Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,505 Posts
Some signal lamps were electrically powered, but often oil-lit signals have wires running up the post to connect to a switch indicating the arm position back to a repeater in the signalbox and also connections to a bimetal strip in the oil-lamp - if the lamp flame failed and went out, the bimetal strip cooled down and broke a circuit which then alerted the signalman that the lamp had gone out. Such devices were in use from around 1850/60 onwards, so wires on signal posts are truely prototypical.

Regards,
John Webb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,505 Posts
My pleasure. Basically the 'lamp out' detectors were fitted to any signal out of the direct sight of the signalman so that he knew for certain all his lamps were OK. Particularly applied to distants which could be up to around 1,500 yards away, or where bridges or tunnels restricted his view.

Regards,
John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,505 Posts
QUOTE (Brian @ 13 May 2008, 16:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>....So seeing a fine wire/s running up the post would be quite acceptable...

If the signal was close to the 'telegraph' poles at the side of the line, the wires would sometimes be run from the nearest telegraph pole to a pair of insulators mounted near the top of the signal and make their way down the signal for a short distance rather than up. But as most of us don't include working telegraph cables particularly at 4mm scale....


Regards,
John Webb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,505 Posts
By coincidence I got the V R Anderson & G K Fox book "Stations and Structures of the Settle & Carlisle Railway" at a reduced price at Geoff Gamble's book stand at the SW Herts MRE last Saturday. (ISBN 0 86093 360 1, OPC, first published 1986, reprinted 2000)

Ribblehead
The double-armed Distant signal at the N. end of Ribblehead Viaduct is shown very clearly in Plate 44.
Track layout from Midland surveys of 1874 and 1913; signal diagram from 1967 information.

Blea Moor
There was a Midland signalbox from 1892 to 1941 - there is and end-on view in Plate 47.
It was replaced in 1941, when the sidings were extended and made into loops, with a brick and timber LMS box. This is pictured in close-up in Plate 49.
Track layout from 1913; signal diagram from 1962 information.

Settle (Station)
Track layout from a 1926 LMS plan; signal diagram from 1963 information.

Stainforth Sidings
Track layout from 1913 survey; signal diagram from 1963 information.

Roger Sivitar's book "The Settle to Carlisle - A Tribute" (Baton Press, 1984, ISBN 0 85936 293 0) has some lovely if more modern photos.

Hope the above is of help.
Regards,
John Webb
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top