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> Is Z gauge viable for British prototype?
7113
post 10 Sep 2008, 19:34
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QUOTE (billhko @ 10 Sep 2008, 18:49) *
Clicking on this led to The NS 'Hippel' 0-6-0 diesel shunter.


Or as we call 'em - gronks, though I have no idea why!

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BritishZ
post 8 Nov 2008, 19:51
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This really is a small part of the forum!

Does it reflect a lack of interest in British outline Z?

But then there was no demend for a round wheel - until someone invented it!

In addition to Germany Z is very popular in America and getting popular in Japan - search "MTL Z" and "Pro Z"

Here are some photos I took of Z Gauge British outline. They include the layouts mentioned above.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/planestv

Everything is scratch built or heavily modified

I think there would be a big take up for British Z Gauge and an enterprising cottage industry could make a lot of money.

Some put the emphasis on packing something into a briefcase but I think they miss the point. Z's big appeal is no tight curves, close coupling and scale length trains. And scale length trains mean lots of coaches and wagons sold.

Imagine a basic Mk1 coach with plain clear plastic sides. Then add appropriate liveried sides, punched out windows and pad-printed details. A plain wagon and box van could be the basis of a big variety using the stick-on-sides idea.

The market's wide open for someone who can do a deal with Marklin, MTL or AZL for running gear.

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Rowan
post 9 Nov 2008, 16:24
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Standen Watchett is a beautiful layout, with great piccys.Thanks BritishZ.
Any more information on this layout?

smile.gif
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post 8 Dec 2008, 21:56
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BritishZ I don't suppose you noticed what the DMU were based around or upon. Any information on the basis for these locomtives would be interesting.
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rossi
post 8 Dec 2008, 22:56
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I believe a British outline class 47 was once produced ,in the eighties I think .I did see one in shop so it wasn't a daydream.Not that well up on UK locos at the time so not totally sure it was a 47 .
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7113
post 9 Dec 2008, 13:38
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There certainly was a Z kit for a 47, a friend used to have one on a layout back in the 80's. I wonder what happened to it?

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Chinahand
post 9 Dec 2008, 15:21
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I looked at this thread with no real fixed opinions either way. Having read the various comments, however, it seems to me that one basic point is being missed.

Being a N Gauger myself I find that this is just about as small as my eyes and hands can comfortably cope with. It's also worth noting just how many N Gaugers find that even this is too small as the years advance and physical degradation sets in. I just picked up a load of N Gauge stuff on eBay from just such a modeller who is moving up to 00. At the moment my hands are still reasonably steady and the eyes are, with assistance, still good enough to model in this scale. Who knows what the ravages of time will dictate, however.

To my mind Z Gauge is a 'novelty' scale which, without endless hours of dedicated work, - (all of which test the eyes to their limits) - cannot hope to produce any sort of realistic layout. Maerklin have, it seems, cornered the market for the very limited numbers of modellers who do indulge in such masochistic processes and they, quite reasonably, limit themselves to producing European models. The prospect of any other major manufacturer producing British outline Z Gauge locos and rolling stock is, I'm afraid, so unlikely as to be the stuff wet dreams are made of, particularly in the current economic climate.

Sorry if this offends those few Z Gaugers we have but I felt a 'reality check' was necessary.


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PGN
post 22 Jan 2010, 19:26
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I'm an N-gauger, but my wife professes to find Z "cute" - and wants em to build her something, provided it's British-outline (yes dear ... rolleyes.gif )

But the 47s DEFINITELY exist ... because I have two of them. Well, the bodies, anyway. All I need now is to find what chassis they're meant to fit ...
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Ravenser
post 24 Jan 2010, 15:02
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I think they were made originally by Maerklin (but as a complete loco?) in response to requyests from a British group (Z Club UK???)- however they never advertised them or officially listed them
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PGN
post 24 Jan 2010, 22:46
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Mmmmmm ... not sure about that.

