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> Hornby BR 0-4-0 Class 06 008 DCC Decoder Installation., My Hornby 2008 Club model alterations and review.
rascar
post 11 Jun 2009, 02:30
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Hornby BR Class 06 008 0-4-0 Diesel Shunter DCC Decoder Installation with a head light.

Well then, when we received this little BR Class 06 008 Diesel Shunter in Pullman Blue and White Livery as the 2008 Club Model, our main layout was DC and since then this little Diesel Shunter has seen approximately 20 hours of track time before we started converting track and stock to DCC. One could say nicely run in and time for a service.

From new, this Hornby example of the BR Class 06 has performed reasonably well and with the pristine Pullman livery, looks kind of quirky for a working shunter, an item that my lad adores. Niceties aside, for a working shunter, I did find it a little twitchy at low speed, making for interesting work at the yard and at high speed, well, like a rocket. To be honest, at high speed it leaves my Hornby Class 390 DCC Pendolino stunned in its draft, yet it does hold the rails.

Something I personally found a little odd was the top end speed, considering the speed is not at all relative in scale to the manufacturers top design speed of 28 mph for the Class 06 and 140 mph designed speed for the Class 390 Pendolino! Fun to run, but odd.

For actual pulling power under load, the power to weight ratio for traction is not quite right. At low speed, it struggles to shunt and when you give it a little more diesel, it spins like a stung Whippet on steroids. But it is a lot of fun, my son loves it equally and as such, this little engine is off to the yard (or should I say bench) for a strip down, clean up, a decoder installation and if space permits, a LED head light as well.

If you are going to attempt a project similar to this one, please read my disclaimer at the end where you will also find a short list of the parts and the tools that I used.


1. Seen here in pristine condition prior to stripping down. At the moment, the Locomotives gross weight is 3 7/8 oz or 112 grams.



2. The first trick is finding how to remove the body from the chassis and in this little number, the trick is to turn the locomotive upside down and start at the back. The cab is connected to the chassis floor with 4 little plastic clips. Take a good look at them and you will see that if squeezed ever so gently, the clips will release the cab and allow it to be carefully pulled up and away from the chassis.



3. With the rear cab off, the front cab may then be gently pulled back ever so slightly along the chassis and then lifted off.



4. The next trick was finding out how to get the chassis floor structure removed from the main chassis. It is held in place with 4 little plastic clips coming up from the chassis. Two at the rear and two at the front.



5. Once the clips are located, removal is easily achieved by gently squeezing in the two clips located below the cabin and near the worm and worm wheel. The chassis floor can then be gently lifted upwards and then slid gently forward to release the front clips.

It is at this point that I also noticed the chassis floor is a cast metal material, contributing to the additional weight of this model, possibly an attempt to correct the power weight ratio, minimising wheel spin?



6. With the chassis floor removed, the main chassis, motor, worm, worm wheel, wiring and capacitors are exposed. You can also see that the main chassis appears to be the same article used with some of the BR 0-4-0T steam models from the Railroad range. The main difference being that the chassis is turned around before fitting the body shell as evident from the location of the cylinders for the connecting rods.



7. Now, for future reference I take a little look at the motor and component locations.



8. You can see the motor retention clip here that will need removal so that the motor can be removed.



9. I found it much easier to use a small pair of needle nose pliers to remove the clip rather then my fingers.



10. Before removing the motor retention clip, I carefully pulled the capacitors away from the motor body, making room for the clips removal.



11. With the motor clip removed, I gently pry the motor from the motor chassis. Like some of the more recent Hornby Locomotives I have pulled apart, a black sticky goo has been used between the motor and motor chassis.



12. Then it was time to fire up the solder iron and with great care, remove all of the capacitors from the motor. Whilst the capacitors are a necessary requirement at time of manufacture that apparently assist in suppressing radio frequency interference with the Television etc, I felt that I did not need them on this locomotive.



13. With all the wiring and capacitors removed from the motor, I can now focus on the chassis wiring.



14. The Hornby R8249 DCC Decoder that I am using comes carefully stored to minimise the chance of contamination and static that may damage the decoder.



15. The standard R8249 Decoders come with a 8 pin plug for a plug and play type situation with a lot of the DCC ready locomotives. Out of the bag, the decoder is very exposed and due to the small size, almost impossible not to touch without causing potential damage to the performance. So the first thing that I do is temporarily protect the decoder with some electrical insulation tape.



16. Next, as this BR Class06 Diesel Shunter is not DCC ready, the pin / plug end of the decoder is of no use, so I snip the wires near the plug leaving enough wire on the decoder to work with.



