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Hi, Im a real beginner in all this, totaly un-equiped. ive had trains for many years boxed up But today, there out alltho all i have is one GP50 loco, one hopper and one box car, first time they have run in 5 years, at the moment i just have an ovel track spend most of my time just getting it to work. look forwords to learning more here, sepecialy about making realistic senary (all i have is a green board with a building on it) Im picky I like things real, and mostly want to learn about making realistic scenery and weathering trains.

And here is what own, hope it will grow (as my wallet shrinks)


I also have a couple of buildings and a few cars, but no photos of those. and sory about bad photos.

So hi everyone, Hope i can learn from you and make this a bigger hobby for me.
 

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Hello Junkheap and welcome to the forum, I am new to this forum myself but find that people here are willing to help, good luck with the hobby.
 

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Hi Junkheap and welcome to the MRF.

You've certainly come to the right place if it's help and guidance you're looking for.

I take it from the pics that you are planning to model US Ho scale. Do you have any ideas on layout plans yet and, if so, what sort of space do you have available ??

Good luck with the modelling and ask away.

Cheers,

Expat.
 

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Hi Junkheap,welcome to the forum, and the world of model railways....or, in your case apparently, model railroads.

Since you seem to have acquired some US -prototype equipment, how much do you know about the real thing?

gaining knowledge of the real thing is quite important, as it allows you to have an idea about what is realistic,and what is not?

I don't know where you reside, but if in the UK, perhaps swapping to UK prototype models may help you gain a better understanding of what you seek?

If you do have transatlantic leanings, then perhaps the forum below will give decent information?
http://www.zealot.com/index.php?page=the-gauge.com

I myself have US models.....I see you have an old Bachmann loco?

Whilst there isn't anything really WRONG with this, you may find it's running abilities to be a bit coarse, wen compared with the more state-of-the-art offerings from the likes of Atlas, Kato, etc.....[and likley, pricier too]

Seeing what other US modellers use is a good hint as to where to go.

again, if determined to follow US prototypes, why not join the NMRA British Region? http://www.nmrabr.org.uk/

For advice, I submit that you try not to do anything too big as a beginner?

Your stated aims may well fall by the wayside if you try to tackle too much too soon.

Given what you are after, I suggest starting off with a small, shelf-size layout of the switching or shunting variety.

This sort of beginning will give you plenty of opportunity to expand your scenic ideas, without getting out of depth.

The sort of locos and stock required need not be burdensome on numbers of cost...what you have already is a good start.

also, given that sheer volume or numbers would not be an issue, your aims regarding weathering, etc, can be achieved realistically...without becoming overwhelmed?

plus, with a switching [shunting] layout, the other side of model railroading comes to the fore, and that is OPERATION?

with a switching layout, so much more can be rung out of the layout, than a simple oval-type.

this site ma give you a better idea of what can be achieved in a small space

http://www.carendt.us/index.html

At least you now have the web to help you find out more...

when I started US modelling, all I had to go by were a few issues of Scalemodel Trains, a Walthers catalogue, and a book of stamps...oh how things have progressed?
 

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treated myself last night to the July issue of Continental Modeller.

The layout of the month is, in my view, an excellent example of what can be achieved in a minimal space, with but the minimum of trackwork.

it is quite simply an oval, with ONE spur [siding] off.

Yet, it becomes so much more due to the scenic efforts of its builder.

it is vitally important NOT to try and cram in everything and anything...that one spur works better [in my view] than a whole fan of sidings....in the space available.

After all, the prototype tried to make do with the minimum?
 
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