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> Flextrack, Filling short sections
AndyJB
post 1 Feb 2013, 14:39
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I'm laying some flextrack on a long curve. I started by placing my switches and now I'm filling in between those with lengths of flextrack. In one area the last standard length of track is about 10" too short. Should I just fill in with a short piece or is it better to cut a couple of full lengths to make up the size I need so as not to have too many joints close to each other. Example: if I need 40" I cut two 20" pieces?
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Essex2Visuvesi
post 1 Feb 2013, 14:56
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If you are soldering dropppers to each section of track then I don't think it matters. Just work in a way that gives you the least wastage


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Ian Abel
post 1 Feb 2013, 16:39
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QUOTE (AndyJB @ 1 Feb 2013, 08:39) *
I'm laying some flextrack on a long curve. I started by placing my switches and now I'm filling in between those with lengths of flextrack. In one area the last standard length of track is about 10" too short. Should I just fill in with a short piece or is it better to cut a couple of full lengths to make up the size I need so as not to have too many joints close to each other. Example: if I need 40" I cut two 20" pieces?

Andy,
It might sound "nuts", but I'm planning on going the "equal length pieces" when I need to.
Reason - I think it'll improve the clackety-clack sound with the joins more evenly spaced!

(This probably CONFIRMS that I'm nuts!)


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Ian
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Coming to you from - N44' 54.9 W093' 21.0
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dhargy
post 2 Feb 2013, 06:06
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I agree with Ian - although I can't confirm that he's nuts biggrin.gif

The clickety clack is a bonus.


What I've found is that sometimes the rails of short cut pieces are more prone to misalignment, especially when adjacent to points (switches). I'm actually in the process of dealing with this exact situation on a section of my layout.
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ALAN PETERS
post 3 Feb 2013, 14:17
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Hi, It will help if you flex the ends of the track sections prior to laying as this will help to prevent the rail's natural tendency to straighten out, causing a slight kink in the curve. My layout has floating track on stone ballast, and beause this sits on thick sheets of polystyrene through which the path of the route is carved, pinning was not an option, so this was a problem that I had to overcome, but having a min radius of 2'6" made the job a little easier.


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34C
post 4 Feb 2013, 12:39
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In the interests of wastage reduction, I attempt to lay all full size pieces, and position any short 'make up' piece on a straight section. When working between fixed in position points - a common scenario as described in the OP - one simply works from both ends to a convenient meeting point positioned on a straight or nearly so section. (At need you can put in a half inch make up piece on a straight, not a clever idea on a curve.) The make up pieces are usually left until the whole track piece laying is complete, so that just one or two lengths of track end up being made into multiple make up pieces.

Rail joints can be made sounding or quiet, by adjustment of the gap. For steam era, I like as much clatter as possible especially around any point network or junction.
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