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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After buying an airbrush of Ebay I have been messing about with weathering stock. I have also used powders and hand brushing acryllics.









 

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Chief mouser
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Overall looking good - the DMU particularly. However the front of the 24 looks a little overdone. I imagine that it may well look better in real life.

Regards
 

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Well done


I love the faded door on the GUV making it look like a replacement

I personely prefer prestine clean locos' and would never dream of 'dirtying up' and of my stock, but each to their own

Brian
 

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QUOTE (bro sewell @ 6 Jun 2008, 14:28) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Well done


I love the faded door on the GUV making it look like a replacement

I personely prefer prestine clean locos' and would never dream of 'dirtying up' and of my stock, but each to their own

Brian
I personnaly think that it is best to have a variety: some new pristine engines and coaches, but if you look close there are slightly muddy bogies and perhaps dirty wagons in a siding.
Regards,
Ben
 

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Inspiring work!.

I'd also be interested in knowing what airbrush you used and, because I've never done it before, a little detail of how you go about it. Does it need a lot of skill? I'd like to try weathering some of my stock (that's not already been factory weathered) but don't want to ruin it.

Cheers, Robert.
 

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Hi Robert,

The best way is to try.

Peronally I have not weathered a lot of my stock (time is a bit of an issue) but prefer to use "powder" rather than painting.

The added bonus is that if some of the powder falls off the item, it adds to the weathering of the track environment as well.

One thing to be cautious of, is overdoing it. It is one thing to have an extremly dirty item vs everthing being rusted out.

Strangly weathering is caused by the weather. Low down on items the dirt is sucked up, higher up the weather causes dirt to flow down.

For rust I use bright orange, then black

Again IMHO weathering from a photograph is ideal.

Cheers

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
QUOTE (ben100 @ 6 Jun 2008, 12:30) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Looks good!
What airbrush is it? I can't make my mind up which one I should choose.
Regards,
Ben

QUOTE (Robert Stokes @ 6 Jun 2008, 17:32) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Inspiring work!.

I'd also be interested in knowing what airbrush you used and, because I've never done it before, a little detail of how you go about it. Does it need a lot of skill? I'd like to try weathering some of my stock (that's not already been factory weathered) but don't want to ruin it.

Cheers, Robert.

Its just a cheap Revell airbrush from Ebay running from a can of gas. Getting the spray right can be tricky sa you can see on the front of the class 24, I might paint the yellow again and redo the front end but you hace to start somewhere. For the DMU I gave it a light blow over with rust / frane dirt & black acryllic. When that is dry I used the powders in four different shades. Then add the brushed on paint in certain areas dabbing of with cloth if there is too much paint and then brushing over with soft brush too soften the effect. Once you start you can get really into it I have looked at hundreds of images and every loco or wagon is different. Pleased with DMU and wagons not so much with the class 24.
 

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Chief mouser
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I'm glad you didn't take my comments on the 24 the wrong way.

Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
QUOTE (BRITHO @ 9 Jun 2008, 15:41) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm glad you didn't take my comments on the 24 the wrong way.

Regards

Not in anyway, comments are appreciated, I feel the same way about the 24 but you have to start somewhere. Its a bit addictive weathering.
 

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QUOTE (fordy361 @ 10 Jun 2008, 06:57) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Its a bit addictive weathering.

Like all things - I have been trying to weather some road vehicles and that is not as easy as it sounds!

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Took some of the comments on board and have removed some of the splattering effect from the airbrush with white spirit on a cotton bud then wipe over with a soft brush.




 

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QUOTE (fordy361 @ 10 Jun 2008, 21:39) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Took some of the comments on board and have removed some of the splattering effect from the airbrush with white spirit on a cotton bud then wipe over with a soft brush.

I really like the dirt on the 24; are you planning to remove a little where the windscreen wiper wipes?

The new National Express white/grey livery must be hell to keep clean. The 125s I've seen with it are all dirty.

mal
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
QUOTE (ben100 @ 11 Jun 2008, 13:28) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi
For using an airbrush, are special paints nescessary?
Regards,
Ben

No just normal acryllics bought from Ebay thinned down for the airbrush.

QUOTE (Purley Oaks @ 11 Jun 2008, 15:01) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I really like the dirt on the 24; are you planning to remove a little where the windscreen wiper wipes?

The new National Express white/grey livery must be hell to keep clean. The 125s I've seen with it are all dirty.

mal

Yes I am going to clean windscreen area on drivers side.
 

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Hats off to you!

I'm too nervous about weathering any of my locos and sort of prefer them in pristine condition. I could probably pluck up the courage to weather the bogies and underframes but not the bodies.

Ideally I'd have two of each loco I own and keep one in pristine condition and weather the other!

I have started weathering wagons and found using acrylics is best to start as if you make an error you can just wash it off whereas enamel is harder to get off.

Another tip is to buy the cheaper sets of wagons sometimes on offer as if it goes wrong it's no great loss (I bought a rake of 6 Railroad Shell tank wagons and went to market on them and was well pleased with the results). It's also good practice and if you do a set/rake at a time you get the paint mixture the same applied to the whole lot rather than having to re-mix new paint on another occasion.
 
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