Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all

I have decided to replace my quite boring current test track with a new, larger and fully scenic one so it will make my days more interesting.

I'm also doing this as I also need to fix a frustrating problem - I am often in the middle of programming when clients (like you) drop in for help with a loco, and right now when you do that, I have to stop what I'm doing, losing lots of work as I have to take the loco being programmed off the track while I help them.

Its no big deal with simple DCC settings, but a real frustration when its the middle of a sound programming task or during sound file creation!

But... I always like to do my best to help straight away, so the answer is to fix the problem which isn't you and I but the test track!

So... the new track will have several sidings that I can use separately when needed, each with a rotary switch that will let me connect it to DCC or one of up to six different computer linked programming interfaces I need to use from time to time.

The challenge: (Hope its OK Doug)
I've made the new board and actually do have a track plan already but thought it'd be nice to see what YOU as MRF members came up with.

No real limitations, and the "size and specs" are all on the attached drawing.

The Scale:
It'll be for HO and OO scale ONLY with a small exception -a single line for EM which is still 4mm scale OO but at a more correct 18.2mm gauge (thats all in the Notes on the PDF attached).

No O or N scale or P4 or G this time I'm afraid - these will all be done on a separated track at my workbench in future (no disrespect to those other scales & Gauges - its just that 98% of the work IS in the scale I'll build it in!

Rules:
All in the attached except the timing.

Time Limit:
A good comp is a quick comp, so Friday 24th October is the end day - I'll decode over that weekend who wins and will post the prizes on the Monday as long as they included an address with their entry!

Entries:
by email to [email protected] please. Email to include any description you like and attachments are fine.

Please make them in any format you like by the way - I can open most file types no problem. DO include your address and contact details of course.

Perfect presentation is nice but it isn't all thats important - clever design and a realistic or effective scenic potential plus any added detail if you can manage it (like signalling) is the key.

Don't worry about any control or wiring related issues - if it can be built, I can wire it no problem.

I am equally happy to receive hand drawn entries that have been scanned or computer generated ones!

Prizes:

This is for fun more than anything but I will add some nice prizes to say "thank you" to entrants!

I will give THREE prizes - one first and Two runners up. If there are lots of entries, I may add more!

For the winner:
A 6 pack of Flickerfree valued at $A99 OR an ESU decoder tester and a set of superb fine wire strippers for DCC installs. (winner can choose)

For the two runners up:
A pair of the same top quality wire strippers PLUS some of the best solder ever made for fine wiring (my own Sapphire 179) PLUS 2 packs of Prototype White LEDs for loco lighting etc. OR a Pack each of MASTERswich V2 and MASTERswitch PLUS (Runners up can choose)

Announcement and display:
I will post all - especially the winning entries on THIS thread as attachments so you can see the results!

Follow-up:
I will post images as I construct it. This may take some time but I really wantit to be something special, so it may include some useful modelling techniques and I'll try to "step by step" those as I go!

Post decision discussion:
I will be happy to discuss anything related to the implementation of the plan in a positive way positive but my reason for a decision re winners won't of course be a subject for debate.... it IS a fun competion after all!

Finally for now:
Ask any questions you like before entering but please if possible do it here on list! If you want to post your plan here thats OK too, but if you'd prefer to keep it secret thats OK of course...

Kind regards

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
QUOTE (john woodall @ 16 Oct 2008, 17:19) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Is the closing date Friday Perth time or uk time?

***Hi John

To be fair globally, I'll not actually start looking at them to make a decision until Sat PM Perth time (We are at GMT/UK time +8). That way, there's a little flexibility to cover every possible timezone.

Kind regards

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
QUOTE (zmil @ 17 Oct 2008, 14:21) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi Richard
I have been playing around with the design using Anyrail
Is it OK to put in 1 double slip?

Regards Zmil

***Any track formation you want is fine - go for it!

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well the first couple of entries are in, but I'd llove to see a few more as the week progresses....

