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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
can anyone tell me who makes 00 scale inspection pits in the track please. i know ROCO did it in H0 scale a few years ago but here.......bugger all from what i see !

Also, where can i get my hands on 00 scale BRUTES ? do you have to make your own ???

And finally, the track rodding ?

want to make my layout look as real as poss one day.

thanks all
 

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Faller makes them and it does'nt matter if its OO or HO.

Baykal
 

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I think Peco make an inspection pit.

Not sure about Brutes . I reckon you're talking about a little etched kit - if anyone does it, or possibly whitemetal. A few months ago I'd have said try Signs of the Times but he's closed. He did some trackside items , generally whitemetal which were sourced from another supplier - unfortunately I don't recall who actually made them.

Try the websites/catalogues for a few of the "usual suspects" like Hurst Models and Langley

Not sure about "track rodding". Do you mean point rodding ? If so the obvious first place to try would be MSE
 

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>I think Peco make an inspection pit.
They make versions for code 100 and code 75. Pete Harvey has a couple on the layout he has been documenting on his layout thread and his blog. So if you want to see what it looks like installed, follow this link to the layout thread or this link to the blog?. The blog has a photo of the "raw" pit before Pete built up the hardstanding. For the record he is using code 100 (you can deduce this from the three way point. In finescale, the offering is a tandem point or asymmetric three way point if you prefer).

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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>what on earth is peco 75 and peco 100 ?????
Aside from Setrack, Peco make two ranges of OO gauge track aimed at the British / European market. The older range uses code 100 nickel silver rail which is 1mm high. This rail height allows virtually any model rail wheel to negotiate point crossings, an invaluable asset if you run old Triang/Hornby or Lima stock from the early '80s or earlier.

The newer "Finescale" range uses code 75 nickel silver rail which is 0.75mm high. There is not enough depth in the point crossings to allow deep wheel flanges to pass, so at best the stock jumps about a bit, at worst it derails. There are a few track configurations available in the Finescale range that are not available in the standard range - namely electrofrog crossings, slips and a tandem point. All of these 'Finescale only' items require external switches to be added to the wiring before they will work correctly. The standard range items including the electrofrog points do not require external switches so long as normal point wiring practices are followed.

I use Peco code 75 track because I want the absolute minimum length of "dead" rail in my point crossings and I am prepared to deal with the additional wiring to get it.

I guess you really didn't want to know all that, but you did ask...


David
 

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QUOTE (KODIAK BEAR @ 27 May 2007, 12:55) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>what on earth is peco 75 and peco 100 ?????
The number (or code) indicates the height of the rail in thousandsth of an inch. Thus the smaller the number, the smaller the rail. What it doesn't tell you is the cross-sectional shape, or in the case of flat bottomed rail, the width of the foot. This means that although rails of the same height might be available from several manufacturers, you can't necessarily assume they will be the same in all other dimensions, and may not fit any premoulded sleeper assemblies.
I found exactly this problem when trying to use some flat bottom rail from C & L that I already had with the concrete sleeper bases produced by InterCity Models. The foot of the rail was really too wide for the Pandrol rail fastenings, and caused the sleeper material to deform during assembly. Using the recommended code 82 rail solved the problem, but you could hardly tell the difference just by looking at the rails beforehand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
ok thats good to know. 75 sounds like the one i need.
i have ROCO track with ballast and the peco 75 sounds an ideal match.

is peco the only one's that make track with concrete sleepers?

i am trawling through books etc etc and i am building sturminster marshall (bailey gate) which had unigate dairies and goods yard and it would be great to build a model layout of it, hence getting the right track etc etc.
 

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QUOTE (KODIAK BEAR @ 27 May 2007, 20:09) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>ok thats good to know. 75 sounds like the one i need.
i have ROCO track with ballast and the peco 75 sounds an ideal match.

is peco the only one's that make track with concrete sleepers?

i am trawling through books etc etc and i am building sturminster marshall (bailey gate) which had unigate dairies and goods yard and it would be great to build a model layout of it, hence getting the right track etc etc.

If the Roco track you have is the currently discontinued Rocoline with flexible roadbed (which is code 83) you can still match it up with the Rocoline without roadbed code 83 which is still available.

If you would like a current Roco catalogue please send me a PM.
 

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QUOTE (KODIAK BEAR @ 27 May 2007, 19:09) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>ok thats good to know. 75 sounds like the one i need.

is peco the only one's that make track with concrete sleepers?
Peco concrete sleepered track is only available in their code 100 range.
It's not available in code 75.

Concrete sleepered track is available from Tillig (code 83).

Beware of the term "finescale" in relation to Peco code 75 Streamline track. There's nothing finescale about it at all.
 
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