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> Sources of Information on Signals, Books on prototypes and models
Bear 1923
post 24 Mar 2018, 14:35
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ABC-Modern-Signalling-Handbook-by-Stanley-Hall-Paperback-2010

Numerous editions of this Ian Allan book available on E Bay.

Very basic - but a good start for beginners.

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Julian2011
post 24 Mar 2018, 18:23
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QUOTE (Bear 1923 @ 24 Mar 2018, 14:35) *
ABC-Modern-Signalling-Handbook-by-Stanley-Hall-Paperback-2010

Numerous editions of this Ian Allan book available on E Bay.

Very basic - but a good start for beginners.

cool.gif


I will see about obtaining one of these, it would be good to get enough knowledge to get to be a beginner. ....... [It's so dark down here, a little light would be good.]

Thanks for the head-up Bear.

Kind regards

Julian


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Bear 1923
post 29 Mar 2018, 14:48
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The following is a bit of an obscure source but it can render some useful track diagrams (with signalling), working methods (and how to get them wrong) and even train consiste at times. It does take a bit of searching through but this can be very productive.

http://www.railwaysarchive.co.uk/updates.php

Also - for modern signalling practice (2001) -

"Introduction to Railway Signalling" - IRSE (Inst Rly Sig Engineers) ISBN 978-0-902390-30-0
This is expensive new but can occasionally be found on E Bay. It is not one of the two previous IRSE books on signalling practice which repeated and combined the material in the small IRSE green books. Relative to those it is new information presented in a less technical way.

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Bear 1923
post 29 Mar 2018, 15:04
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I've just realised, I don't think thaqt this has been listed before...

Railway Signalling and Track Plans Bob Essery -- ISBN 9780711032156

This is one of a set of books by Bob, most of which are about operation of the real railway. They are all picture heavy but useful starting places.
As an ex signalman I have a different perspective to Bob (an ex footplateman) so I could pick holes (not that I would ever dream of being pedantic) - nevertheless these books are some of the broadest and best starting places for the non-railwayman/enthusiast/modeller.

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Bear 1923
post 30 Mar 2018, 08:15
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smile.gif I found some more smile.gif

I haven't checked these out yet but they would seem to be (at least) pictorial records of the signals by pre-grouping company - although not necessarily pre-grouping examples.

Signalling and Signal Boxes Along the xxxx Routes by Allen Jackson (Paperback, 2017)

Routes I've noticed so far are - GCR, GER, GNR, LSWR, LBSCR, NBR, NER, SECR.

I haven't seen an example yet. Perhaps someone can provide a review?

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Also - "various sections of the country" Signal Boxes by Dafydd Whyles (e.g. Lincolnshire)

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John Webb
post 30 Mar 2018, 08:36
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QUOTE (Bear 1923 @ 29 Mar 2018, 16:04) *
I've just realised, I don't think thaqt this has been listed before...

Railway Signalling and Track Plans Bob Essery -- ISBN 9780711032156

This is one of a set of books by Bob, most of which are about operation of the real railway. They are all picture heavy but useful starting places.
As an ex signalman I have a different perspective to Bob (an ex footplateman) so I could pick holes (not that I would ever dream of being pedantic) - nevertheless these books are some of the broadest and best starting places for the non-railwayman/enthusiast/modeller.

cool.gif

Sorry - did get listed - and I reviewed it as well - somewhere about page 2 of this thread with a separate review!

Regards,
John
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Bear 1923
post 4 Feb 2020, 22:42
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I have just picked up from E Bay...

Colour Light Signalling for Model Railways Simon Paley 2019 CrowoodISBN978 1 78500 625 8

Point 1... This looks good - potentially very good.

Point 2... The title should really be Modern Multiple Aspect (MAS) Colour Light Signalling for model railways - with a tiny bit of history.

Point 3... It's still good - for what it is.

What it is, is a description of Multiple Aspect Signalling mostly post 1980 - and largely post 1990. This is not a criticism - only a statement of fact. The book will be a great starting point for anyone modelling the modern (largely privatised) era.

It touches upon various subjects other than the signals that can be seen and therefore modelled but mainly focuses on these. This is fair enough - going into more detail on some of the various subjects would require a much larger book.