If you haven't already started, have a go - as I said in my initial post, its the design and thought that goes into it thats important not the beauty of the presentation, so whether you use a computer programme or a pencil to draw it out, the odds of winning are exactly the same!

kind regards

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
QUOTE (Martin71 @ 19 Oct 2008, 18:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>How about offering the scale Ripple Head you have....and I will design and build it for you!

m

***Ummm.... Nope!

I'd drive you insane as when it come to building layouts, I don't play well with others - I like things done my way!

Anyway....

If I saved the cost of building Ribblehead once more in time and materials I could afford to fly Iain Rice back to stay with me again and build it together
.

BTW Ribblehead will soon be available as a kit if you are really keen on it... full, half and 14 size... Not cheap and still a lot of work to create the finished result.... But worth the effort.

Why don't you enter anyway, Martin


Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
QUOTE (Expat @ 20 Oct 2008, 20:20) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi Richard,

By half size do you mean suitable for N Scale or just half of the length of yours ??


Cheers,

Trevor.

Nope... Sorry Trevor... Never in N! Creating the masters for that viaduct in one scale is more than enough for one lifetime :).

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
QUOTE (Lancashire Fusilier @ 29 Oct 2008, 08:49) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Well, what's the verdict then.....

***I'm close to a decision - the fact is that none will work for me as presented, so I'm going over them and considering a decision based on the "elements" as presented - it complicates it as I want to explain why I chose what I did!!!

So far the cut is to the final 2

new decision date this Friday....

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
***Decision time. It took much longer than I thought to make this decision!

Basically, no single entry is 100% buildable "as is" as each has an aspect that won't work well for a test track... However each also had at least one element I really like, so that sort of balanced things!

(I didn't really expect the perfect "build it as drawn" answer, just some interesting entries!)

* The hardest thing for all was the narrow neck area - however thats where two computer monitors will go so I had no choice!

* Also hard was the combining of EM and OO in a single narrow strip "layout". Most used gradients and overpass, one used a dual gauge diamond which is actually no problem to build.... I may do both in the end and make it interesting!

* One had great detail as to structure suggestions, one had a full signalling diagramme....

* Two thought about the end of the board and disguising at least one ends "exit point" nicely.....

* One included some 009 - with one of my favourite industries... lime kilns! Hmmm.... I hadn't intended it on this test track, it would give me usable 9mmm gauge track though!

* Two used computer generated drawings which were nice to review, others were hand drawn, but that made no difference to my decision at all as effort and design were more important to me!

ALL were well thought out!

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

I will now combine aspects of each plan and create the final design.

SO... for now, what did I decide?

I have thought a lot about it and as no ONE plan is totally what I want, I have decided to award prizes differently.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

I will take and use aspects of FOUR entries, and award FOUR equivalent first prizes, and NO runners up! So... each of the 4 will receive a first prize... A $99 value six pack of DCCconcepts "Flickerfree"

The winners are... (in alphabetical order)

Expat
Lancashire Fusilier
UPNick
Zmil

Congratulations and thank you for entering!

I'll pack up your prizes next week and send off to Dubai, UK and (thankfully for post cost
) Perth Local!

kind regards

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
QUOTE (john woodall @ 31 Oct 2008, 15:05) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>so do we get to see the four "winning" plans?

You will John, when I have time to make them into a common format to present - they are a wild variety at the moment!

probably in a week... Lots of other things to do at the moment though!

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
***Yes, but I would like to get the trackbed down and then I will post a picture of the "in-progress" test track layout. As I don't have time to spend detailing up a drawing to look pretty with extra detail, the basic plan will look pretty meaningless.

fundamentally its at 2 levels. The EM on a high track which will cross the 16.5 double track at one end and simply finish as if an abandoned siding/ line about 2/3 of the way along the module... I may change this to bring it full length (as originally conceived) but unlikely unless I feel inspired to double my bridge building as a means of concealing the other end of the 16.5.

