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> CJFs' Minories
shedmad66
post 17 Jun 2009, 19:00
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I may seem a bit 'still wet behind the ears', when i say this, but what, if anything, is so special about Cyril Freezers 'Minories' plan. [email protected] seen a lot about it in various magasins, and just wondered wht it was all about.
Cheers for any help


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Shedmad 66
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dwb
post 17 Jun 2009, 19:12
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It's hard to explain in a nutshell without reference to the original plan, but I'll try.

It's that time when if you had a space of about 2' x 8' for a OO gauge model railway, you reached for a map of the south west of England and modelled a small GWR branch line terminus station with a bay for the Autocoach, cattle dock, small engine shed, etc.

The idea of CJF's Minories was to fill this space with a small city terminus station. I think it had three passenger platforms, a parcels line and probably ditched the goods handling and put the engine facilities "off stage" in the fiddle yard. This set the scene for intensive morning and evening rush hour traffic with loco hauled trains. Fresh engines come in to take new trains away and release the previous loco in charge. At the end of the rush hour, carriages would be taken away by the station pilot to the carriage sheds for storage / cleaning until the next time.

David


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alastairq
post 17 Jun 2009, 21:34
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the 'beauty' of the Minories plan was its simplicity.

CJF was a 'pioneer' in this respect..someone has to originate an idea, do they not?

Minories was originally concieved as David says, as an inner urban terminus......but on the original plan, all the pointwork was within a confined space...this making things easier regarding baseboards,e tc.

plus, IIRC, there were only 5 or 6 turnouts....and it is these turnouts and their position which held the key to the success of the design.

Yet the plan managed to display the grandeur and complexity of an inner city passenger terminal.

However, it's main forte was in its operational capabilities.

The pointwork was cleverly thought out so that every platform face could handle both arrivals and departures.

Plus, the orginal design was for 'double track'...which is much easier to work from an operational veiwpoint, than single track....so there was the potential for 'main line 'operation as we all knew it then, without breaking the bank regarding trackwork [which was more expensive back then than today, pro rata].....all within an area, a DWB says, which most commonly would have suggested a rural GWR branchline.

However, the basic track/turnout layout need not be exclusively ''inner city'' [most inner city terminii had goods facilities elsewhere nayway]....Iain Rice produced a very nice plan, based on Minories, but which represented an OUTER urban terminus..ie the other end of the commuter line.......this time with but one platform, two faces, some coal sidings and loco servicing.......plus a run-round..which Minories didn't have/need, since it relied upon 'station pilots' etc..This plan is to be found i I.Rice's book ''Designs for Urban layouts''......he has a neat goods yard [on its own] too.

a PM to me would elicit a scan..
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alastairq
post 17 Jun 2009, 21:38
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other basic track designs have been named and consigned to model railway legend....again, being the first...


John Allen's ''Timesaver'' switching plan, is one...then there's ''Inglenook sidings'', for another....
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BobB
post 18 Jun 2009, 07:03
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One of the things about the Minoroes layout was that the appearance of the station throat was enhanced by positioning the points to look more complicated than they actually were and it gave the impression of trains weaving in and out of obsticles (such as the signal box) to get to the platform face. This was all done with points and track that were readily available. Just using readily available points often gave a toy like appearance (or dare I say an American look). Minoroes avoided this toy look. Last year, the Railway Modeller magazine reproduced the plan in the August edition using 'modern' geometry track. Without the fiddle yard, the station was about 7ft long by 1ft wide. Adding, say, another 3ft for a fiddle yard gives a (potentially) very busy station on a shelf !

I wonder if the original design ever lived up to its appearance from the operational point of view given the limitations with running capabilities and point reliability in the old days. Now with all wheel pick-up, much better track, automatic un-coupling and a selection of very fine control systems; I think the operational appeal is great. Having said that, the originall proposed an overall roof and high reataining walls would all but hide the realistic operation.

(At one stage, I considered using small camera's to watch what was going on but came to the conclusion that this was a bit of a nonsence !)

The basic idea from the original station can of course be expanded but reduction would be difficult. I'm curently doodling variations but I keep coming back to the original. Since I model the BR blue period, I suppose most of the traffic should be dmu's (perhaps emu's ?) but I have not been able to resist a class 25 with a couple of suburban coaches !

Some of these old track plans essentially embodied the railway operations from steam trains which didn't really start to change until the 80's (or maybe mid 70's) when track rationalisation started with a vengence. I would imagine that prototypical running a representation of the current (British) railway is quite simplistic compared to the days of old. I suppose it all comes down to personel choice in the end.

Sorry for the ramble shedmad66, but these things are a bit complicated to answer concisely !

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