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I know of no resistive controller that supplies half wave rectified voltage to the track as the norm David. I know some traditional controllers do offer the option of switching to half wave rectification as pulsing DC (which is essentially what half wave rectification is) improves slow speed starting and slow speed control. As regards applying 14 volts to the motor causing it to run hotter, although this is true the 14 volts being talked about here is only present on the track when the controller is set at maximum - a postion rarely necessary and rarely used and providing Ryan avoids using the max setting on him controller he is unlikely to cause any damage to his Hornby motors.

Voltage control on a digital system does not produce heat. Voltage control on these systems uses technology where the supply to the motor is rapidly switched on and off and the average voltage the motor sees and reacts to is a product of the 'on' time verses the 'off' time. The heat produced in digital controllers in purely due to the current being taken by the motor. Although the voltage present on the track when employing these system may be high and present all the time, the motor will only 'see' what the on board digital controller allows it to see so all the power for the motor is routed via the on board decoder.
 
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