17. You can see from this image that there is more than enough room to place the decoder above the motor. Some will debate that it is not a good location due to heat and lack of air circulation that will contribute to a greater build up of heat within a closed environment, but there is not a lot of other options other than the Cabin, which in this model is a reasonable location for it. But then I would have nowhere for the engine driver!



18. Having decided that the decoder can be mounted above the motor, I cut the Orange (for the right hand side of the motor) and Grey (for the left hand side of the motor) wires approximately 25mm or 1í from the decoder and then strip and tin the exposed wires, ready for soldering to the motor contacts.



19. With so much insulation in the chassis body of this model and no - connection to the motor body now that the capacitors have been removed. I felt it appropriate, rightly or wrongly to establish a connection to the motor body. So I removed the motor chassis that is held in place by one screw that is visible in the underside of the main chassis and carefully removed the right hand pickup. I then soldered a 20mm off-cut of resistor wire to the right hand pickup (black wire).



20. With the motor rolled over onto itís back exposing the motor contacts, I carefully solder the grey wire to the left side of the motor contact and the orange to the right. (Based upon my interpretation of the instructions that come with the Hornby R8249 decoder.)



21. Then I refitted the pickup with the motor body connecting wire back into the chassis and re-fitting the motor chassis so that the wire will make direct contact with the motor when it is re-installed.



22. With the motor chassis back in place, I then solder the red wire to the left side of the chassis pickup and the black wire to the right side of the chassis pickup. (Based upon the locomotive facing left when it is on the rails.) You can also see that I have used small pieces of heat shrink tubing to encase the soldered joint and prevent short circuits.



23. Now, with the motor turned over from its original placement, it is carefully fitted back into place ensuring that the worm and worm wheel align correctly.

It was at this time I thought of replacing the black goo with a piece of double side electrical insulation tape, but felt the black goo, for what ever reason it was placed there, was still in reasonable condition to reuse.



24. The next thing I do is lock the motor back into place with the motor retaining clip.



25. Then, before anything else, I give the little BR Class 06 shunter a test run to ensure I have not wired up the house by mistake.



26. After a successful test run, I then place a small 10mm or 3/8í square piece of double-sided electrical insulation tape onto the top of the motor body.



27. Next, I carefully unwrap the decoder from the protection of the electrical tape and gently stick it to the double-sided tape on top of the motor.



28. I then re-fit the chassis floor and give it another test run.



29. Pleased with the test run, I then check to see that there is still enough room around the motor, decoder and wiring to allow the installation of a fictional LED head light installation.



30. Having decided that there is plenty of room within the body for a 3mm led light, with a tiny 0.5mm steel drill bit, I go to work drilling out the top front of the body to allow light to travel through the hole and provide the fictional appearance of a front head light. PLEASE NOTE, that the location I have used for this light is not a typical location for front lights on a non-fictional Class 06, which are on the front left and right guards.



31. A 0.5mm hole is successfully drilled part way through the small box on the top front of the locomotive body.



32. Next, I drill another 0.5mm from the under side of the body into the little box until the holes meet, allowing light to travel freely through the hole. You can also see that I have stuck in place a small piece of double sided electrical insulation tape ready to stick the LED and wiring harness onto.



33. Then I carefully shape a white 3mm LED using small pointy nose pliers so that it will point into the hole when mounted into the underside of the train body. Then, using a small 1kΩ resistor, I carefully solder it to the LED + anode and then carefully solder the white wire from the decoder to the other end of the resistor. Next, I carefully solder the Ė cathode from the LED to the blue wire from the decoder. So that there is less chance of short circuits or crossed connections, I use heat shrink tube to protect the wires.



34. With the front LED wired up, I then stick the LED and wire assembly onto the double side tape so that the light is directed straight into that tiny 0.5mm hole and then stick a piece of black electrical tape over the light so that does not shine down onto the track, only up through the hole.



35. With spare function wires left over and plenty of space in the cabin, I decide that additional to the front light, I shall also fit a little cabin light for the drivers convenience.



36. So the first thing I do is prepare the internal cabin window box by sticking smack bank in the middle of the internal roof area, a double sided piece of electrical insulation tape so that I may stick the LED and wire assembly to it.



37. After fabricating another light set using a soft yellow 3mm LED, a 1kΩ resistor soldered onto the + anode which was then soldered onto the green function wire from the decoder. Then I solder on another piece of blue wire to the Ė cathode side of the LED and finally connect it up with the other blue wires from the decoder, I bend the wires with a small pointy nose pliers so that it fits neatly within the cabin.