The lower level / 16.5 will be double track with 2 crossovers and a total of three sidings... platform at the 2 siding end with stn bldg etc, other end single siding not yet decided.... could be anything interesting.

I MAY add a small section of 9mm as "narrow gauge"... perhaps making it something like a sleeper making depot with some simple narrow gauge ostensibly for moving the sleepers in and out of the creosoting room etc - its an intersting industry with lots of odd buildings to cobble together.... Otherwise N will remain consigned to a separate formal straight test track for sound programming work.

LHS is all stone/brickwork and buildings + stone retaining walls, centre probably a signal box & RHS will have some natural rockwork, greenery and trees + buildings appropriate for siding.

all will also be made ready for several new products DCCconcepts will produce to be displayed of course....

I had to break my own arm and use Peco track medium radius code 75 points.... simply because most customer locos will run on them, but they are highly modified... I couldn't bear using them without taking to them with sharp things - laying them "as is" would have been impossible to live with :) :). Mods are both electrical & physical - For a start they've all been modded to remove a few CM of rail so they sit at thecorrect double track spacing! I feel better about it having dremelled, snipped, cut and torn them... including ripping the silly spring out. Using Tortoise motors BTW.

I'd much rather have hand built them all and made them #8's or larger built into nice sweeping curves so the layout could have had almost zero straight track...... But I'll get over it if I keep telling myself it IS only a test and programming track after all. Paying nearly as much per point as it would have cost for me to make seven better looking/quality/much more correct points was unappealing too!

To me the most interesting part so far is the control panel... that will be photographable in a day or two - I'm currently wiring it :).

As time passes I will post on:

The Peco mods
The control panel (which will explain the purpose of the test track really)
The basic test track construction
Some parts of the detailing etc...

Be patient

kind regards and a very Merry Christmas to you!

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
*** A quick response on the Peco Mods. Its underway so I simply did these with Photoshop to make it clear. I will post real life images of them later

There are 3 images in the picture showing the physical changes only. (I haven't bothered with showing the electrical mods in this image, I presume all sensible modellers will do them as a matter of course)

Left - unmodified physically

centre - minimum mod: drive point via Seep or tortoise not Peco, so don't need those horrid heavy sleepers. 5 minutes work to remove them and cut off the excess on the point throwbar

lower:
* Remove the heavy sleepers totally, replace with thick C&L plastic ones or copperclad.
* Remove the heavy plastic throwbar totally, replace with narrow copperclad drilled to take the tags on the peco blades.
* Reposition the blades to give less gap between blade and stock rail for better look.
* Add 2x more prototypical looking cosmetic stretchers between blades with short bits of brass wire joined by thin plastic



Other details can then be added to taste so to speak, but the totally non-prototypical "peco look" is gone, and thats the important thing.

Merry Christmas to you all

regards

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
*** A little more info and progress information.

Here are a couple of photos of the test track itself....

The frame is a mixture of pine & pre-primed MDF square corner architrave material (saves time). Backscene is also structural so is braced 12mm MDF. The track bed proper is 12mm ply, fascias are 5mm MDF etc etc... The light switch is embedded as is the mains wiring - each end is multi-skinned to keep it tidy.

Quite heavy (about 70 kilogrammes) but no vertical supports needed at all - simply hung off the wall on linked 45 degree plates.





Frame colours match the office: I had to lower the monitor and really didn't want to invest in a new one so the unpainted monitor stand is my own creation - I am really happy with it... I need 2 monitors anyway so will look for a second monitor identical so I can repeat it!

Backdrop is simply painted very pale blue-ish Gray at present... sub-bed is of closed cell foam sheet, actual track-bed my own DCCconcepts product with correct 60 degree ballast shoulders of the same long life material, some of the pointwork has been placed to show where it will go.

I will remove areas of the closed cell foam sub roadbed to properly "Plant" my buildings - one of my pet hates is buildings that have airspace under them so I always do this - every item / building is therefore "in" the layout not on it.

