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North Derbyshire Railway Co.

Architecture

Thought I would give drilling and sawing and wiring a bit of a break this weekend. I have moved onto some modelling and in particular some of the Metcalfe card buildings. In anticipation of stuffing up at least one thing in my infancy I have started with the simple shed to a railway workers semi. It was all surprisingly straight forward so long as you take your time and follow the instructions closely. The hardest part is managing the glue. I was recommended an acetate balsa/cardboard glue by the hobby shop which is proving somewhat difficult to work with. It comes in one of those metal-style tubes like toothpaste used to come in - you press it and the tube stays the shape you pushed it to. This does not lead to a great deal of flow control with glue continuing to ooze out even when pressure has stopped. I resorted to a combination of direct from the nozzle and transfer to a matchstick applicator which has seemed to do the job adequately. I think I have a handle on it now.

With the confidence high following the Wren-like proportions of my shed, I moved onto the actual railways cottages themselves. Again pretty easy, if not a little fiddly in N scale. Especially when it comes to rolling and affixing those pesky chimney pots. They look great once they are in place, but it takes a little work to get the knack of rolling them to identical'ish diameters, even using a nail as template.

I guess it has taken about two and a half hours to put together one shed and house and there are four of each in the one pack. I will put everything together and get them in their final locations before looking at any weathering and added touches. It's great value too when you import them from the UK at only GBP5.50 each, at today's rate less than AUD$10. Here I would pay between $17 & $24 for the same kit.

Today it took around three hours to do one set of terraced housing, and yes the chimney pots are crooked by design. After all, whoever heard of a row of houses all with perfect aligned chimneys? I like this set which has lots of options built-in, like bay windows or flat, slate or flat roofs on the bay windows, dorner windows in the attic, different coloured curtains and doors, paving or cobbles, etc. It means you can eaisly set up a lot of row housing that doesn't look like lots of the same thing. This is just the trick for the Whaley Thorns Pit Road which is just line after line of this style, all the way up the hill.

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Now I can move onto the more substantial projects awaiting me - the rest of the terraced housing, loco shed, farm houses, platforms, corner shop, pub, etc. I might have gone a little overboard in the lead up, but they will all find a place in the layout. If there is one thing I have got it's plenty of space. The beauty of N scale.

by: Expat on 22 Feb 2012, 14:52

Hi Trevis and congratulations on your efforts with the Metcalfe kits. Have you had a look at the http://www.scalescenes.com/ downloadable kits which are, IMHO, a tad better than Metcalfe as you don't end up with those exposed edges to disguise and, once you have downloaded them, you can print up and make as many copies as you like.

As a tip for future use I use ordinary PVA to assemble card kits. I put a little into a small saucer or something similar and apply it sparingly with a small paintbrush. That way you only get the glue where you want it and you don't end up with glue oozing out of the joints.

I don't bother with rolling up paper to make chimney pots. They never look realistic so I fit either plastic or white metal ones. I also fit gutters and down-pipes which you can get from Ratio.

Keep up the good work.

by: Trevis Lawton on 24 Feb 2012, 10:00

Trevor,

Cheers, I have since added a second row of low relief terraces. I have seen the Scalescenes, but from the fairly spartan website it looked as though it was all based on printing out the designs onto paper then sticking onto card, which struck me as a little messy. I am not too worried about the cut edges in Metcalfe as a little marker pen, followed by the inevitable weathering techniques will probably remove any signs of these anyway. Although having said that there are certainly some Scalescenes that look quite neat such as the main station, Metcalfe is a little less grand in that area. I can certainly see one of these at my Lincoln end of line.

I quite like the chimneys once rolled, but it is certainly a right effort to get them out all alike.

I will certainly giuve the PVA a go because the acetate is a right pain, keeps blocking up at the tip.

Might try a bit of pastel dust on a shed this weekend and see if I can get the hang of a good aged look.

Cheers
TC



QUOTE (Expat @ 22 Feb 2012, 22:52)
Hi Trevis and congratulations on your efforts with the Metcalfe kits. Have you had a look at the http://www.scalescenes.com/ downloadable kits which are, IMHO, a tad better than Metcalfe as you don't end up with those exposed edges to disguise and, once you have downloaded them, you can print up and make as many copies as you like.

As a tip for future use I use ordinary PVA to assemble card kits. I put a little into a small saucer or something similar and apply it sparingly with a small paintbrush. That way you only get the glue where you want it and you don't end up with glue oozing out of the joints.

I don't bother with rolling up paper to make chimney pots. They never look realistic so I fit either plastic or white metal ones. I also fit gutters and down-pipes which you can get from Ratio.

Keep up the good work.

by: Expat on 24 Feb 2012, 16:37

Hi again Trevis,

I've made several of the Scalescenes kits, including the large station building, and have found them to be excellent kits. Most people use 'Pritstick' or similar 'dry' glue stick to fix the print-outs to the card and it's not at all messy.

Regards,

Trevor

QUOTE (Trevis Lawton @ 24 Feb 2012, 18:00)
Trevor,

Cheers, I have since added a second row of low relief terraces. I have seen the Scalescenes, but from the fairly spartan website it looked as though it was all based on printing out the designs onto paper then sticking onto card, which struck me as a little messy. I am not too worried about the cut edges in Metcalfe as a little marker pen, followed by the inevitable weathering techniques will probably remove any signs of these anyway. Although having said that there are certainly some Scalescenes that look quite neat such as the main station, Metcalfe is a little less grand in that area. I can certainly see one of these at my Lincoln end of line.

I quite like the chimneys once rolled, but it is certainly a right effort to get them out all alike.

I will certainly giuve the PVA a go because the acetate is a right pain, keeps blocking up at the tip.

Might try a bit of pastel dust on a shed this weekend and see if I can get the hang of a good aged look.

Cheers

TC



QUOTE (Expat @ 22 Feb 2012, 22:52)
Hi Trevis and congratulations on your efforts with the Metcalfe kits. Have you had a look at the http://www.scalescenes.com/ downloadable kits which are, IMHO, a tad better than Metcalfe as you don't end up with those exposed edges to disguise and, once you have downloaded them, you can print up and make as many copies as you like.

As a tip for future use I use ordinary PVA to assemble card kits. I put a little into a small saucer or something similar and apply it sparingly with a small paintbrush. That way you only get the glue where you want it and you don't end up with glue oozing out of the joints.

I don't bother with rolling up paper to make chimney pots. They never look realistic so I fit either plastic or white metal ones. I also fit gutters and down-pipes which you can get from Ratio.

Keep up the good work.

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