38. After checking that the functions all work O.K. with my DCC control, I carefully clip the rear cabin back onto the chassis floor. With all the new components fitted, this little shunter now weighs in at a solid 115 grams or 4 ounces! So I am not confident that the additional 3 grams is going to improve traction..



39. There we have it. A final clean to remove any finger prints from the paintwork and we are ready for another test run.



40. On the track, a noticeable difference has been made to both the bottom end control and also the top end speed.

Whilst the bottom end performance is still not as smooth as I would like, it is far better than the DC control and as for the top end, well, let me say, it still outpaces the Pendo! As for the extra 3 grams of weight from the new components, well, you guessed it, a noticeable improvement in traction went unnoticed.

All in all, a nice and simple project that was a lot of fun.


Donít you just love that little head light smile.gif

Locomotive detail and parts used.

1 x Hornby BR 0-4-0 Class 06 008 Diesel Shunter finished in Pullman Livery.
1 x Hornby R8249 Decoder.
1 x White 3mm LED 20mA
1 x Soft Yellow 3mm LED 10mA
2 x 1kΩ resistors
1 x Small amount of solder.
5 x lots of short pieces of coloured wire
2 x small pieces of double sided electrical insulation tape
1 x Electrical insulation tape.

Tools used.

1 x Solid work bench.
1 x Nice bright work light.
1 x Solder iron with small point. Very HOT, so be careful!
1 x Fine gauge wire stripper.
1 x Sharp Knife.
2 x small pointy nose pliers.
4 x Blobs of Blu-Tack to hold the LEDs, resistors and wires in place for soldering.
1 x 0.5mm high speed steel drill bit.
1 x Charged Battery Drill (being better than a flat battery version).
1 x #0 Phillips head screwdriver.

DISCLAIMER.

Please note that I have heavily modified this locomotive from itís original manufacture and accordingly, accept that it is no longer possible for me to claim warranty for the product or any components I have used. If you are also considering modifying your model like I have, your models warranty may also be voided by the manufacturer. You should also be aware that I am not a trained model engineer and any reference, calculation or example I have made within this example of my work, may not be correct. As such, I will not take any responsibility for any work you may undertake in modifying your model, damage you may cause to yourself, property, the model or for the end result, be it good or bad.

Extreme care should be taken as moments of amazement and or frustration may be experienced and potentially dangerous tools may be used that can cause serious harm and damage. PLEASE BE CAREFUL. unsure.gif

Cheers,
Darrell


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Richard Johnson
post 11 Jun 2009, 03:29
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*** Nice tidy work Darrel, and well presented. The only thing I might have added is a little extra weight - perhaps another 100 grammes of stick on tyre balance weights cut into small pieces and distributed to give overall balance.

Re the speed control, Unfortunately the honby decoder does not allow adjustment - if you had chosen another brand (any other brand in fact) if would have allowed you to adjust CV's 5 and 6, which would allow you to reduce top speed and adjust the mid speed point - these changes have the effect of also compressing the speed steps into smaller changes, increasing the quality of slow speed control.

Its a mystery to me why hornby deleted these essential adjustments along with so many others which are important to get the best from locomotives and a prime advantage of DCC control, especially as it saved them virtually nothing at all cost wise!

Regards

Richard



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Brian Considine
post 11 Jun 2009, 08:45
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Very nice clear step by step "how to" & very well presented.

Thanks for the post.

I just don't understand why Hornby decoders to not have a CV5 setting.
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rascar
post 19 Jun 2009, 04:10
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Many thanks for the comments.

Your absolutely right, it is a mystery as to why Hornby would not include CV5 or any other basic user options, especially if it is not going to add cost to the decoder or impede performance.

Maybe Hornby doesnít want the decoder operated at low speed?

Would running the locomotive at very low speed / crawling pace, place any extra load onto the decoder that may have a detrimental or adverse effect to longevity?

Anyhow, it is still a great improvement on DC and as I purchased quite a few of the little R8249ís my adventures, or should I say, misadventures wonít stop here smile.gif

Cheers,
Darrell


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Richard Johnson
post 19 Jun 2009, 04:59
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***Nope, there's no valid reason for leaving it off, except that pehaps they didn't really understand DCC on day 1 at all, so didn't realise what they were doing.

Richard


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neil_s_wood
post 19 Jun 2009, 05:40
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Nice review Darrell. Thanks for taking the time to do it. Great presntation too. thumbsup.gif


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railstimulator
post 19 Jun 2009, 06:59
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I recently fitted decoders to the same loco and the 'model club 2009' version. On reassebly of the 2009 it wouldn't run at low speed and needed a lot of throttle to initially move off. I disassembled it again and fine sdjusted the motor worm to gear clearance by the use of Blu-Tac.

