
The one at Folkestone is a double - two sets of two tracks up and down. One side appears (as of last weekend) to be in a state of permanent disrepair. The other side is open on Sundays.

I also took some detail photos of a funicular in Heidleberg last summer. Here's one which shows the cable routing for a passing point.



David


Thats a fascinating prototype. i asume its got a wide flangeless wheel one one side and a double flanged wheel on the toher. the 2 cars have the flanged wheels on alternate sides.

Very clever. i wonder how bumpy it is over the junction?

Peter


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dwb
post 15 Oct 2009, 17:23
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QUOTE
Thats a fascinating prototype. i asume its got a wide flangeless wheel one one side and a double flanged wheel on the toher. the 2 cars have the flanged wheels on alternate sides.

That would be my guess too. I have a photo of one of the vehicles but it's impossible to see the wheels.

QUOTE
Very clever. i wonder how bumpy it is over the junction?

It started to rain quite heavily when we were half way up so we took a ride down. I don't remember being jolted as we went through that section.

We seem to have developed a habit of getting rained on half way up mountains with funiculars. The same thing happened in Innsbruck this year.....

David




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matisme
post 15 Oct 2009, 20:22
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Well I finished the model..................

http://www.modelrailforum.com/forums/blog/...p?showentry=479

Cheers
Matt cool.gif


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Piermaster
post 16 Oct 2009, 09:47
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Well Done Matt,

Interesting project - I hope you are marked well for it.

I heard of a model of a water-balanced funicular that was built as part of a university thesis and has been exhibited - equally interesting as yours, but a lot messier!!!

Cheers,

Dave


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DIW
post 16 Oct 2009, 11:55
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QUOTE (dwb @ 15 Oct 2009, 18:23) *
QUOTE

Thats a fascinating prototype. i asume its got a wide flangeless wheel one one side and a double flanged wheel on the toher. the 2 cars have the flanged wheels on alternate sides.


That would be my guess too. I have a photo of one of the vehicles but it's impossible to see the wheels.



Your assumption is correct, see my earlier post regarding getting hold of such wheels for my model.



QUOTE (dwb @ 15 Oct 2009, 18:23) *
QUOTE

Very clever. i wonder how bumpy it is over the junction?



It started to rain quite heavily when we were half way up so we took a ride down. I don't remember being jolted as we went through that section.



The flangeless wheels are quite wide, much wider than the tread for a normal rail vehicle on a normal railway. This gives a smooth transition across the junction.

Many of the funiculars I have experienced do not have sprung suspension though, this means that every rail joint is felt! ermm.gif The junction transition is likely one of the smoothest bits of the track......... biggrin.gif


Cheers,

Dave


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post 16 Oct 2009, 12:05
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QUOTE (matisme @ 15 Oct 2009, 21:22) *
Well I finished the model..................

http://www.modelrailforum.com/forums/blog/...p?showentry=479

Cheers
Matt cool.gif



Hi Matt,

That's a super project. May I be so bold as to suggest that you have actually built a rack railway?

The rack type in your model is the Straub rack, (as opposed to Riggenbach, Abt, or the type used on Pilatus - the name of which escapes me for the time being).

Now, how about putting up some catenary....?

(OK, I can see the audience is glazing over, I'll shut up)

Dave
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matisme
post 16 Oct 2009, 19:43
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QUOTE
That's a super project. May I be so bold as to suggest that you have actually built a rack railway?


Yes...

Last year I built a counter weight type but I wanted some thing slightly different.....

Cheers
Matt
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