Being modern era it deals with Route Relay Interlocking (RRI) and Solid State Interlocking (SSI) - although not in great depth. The point for modellers to note is that these are late, developed patterns and both the track layout and application of signals is determined by them and significantly different from both semaphore era track arrangement and signalling - and - the stages that progressed between them and the modern image. The "intermediate" stages, which were RRI, initially largely copied the earlier semaphore arrangements - both of track layout and signal location. These are not dealt with. This is not surprising, the information would take at least a book in its own right - possibly one each for each of the Big Four and their subsequent BR Regions.

(From an historical point of view the earlier - particularly the very early - colour light signalling was superimposed on the existing railway by long standing railway signalling engineers - who (rightly) had a massive concern for safety - and the experience of some horrific disasters. Progress from semaphore to colour light was step-by-step. Progress was also severely limited by lack of funds - and wars).

Being modern era the book inevitably includes modern "searchlight" LED signals as well as the "traditional" multiple incandescent lamp/multiple aspect signals. Consequently I cannot say that it has ignored searchlight signals as a colour light type - but I have not yet seen anything about the early incandescent lamp searchlight colour light signals.

Three other apparent omissions (so far). 1. the oddity Ansaldo LED searchlight signals. 2. the various "like-for-like" LED multiple aspect heads (i.e. those that had an LED aspect separately for each colour) - I might be wrong on this last point. 3. the use of modern/LED signals as replacements for semaphore and non-MAS colour light signals.

Meanwhile...

My conclusion about this book...

For modellers it is a good starting point - for 1990s to present day colour light signalling - of the MAS kind.
I would go further and say that for anyone modelling the post-privatisation scene it is a "must have"... Although, as always, further research and study "on-the ground" is essential.

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John Webb
post 5 Feb 2020, 09:27
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Thanks for drawing our attention to this new publication - not one I'd heard of until now.

I'm not aware of any true 4-aspect LED heads (ie four separate LED aspects), only 4-aspect signals where the filament bulb has been replaced by an LED 'light engine' rather than changing the whole signal head.

Regards,
John
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Bear 1923
post 5 Feb 2020, 22:14
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John!!! yikes.gif ohmy.gif mad.gif ohmy.gif

"filament bulb"??????????? Bulbs you plant in the garden!!!! The railway uses electric lamps.

Lancaster Castle station... Replacement "like-for-like" LED heads all over the place - 3 and 4 aspect VMS signal heads (stacks of 3 and 4 individual aspects) They are easily recognised by the fact that they have no hoods projecting from over each aspect. There is also at least one at the Down end of Warrington Bank Quay. They have a hot zone in the clear plastic front to each aspect very similar to the hot zone in the front element of the aspects of incandescent lamp light signals.
Just recalled - Bicester North has some 3 aspect Signal House (I believe) individual aspect LED colour light signals. These are distinctive close up because the LEDs make a hexagonal pattern whereas the Dorman types (Searchlights) have their LEDs in circular patterns - usually with "eyebrows" of "pigs ears" instead of a hot zone. The Signal House aspects at Bicester North also have no equivalent "up close" provision.

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Bear 1923
post 5 Feb 2020, 22:22
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Something else to note - the "non-plastic" Dorman 3 aspect LED signals (all 3 aspects in one LED searchlight) often - but not always - have a back plate that is full size for a 3 separate aspect head. This gives visual conformity with the previous signal - the fact that the illuminated indication in a Dorman is always at the bottom of the back plate and not in different height positions doesn't seem to matter.

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Bear 1923
post 5 Feb 2020, 22:36
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A couple more (HEAVY * ) recent texts...

Peter Woodbridge British Railway Signalling History Technology Chronology 1825-2018 2018

IRSE 100 Years Of Railway Signalling And Communications 2012 --- This is not the 1946 Railway Signalling and Communications 1946 by "Various" of the LNER.

These are most serious texts. Both are what they proclaim on the cover. Excellent. Anyone serious about signalling should have them - they cost a lot but are not expensive - given what is in them.

* they are both heavy by content and physical weight - mailing costs are "high" - but - like the books - worth it.