In my case I used bachman E-Z command two function decoders that do have SV adjustments.


Pity that all decoders don't have the same range in the CV adjustments so that programming is easier.

Enjoyed your detailed presentation, but I had't thought to reverse the motor position. The Bachman deoders come in a black sleeve to prevent ESD problems, to be honest after 40+ years of using chips I've never had an ESD problem though.
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rascar
post 19 Jun 2009, 09:40
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QUOTE (railstimulator @ 19 Jun 2009, 16:59) *
I recently fitted decoders to the same loco and the 'model club 2009' version. On reassebly of the 2009 it wouldn't run at low speed and needed a lot of throttle to initially move off. I disassembled it again and fine sdjusted the motor worm to gear clearance by the use of Blu-Tac.

In my case I used bachman E-Z command two function decoders that do have SV adjustments.

Pity that all decoders don't have the same range in the CV adjustments so that programming is easier.

Enjoyed your detailed presentation, but I hadn't thought to reverse the motor position. The Bachman decoders come in a black sleeve to prevent ESD problems, to be honest after 40+ years of using chips I've never had an ESD problem though.

Hi and many thanks for your comments.

Yes, I found reversing the motor makes the installation a lot easier.

Just remember that if you do flip the motor over, to keep the left and right wiring correct. This being based upon the direction of the locomotive travelling forward when looking at the left side of the locomotive. I got it wrong the first time round and had to re-program the decoder for direction.

Click the image for a larger photo.

The Hornby decoder orange wire needs to be hooked up to the right side of the motor for correct directional control and the grey wire to the left. In this photo of my 2009 Club model decoder install, at first glance it appears like I have wired it up backwards, with the orange on the left, but this is simply because I have flipped the motor over. If I turned the motor back over to its original position, the orange wire would be on the right.

I will put the full review of what I did to the little Hornby 2009 Club model on my Blog tomorrow.

Also, if you get the left and right bit wrong, the white wire for the front light would then become the backlight and the yellow would be the front light. Basically, all in reverse to what Hornby recommended in the Connection Specifications that come with the Decoder.

Also, I have started using the double-sided electrical tape in preference to the black goo that Hornby seem to use with some of their locomotives between the motor and motor chassis. In fact, David and I discussed this same issue this morning. You can check the comments out on my Blog.

I imagine the Blu-Tack is similar to the black goo, but I wonder if it will compress over time? Let me know how you get on with it?

As for the R8249 Hornby decoders not having speed control, I agree with a lot of others in that it must have been an early omission. Hopefully next time they will get it right smile.gif

Cheers,
Darrell


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Dad-1
post 26 Sep 2010, 10:52
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Sorry to drag this up from so long ago ..... I only joined this website to comment on the 0-4-0's
First a great 'how to add a chip' step by step guide, the best I've come across.

I also reversed the motor on both my 06 conversions in addition to adding a balanced lead load to improve both traction and electrical pickup.

I have to agree that as bought DC unmodified these leave much to be desired in their running. Simply the gearing is far too high making slow speed difficult to achieve, but giving a 'stupid' top speed. They are also light, that with the short 4 coupled wheels is always going to present pickup problems unless the track is well laid, perfectly clean - in fact spotless polished ! with locomotive wheels also polished to a bright shine and spotless.

Adding a DCC chip will make SO much difference. I used the standard cheap hornby chip and while you can't fiddle around with many CV's it works just fine. I have a car that'll do over 140 mph ...... so most of the time I'm using a VERY light throttle, this is exactly the same with the 06's all you have to do is drive it at the required speed. What can they achieve ? How about a reliable scale 2 mph ? while still pulling anything up to 12 wagons. I have managed to obtain a scale 1 mph, but will admit that at that speed it's most unlikly that you'll get across any dead frog points !! Running at 6 mph I have no problems on well laid points, once it stalls I know it's time to thoroughly clean the wheels again.

I have read reports where the 06's have been slated as a simple cheap toy ........ Yes they are cheap, and come to that simple as well, perhaps that's because the actual 06 was simple. Given a paint update, some weathering, they do look just like an 06 - certainly enough for my Blue 06 to be my favourite little engine. So to add to this superb thread may I indulge myself and include a slow running video later so long as the edit function works

Geoff T..
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Dad-1
post 26 Sep 2010, 16:55
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Couldn't edit so here, all being well is a 1 mph crawl

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ojKalAv5T8

Great little models.

Geoff T.
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