I first encountered them in about 1991 or 1992 - when I was told that they were a private venture by somebody planning the expand into a whole range of other British Z items. But, as with so many such bold ventures, they went no further than this one item ...
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steamer
post 30 Jan 2010, 19:21
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Whether a scale is going to be manufactured for any market is going to be dictated by the age group of the buying public, cannot help feeling that a lot of what is made in the larger scales N, 00, 0 is very much aimed at the older buyers returning to their childhoods with some cash and often more space than they could ever get when they were a kid. In the 40+ years since my childhood trains were pushed aside by Scalextric, early home computers, radio controlled models, hand held eletcronic games, Play Stations/X-box and probably i-gadgets now. All those generations have been distracted from trains sad.gif

So that probably leaves mainly us oldies reverting after an interruption to resurrect our meglomanical streak as the controller of a railway biggrin.gif

When I was younger I was almost a rivet counter in 4mm scale rolleyes.gif

Now I am back to railway modelling, no way, I'd love to run full length trains, build them myself but a quick reality check rules out total scratchbuilding in 4mm, and certainly smaller scales like N and Z, and even glorious 7mm where the enormous amount of space and s required rules that out.

You need need good eyesight even to appreciate the wonderful 4mm RTR models these days let alone N or Z, and then there is the clumsy fingers which use to be so nimble sad.gif which can break off the fine detail before your eyes even knew it was there.

So for me the next best option is lovely old veteran 4mm, 2 rail Dublo, Trix with some kit builts thrown in, can't help thinking that most other born again modellers may think the same way (if I can't see the detail it may not as well be there), and while we oldies probably have the s and more say over the space (which depends very much on ones wife, of which I am very lucky biggrin.gif ) than we ever had as a kid, a scale as tiny as Z is not likely to create much of a target for our hard earned cash.

So no demand, no manufacture, and will trains in other scales still be in demand in 30 years time when the deprived (of trains) generation start to retire, and we are passed caring, our ashes in an ashpit somewhere, I doubt it some how sad.gif

Jim
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Joe D'Amato
post 11 Feb 2010, 15:34
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I've been moving all my efforts towards doing some Branchline work in Z and it has been quite an adventure. I'm working on my Master Model Railroader certificate with the NMRA buiding only in UK Z...got a lot of raised eyebrows!! One note, the 47's operated on a Marklin Chassis, I have the number someplace and will post it. Currently I am modifying an MTL SD40-2 chassis to fit under some castings I made. This involves some serious cutting and pasting and not for the faint of heart, but can be done. The wheel set up is great, but the wheel base is too long. Lucky for me, there's enough meat to trim to make this work. For more modern stuff, this chassis is spot on for a Class 66 and it's cousins, I belive a shell is in development... I'm also working on the art work for brass/resin coaches that will ride on the MTL NN3/Z old style passenger trucks. In this scale they look fine and save the effort of having to scratch build working trucks. For steamers there are a number of cast options and with the release of the Japanese Mike in Z at the amazing price of $90.00 US, the door is open to some interesting UK Steam conversions. I have a Super D I plan on planting on one as soon as it shows.

I agree that this scale is not for rivet counters. I am enjoying being able to show the wonderful countryside with rolling hills and plots and bridges and rivers in an area that larger scales can only go back and forth on. Something very relaxing watching a nice string of cars chug around a miniature landscape. So don't give up hope. Like anything it takes a few folks to kick something in gear...enough examples show up in press, the more legit the scale takes on. Keep the faith.

http://southernoregonz.com/UKZ.html

Joe

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Rotherwood EM1
post 12 Mar 2010, 22:42
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I too had some Z gauge plastic class 47 bodies... never had a use for them, i was just facinated by the small size and i got a load of them cheap (just pennies each) i'm sure i still have them tucked away somewhere in the loft! i remember converting one to roughly look like a class 56 even though i had no intention of finding a chassis for them smile.gif
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BritishZ
post 30 Mar 2010, 13:25
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Hello Rotherwood EM1

Thanks for the reply and I'd love to have those '47 bodies if you can find them - you really might help kick start British outline Z.

There will be a few pounds in it too to give you a return on your 'few pennies'.

Please contact me; adrian at britishz dot co dot uk

I would love to see any photos of your z '56!

many thanks

Adrian
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Rotherwood EM1
post 30 Mar 2010, 16:32
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If i find them i'll let you know smile.gif but i've been going through boxes and still nothing sad.gif
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