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Bear 1923
post 5 Feb 2020, 22:53
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More updates...

For those with a significant interest who want to research the thinking of the period and "up-to-date" practice... Although these are generic/ specific to the signalling engineer authors - individual company/line research would have to be added...

For early railways -

Clement Stretton Safe Railway Working 1893 -- This is as good as Rapier On the Fixed Signals of Railways (ICE) 1874 * - which, AFAIK may be available as a digital copy/reprint - but I have yet to find a really good digital copy of any early text - they are normally fuzzy - to varying degrees of uselessness.

That said - for early C20 an original of C. Byles The first principles of railway signalling including legislation in the United Kingdom (1910) is a must... a digital could suffice.

For mid C20 an original of Lewis Mechanical Railway Signalling is another must ... I have a digital large format copy as well - poor and the fold out diagrams of the original.are not complete - despite the accommodating format.
Also - Tweedie & Lascelles Modern Railway Signalling

That Railway Signalling and Communications 1946 by "Various" of the LNER. Is good. - often available on E Bay

Everything by JNO Aitken (small books) is excellent - includes books on working/operation. Very practical - all for c1940-195x... Quite often available on E Bay.

C1920 Raynar Wilson is useful if you are very into that period and the current new technology of power and automatic signalling - of the time. - often available on E Bay.

OPPS! Almost forgot... Danger Ahead: The Dramatic Story of Railway Signalling Richard Blythe HB 1951 - an extremely readable long/broad history. Most useful - quite often available on E Bay.


* Rapier's text is a paper read before the Institute of Civil Engineers. A full text includes the discussion by many prominent signal engineers of the time. For most modellers the interest would be primarily historical.
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Bear 1923
post 6 Feb 2020, 21:20
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ohmy.gif Yet another one I obtained recently...

Railway Safety Principles and Guidance part 2 section D Guidance on signalling HSE ISBN 0-7176-0953-7 -- 1996

This is the HSE's "update" (aka replacement of) the BoT's and MoT's Requirements for Passenger Lines etc. However, this slim book only covers signalling - as the title states.

For those that like technical - but easily understood/clear stuff this is basic for modern image - but (of course) built on the previous Requirements.

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John Webb
post 7 Feb 2020, 09:34
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QUOTE (Bear 1923 @ 5 Feb 2020, 22:14) *
John!!! yikes.gif ohmy.gif mad.gif ohmy.gif

"filament bulb"??????????? Bulbs you plant in the garden!!!! The railway uses electric lamps.

Lancaster Castle station... Replacement "like-for-like" LED heads all over the place - 3 and 4 aspect VMS signal heads (stacks of 3 and 4 individual aspects) They are easily recognised by the fact that they have no hoods projecting from over each aspect. There is also at least one at the Down end of Warrington Bank Quay. They have a hot zone in the clear plastic front to each aspect very similar to the hot zone in the front element of the aspects of incandescent lamp light signals.
Just recalled - Bicester North has some 3 aspect Signal House (I believe) individual aspect LED colour light signals. These are distinctive close up because the LEDs make a hexagonal pattern whereas the Dorman types (Searchlights) have their LEDs in circular patterns - usually with "eyebrows" of "pigs ears" instead of a hot zone. The Signal House aspects at Bicester North also have no equivalent "up close" provision.

cheers.gif

You'll have to excuse me - a physicist and also involved in stage lighting for many years - a 'lamp' to me is the complete light unit or lantern.
But I'll freely admit that on looking at a copy of the Westinghouse leaflet on our 1970s colour light signals they refer to a 'Signal Lamp', not a 'bulb'!

Regards,
John
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Bear 1923
post 8 Feb 2020, 22:00
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ohmy.gif You would dice with death arguing with the S&T about the issue of "lamp" v "bulb". biggrin.gif rolleyes.gif

I would guess that when the illumination was by oil the whole source of light was the complete "lantern" - i.e. signal lamp. Subsequently I imagine conservative thinking moved to the idea that the little glass things were Incandescent electric lamps.

I wonder what jargon the office "plane language" people would come up with... ermm.gif wacko.gif
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