...

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

5 Pages V  « < 3 4 5  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Is 3D printing the way to go??
dwb
post 24 Aug 2013, 21:54
Post #61


Station cat
Group Icon



Group: Moderators
Posts: 9,511
Joined: 17-January 06
From: Central southern England
Member No.: 507



QUOTE
an “armature” consisting of the trunk and major branches that can be tastefully anointed with foliage later


A similar thought has cross my mind. The challenge would be the shapes and bark textures. From those scary photos I posted the link to earlier, I think it might be better to use one of those "gel to solid" machines rather than something which lays down layers one at a time.

We will have to wait and see. There's definitely an opportunity for someone there.

David


--------------------
Want to post pictures in your posts but don't know how? Instructions can be found in this topic
Almost all the photos I post can be found in my albums. There are 900+ at present. Click the Gallery button to the left of this post.
Go to the top of the page
 
+
Long funnel ...
post 24 Aug 2013, 22:51
Post #62


Longfunnelled&tiresome
*******

Group: Members
Posts: 2,058
Joined: 18-June 11
From: UK Tyneside
Member No.: 10,630



QUOTE (LTSR @ 24 Aug 2013, 22:30) *
Now if someone could come up with a low cost method of taking a true 3D image of an object, I’m thinking in particular of such things as trees, that could then be fed into a 3D printer . . .
I'm not thinking of a whole tree,.... but of an “armature” consisting of the trunk and major branches that can be tastefully anointed with foliage later.
my emphasis in the quote.
There has been a piece of German building surveying software in existence for at least the past 20 years that integrates photos of an object from a minimum of 2 viewpoints to produce a 3D vector image. I can neither remember the name nor the price, but I understand it was widely used after German re-unification in response to an urgent need for restoration and repair of historic buildings.

LF&T
Go to the top of the page
 
+
Guest_Lee J Polson_*
post 31 Mar 2014, 14:16
Post #63





Guests






Personally, while I find the concept interesting it's such early days for this technology and IMP it just isn't there yet in terms of both cost and quality. The other type of printing where a laser fires at liquid resin (steliography I think) and the printed thing rises out of the goo like the creature from the black lagoon seems to be better and doesn't have that odd surface texture, or at least much less of it.

Give it a few years and you might be able to buy locos and bits like you do with iTunes (iTrains - someone copyright that quick!), download and print yourself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+
Bluebellmodelrai...
post 18 Apr 2014, 09:55
Post #64


Passed Fireman
****

Group: Members
Posts: 415
Joined: 2-January 10
From: Isle of Wight
Member No.: 7,093



It's possible for bespoke items... although Home printing at this stage is not up to scratch doesn't offer a high enough resolution or quality of the print.
Companies like Shapeways, Imaterialize ect... are capable of producing good models a few people and model shops are using it to create items. The technology is always improving.
The only decent Home printer I have seen is a B9 creator which is only really good for N gauge or something around that size, but was very impressed with what that can do, again that's a steroliography curing the resin with light / UV Using a projector to make the model.

But for now we will have to stick with using Shapeways and other companies.

Even Hornby and Bachmann have used it to create prototypes, an image of the J15 from Hornby looks to be entirely 3D printed apart from the wheels obviously.

I am certainly getting some results out of it.





--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+
34C
post 19 Apr 2014, 12:16
Post #65


In depth idiot
**********

Group: Members
Posts: 7,178
Joined: 31-May 07
Member No.: 1,818



QUOTE (Bluebellmodelrailway @ 18 Apr 2014, 10:55) *
...I am certainly getting some results out of it...

Lovely looking end result, you should be very pleased, I know I would be. Good example of the sort of complex 'repeat cell' form which is mind-numbing to produce manually to the same standard. Been there, done that many years ago: I am lucky in my area of interest, that a kindly toolmaker then went and generated enough in the way of moulding tools that similarly panelled sides are readily available for direct use and adaption for the subjects I want. Thank you Ian Kirk!

Most wagon and loco subjects are relatively easy from plasticard and sheet metal, with use of the commercial metal parts which 3D printing cannot currently provide. I have done the comparison between a wagon body built solely by myself and assembled from 3D printed. Nothing in it, in terms of the final item of rolling stock. If I needed more than four or five it would be worth getting it 3D printed: but those subjects the RTR manufacturers have generally got to already.

What 3D printing doesn't do is the part of modelling I find most difficult, painting, glazing and finishing to the same standard that we now get routinely on RTR. That'll be when I start to get interested...
Go to the top of the page
 
+
dwb
post 19 Apr 2014, 14:10
Post #66


Station cat
Group Icon



Group: Moderators
Posts: 9,511
Joined: 17-January 06
From: Central southern England
Member No.: 507



I think it's "Horses for courses". For thin sections I prefer plastic sheet / strip or metal. For complex shapes where the thickness doesn't matter so much I have sent off for my first 3D part.

David


--------------------
Want to post pictures in your posts but don't know how? Instructions can be found in this topic
Almost all the photos I post can be found in my albums. There are 900+ at present. Click the Gallery button to the left of this post.
Go to the top of the page
 
+
scarborough rob
post 20 Apr 2014, 11:25
Post #67


Fireman
****

Group: Members
Posts: 137
Joined: 28-November 08
From: Scarborough - miles from anywhere interesting
Member No.: 4,281



QUOTE (dwb @ 19 Apr 2014, 14:10) *
I think it's "Horses for courses". For thin sections I prefer plastic sheet / strip or metal. For complex shapes where the thickness doesn't matter so much I have sent off for my first 3D part.

David


yes, i have been getting some excellent results myself, especially as now shapeways tells you before it prints where the problems are and how to fix them, also I cant tell the difference between moulded plastic and their polished products, I have even sold a couple of the HSFV-1's that i did firstly for myself and secondly to sell


--------------------
The king called all of his wise men to consult with him
He asked them for something that would
make him happy when he was sad and sad when he was happy
the wise men went away and discussed the requirements
then they came back and handed the king a ring
on the ring was engraved the legend
"This too shall pass"
Go to the top of the page
 
+
dwb
post 23 Apr 2014, 19:36
Post #68


Station cat
Group Icon



Group: Moderators
Posts: 9,511
Joined: 17-January 06
From: Central southern England
Member No.: 507



I received my first 3D printed part today:



I am really pleased with it. I have posted more details in my "On my Layout" thread in this post - link

I am pleased how this particular "horse" has run and will use this process again for architectural models with complex / unique shapes.

David


--------------------
Want to post pictures in your posts but don't know how? Instructions can be found in this topic
Almost all the photos I post can be found in my albums. There are 900+ at present. Click the Gallery button to the left of this post.
Go to the top of the page
 
+

5 Pages V  « < 3 4 5
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



RSS    Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 11th July 2020 - 15:41