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> Box Labeling.
Mr N. Ladd
post 23 Apr 2018, 00:39
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Is there a possibility that manufacturers who's coaches have the close coupling design used on certain models of their coaches can label their boxes as having this design, as in the past I found that I lost out a small fortune after buying a rake of lovely looking coaches which didnt run well on my layout. I sold them on taking a loss in the process. I realize some love the design and others, like me, dont. It would help for us to know before we buy.

On a similar note (Though I've been informed that Hornby already do this so well done) could manufacturers label their boxes to show if the model (Be it a loco or an item of rolling stock) will negotiate first radius curves or not as the case may be. While many of us do have the luxury of space, to others, sharp curves are a godsend, and we do need to know on the box before we spend our money and find we are disappointed.

Things like this may seem a little thing to some, but to me, after taking a big loss after buying one manufacturers products (Which were lovely well detailed models and not cheap!) due to the close coupling design not liking my layout, I have not purchased another new coach since in the fear that the older designs may have been reworked to also include the close coupling system. Not all retailers will let one take the product out the box and look, and very few mail order outlets provide the Information either on the advert.

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Peter Armond
post 24 Apr 2018, 09:42
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As far as I am aware all Hornby and Bachmann coaches and rolling stock come with normal tension lock couplings which are at the same standard and height. Recent examples I have bought (in the last 4 years) have usually included close couplings as an alternative coupling for those that want to fit them.

I have not purchased coaches from other manufacturers but have bought locomotives and other rolling stock from others all of which have come with standard tension locks.

As normal tension locks seem to be an industrial standard there would be no point in labelling this on boxes.

Presumably your coaches were from some other manufacturer and/or a non UK manufacturer?

First radius curves are not recommended for most rolling stock and while 0-6-0 locomotives and wagons will negotiate these and some may have had success with other items even train sets now come with a minimum of second radius curves.



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Mr N. Ladd
post 24 Apr 2018, 16:34
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I am referring to the devices which pull the couplings in towards the body of the coaches when on straight track and push the couplings out to negotiate sharp corners.
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butler-henderson
post 24 Apr 2018, 16:49
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Virtually all OO releases over the last few years have been designed for a minimum 438mm radius (2nd radius), and work a lot better on curves of less sharp radii ; presumably you were trying to run the coaches round a first radius curve.
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Sol
post 25 Apr 2018, 04:30
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QUOTE (Mr N. Ladd @ 25 Apr 2018, 02:04) *
I am referring to the devices which pull the couplings in towards the body of the coaches when on straight track and push the couplings out to negotiate sharp corners.


I think that is becoming the norm and I see nothing wrong with as it is designed to allow for sharp curves of toy train style. You should remember that the majority of 00 models are that - finely detailed models, not toys.

Long wheel based rolling stock of Australian outline all have body mounted couplers & certainly not designed for 1st radius track.


--------------------
Ron Solly
Devan & Summersett Railway - very, very loosely based on GWR/WR/BR.
Using NCE DCC.
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Mr N. Ladd
post 27 Apr 2018, 14:50
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How do we tell the difference between a model and a toy? Is it in the scale to gauge ratio or the design of the couplings used? As I dont think 00 gauge would bear up too well however well detailed the items may be.


(I think it is best to get back to the point I was referring to where I (And if I need to know so do many others) would like to know if a coach has or does not have the close coupling mechanism designed into the chassis before I make a decision to purchase it, and the easiest way (Rather then to open every box to look), is to put a little symbol or some sort of label to let me know if it is part of the design).
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Anthony Richards
post 27 Apr 2018, 15:44
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Can you not just ask? Or look on line?

Tony
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butler-henderson
post 27 Apr 2018, 16:39
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QUOTE (Mr N. Ladd @ 27 Apr 2018, 14:50) *
How do we tell the difference between a model and a toy? Is it in the scale to gauge ratio or the design of the couplings used? As I dont think 00 gauge would bear up too well however well detailed the items may be.


(I think it is best to get back to the point I was referring to where I (And if I need to know so do many others) would like to know if a coach has or does not have the close coupling mechanism designed into the chassis before I make a decision to purchase it, and the easiest way (Rather then to open every box to look), is to put a little symbol or some sort of label to let me know if it is part of the design).


What exactly was the problem you had ?
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Mr N. Ladd
post 27 Apr 2018, 18:49
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I found the close coupling system added so much flex that if the loco hit a tiny bit of dirt on the rails and jerked, the coaches would uncouple. I didnt want to run them as fixed rakes. I made a decision that I'd stick to older designs, but as I've not had much of an income this last decade, I've been out of touch with today's models. The thought was that if I want to avoid this system I need to know which coaches have or do not have it, and there seems no way to know unless one purchases it and is disappointed if they have the design.
Dont get me wrong. I'm not against others enjoying the design. I just dont like it from a personal point of view. (If I knew that I'd stay with 00 gauge in the long term view I'd change to a different coupling system like Spratt & Winkle so it won't matter either way, but as I also have 0-16.5 models which I'm enjoying, I may decide to sell the 00 so changing couplings is not the best option).
I thought if the boxes had some sort of icon to indicate they had the close coupling design it would not only make things easier for me, but for others who like or dislike the design.
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