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> T Gauge layouts
Martin Kaselis
post 21 Mar 2015, 03:22
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In my experience, T can be quite reliable. Yes, you have to keep the track and wheels clean, and carefully remove fluff from the gears and axleboxes.

However, the real key is having more than one motor unit per train. I run three trains on my little layout - an HST with 3 motor units and two other trains with permanently coupled and wired double-headed locos. During its only exhibition showing so far, those three trains got through two full days of stop-start automatic running with no stalls or similar issues. My little 1-motor-unit backup DMU, on the other hand, was a real pain. I'll be adding another power car before that one goes back on the track.
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jcuknz
post 22 Mar 2015, 07:21
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I can only say congratulations Martin ,,, I am going to stick to Gauge One smile.gif
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Martin Kaselis
post 22 Mar 2015, 07:55
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Gauge one? Hmmm - there's enough room to build an entire T gauge layout in one of your open wagons!
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Mr N. Ladd
post 10 Dec 2015, 18:51
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What are they like at staying on the track? Not surprised about current collection though it may be possible to look at it via either ading a third rail (Hornby Dublo 3 rail locos were rarely suseptible to losing current) or maybe a tiny overhead system? Umm. All I can say is to see if you can get as much electrical connections via wheels or skates etc as possible. The concept of having a layout running where one can have a real "Birds eye view" seems amazing to me, though the thought of painting any rolling stock or buildings etc... !!!
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Martin Kaselis
post 12 Dec 2015, 12:07
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QUOTE (Mr N. Ladd @ 11 Dec 2015, 05:51) *
What are they like at staying on the track?

Very good actually. Over a two-day exhibition a few months back with three trains running I had exactly one derailment, and that was after someone bumped the table. The only issues I have had are:

The 3d printed 4-wheel wagons have quite a lot of friction, so a long train generates a lot of drag. When I try to run a long goods rake around tight (hidden!) balloon loops the whole train can get pulled off the track. That limits me to about 20 wagons, or slightly more if there is a motor unit part way along. There is now a new wagon design available with pinpoint axle wheelsets which should be better, but I haven't tried them yet.

Their very light weight and stiff couplers mean that the vehicles don't always settle down to run fully centred on the track, so sometimes the coaches in a train can look a little misaligned.

QUOTE
Not surprised about current collection though ... or maybe a tiny overhead system?

As long as you keep things clean and have two motor units per train, then not a problem. I suspect a working catenary would be a bit of nightmare, though the dummy system looks quite good.

QUOTE
... the thought of painting any rolling stock or buildings etc... !!!

At long viewing distances (12 inches!), even quite crude paint jobs look fine. It works out to the same amount of fiddliness per square inch as the larger scales.
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Mr N. Ladd
post 12 Dec 2015, 13:13
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Ah. I was puzzled in my mind about the need for more then one motor bogie. You've explained it well. I did find with 00 gauge that two motor bogies in different locations often caused the train (As in not just the locomotive) to leave the rails due to one shuddering over a bit of dirt or over a frog while the rear one is still pushing. I did hear that someone on a garden railway had provided power for his complete HST set (Before the days of the all wheel drive HST powercars) via two motor bogies in the buffet car, so I gave it a go and ordered spare HST chassis mouldings to cut for use. It kindof worked but though I wired both up so if current was obstructed they would both stop, one motor was lazyier then the other and often caused the wheels to rise and de-rail. I'm glad you are not experiencing the same .
About painting. Yes. From a distance. Though I'm glad I've gone up a scale from 4mm to 7mm (Though narrow gauge for economy purposes and fun!) I have been glad as I find painting the larger items easier!
You mentioned about 3d printed wagons. Those sound interesting. Regarding the friction and now pin point bearings are available it should make quite a difference. As T scale is still in it's infancy you should find as the years pass, more and more items become available as more minds see the possibilities. That is a good thing, though in a few ways one gets an adventure feeling when one has a little railway only a few others have.
When I was young there was a tradition on Good friday once a year to climb up the end of the mountain to get to the rock slide. Us kiddies (Younger kidies needed to slide on dads laps for safety) would slide down the smooth rockface bending our legs ready for the sudden stop at the bottom while parents and tired kids would sit and enjoy the view. I remem ber looking down and watching c ars and lorries and the occasional bus, and the trains passing on the main line, along with the rarer site of the three class 03's and the 50 to 60 wagons they'd tow along on the old Burry Port and Gwendraeth Railway below. And such scenes would be amazing to re-create in a small scale today. smile.gif Sadly this portion of line closed in 1983 (Ish) and the other bit closed later. (A friend of mine is trying to reopen the upper parts and he has bought a class 03 that used to run up here along with a rare find. An 0-6-0ST that was built for the line in 1900. Last I heard it was being restored but in amazing order considering! Only certain locomotives and rolling stock can be used on this line due to bridge heights as it was first built as a canal following a route donkeys uset to bring coal down the valley before the canals came along. The lower parts are now a cycle path, but still suffer during winter months from flooding.(Well. It was a canal once!)
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