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Makemineadouble
post 7 Aug 2020, 07:31
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John Webb
post 7 Aug 2020, 08:43
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QUOTE (Makemineadouble @ 7 Aug 2020, 08:31) *

We're at Bury St Edmunds in Suffolk, in the large square (Angel Hill) in front of the Abbey gateway. I've visited here twice. Rarely seen as empty as this, however. This print was from a oil painting, and used 1945-55. Artist is F D Blake, whose Inverness carriage print we saw 4 days ago.
This is the nearest match to the print, although taken to the right of the artist's viewpoint and so loses the Abbey gateway:
Angel Hill

© Copyright Oxyman and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Note too in the print the white post in the centre of the print. This is it and the Abbey gateway:
Entrance gateway to St Edmund's Abbey

© Copyright Richard Humphrey and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
The pillar is a traffic sign designed and erected in 1935 and was rapidly nicknamed 'The Pillar of Salt'. Designed by Basil Oliver, architect to Bury St Edmunds Town Council. It is constructed of whitewashed concrete and metal. The first internally lit road sign in the country apparently! Grade II listed - see https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-...t-entry/1376516.

John
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Makemineadouble
post 8 Aug 2020, 07:21
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John Webb
post 8 Aug 2020, 08:47
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QUOTE (Makemineadouble @ 8 Aug 2020, 08:21) *

Well, never visited here at all - but as "I am a name, not a number!" it is familiar to me from that remarkable TV series "The Prisoner" - we're in Portmeiron, the incredible village on the north bank of the Afon Dwyryd estuary. Designed and built by Sir Clough Williams-Ellis over some 50 years. Despite some 400+ photos, no one has got quite the view of this print - this photo shows the more distant buildings:
Bridge House and Toll House, Portmeirion

© Copyright Jeff Buck and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

I've no information about the print - "The Travelling Art Gallery" site makes no mention of it.

John
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Julian2011
post 8 Aug 2020, 19:59
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Wow! Well done John. I've been there, too, but missed the connection by about a thousand miles.

Must try harder next time.

Julian


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Makemineadouble
post Today, 07:50 AM
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simply outstanding, very well done.



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John Webb
post Today, 08:52 AM
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QUOTE (Makemineadouble @ 10 Aug 2020, 08:50) *
simply outstanding, very well done.


Another Donald Maxwell 'ink and wash' drawing from 1936 - and another place I've visited several times, albeit some two decades after Maxwell did this picture. A look at the 30+ prints by him on the "Travelling Art Gallery" site shows we're on the east side of Freshwater Bay on the SW extremity of the Isle of Wight. Another of these places where despite 200+ photos on the Geograph website, no one's got quite the same view; this is taken from a bit closer to the bay, at a lower level and a wider angle of view:
Freshwater Bay

© Copyright Steve Daniels and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
While the print shows the large house on the hillside (a Holiday Fellowship hotel) and the end of the large building closer to sea level (the Albion Hotel as it was called several years ago), he seems to have omitted 'Fort Redoubt' on the high cliff forming the termination of the west end of the bay. Completed in 1856, this small fort was part of the 'Palmerston Follies' (as they became known) - coastal defences aimed at protecting the IoW and Portsmouth. View herewith:
Freshwater Redoubt

© Copyright Andy Stephenson and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
It's now a private house. Tennyson Down stretches away into the West; a monument to the poet is at the peak. It eventually terminates in the Needles forming the western extremity of the island.

Totland Bay and its village are to the NW of Freshwater - had a number of family holidays there in the 1950s and we sometimes walked up Tennyson Down.

John
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