The raised area at the back will be pre-made and plonked in the same way, so that walls will be embedded properly too... with stones that go INTO the ground.

The lights are high quality colour correction bulbs... 6 x 100 watt bulbs - sounds a lot but it isn't really, as it gives a natural mid-day sort of feeling to the layout with no hard shadows to detract from scenery. Not expensive either - I sell them to modellers at only $A3.50 each! (my big layout used 54 - no need for room heating at all :) :) )

Next images: The Control panel - designed with lots of LEDs and switches to allow interface of 5 different systems/computer link devices to each section. Possibly Boxing Day.

Merry Christmas to all

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #34 ·
***Merry Christmas Brian.

Beware... Recreating offices, or designing and building things for the office is one very big distraction... I also made the cabinet with printers on and the desk... many hours of sanding, filling and spraying with automotive acrylic laquers. It came out well I think but the desk top was an error - I made it in one piece including the two "bookshelf extensions" and its a double thickness of 18mm customwood throughout - not only heavy but a hugely awkward shape to move anywhere!

Overall though... A satisfying result but hours spent that should have gone into things like my layout!

How was your Christmas?

With Sue and I in Perth, Most of the family in NZ and UK, and my daughters in Helsinki and Vienna it was quiet here for once :) :) ...so I managed to slip in a couple of hours and modified all the Peco points like in the RH image in an earlier post on this thread... I'll paint then stain them in my usual way and drop an image onto the thread in the next couple of days with luck.

regards

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
*** Hi Trevor

I actually doubt whether much of anyones specific design will be clearly identified but for me, the objective of the competition was inspiraton and motivation, rather than to simply adopt any single plan as presented, so thats OK I hope. In the end I chose to reward the designs that I liked and was frankly very impressed by the efforts of some entrants...

Don't underestimate your work - its always tidy and well done... so post your images!

What I post panel wise will simply be specific to my test track and possibly different in material choices but it will not be "better" in any way.

I'm wondering if I shouldn't perhaps start a new thread for the test track progress as I want to show the point mods in detail plus my way of re-finishing them prior to laying so they don't look like RTR plastic too... followed by the tracklaying and ballasting etc etc etc. to give some ideas to newer modellers.

Should I keep the info here or perhaps go back a step and start a new one? What do you think?

Regards

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
*** Continuing the theme.

The Control Panel.

This panel is if anything reminiscent of the old days of DC - however in place of switching track sections it allows me to connect any one of three computer based programmers plus DCC or DC to any one of 5 distinct track sections.... plus prviding accessory and turnout control.

I need this flexibility to select sound programme - the flexibility of switching is because I really need to keep a loco linked to the computer while doing complex sound file creation and tuning, and in the past, a customer might drop in for a bit of help, meaning that I'd have to stop programming, losing sometimes hours of work, to help him. (You can't not help, can you!).

With the new panel, I can move the loco in question to any part of the test layout and then leave it connected to the sound programme while tuning a customers loco with a smile!

The idea was to make it a totally stand alone panel that works with the new test track.

For simplicity it will sit on my desk extension below the test track itself. It will be connected to the relevant hardware and track sections with a series of plain old RCA plugs (Digital) and Mini-Din Plugs (Tortoise and point position LEDS. There are probably more accessory switches than needed for lights, but there was space on the panel, and better more than less!



The basic Panel frame is a mixture of 12mm customwood shapes with simple edge rounding with a 3mm round-over router bit... The panel itself is 5m customwood (MDF).

Nothing special there except to note that if you take ALL nuts off standard switches etc they will easily fit through 5mm MDF far enough to secure with a nut. Paint is my standard shop fittings blue and Gray... nothing special there other than I add a "flow aid" to the acrylic paint and it brushes on beautifully smoothly. About 3 coats used on each part for a good surface.



The LEDs are our own new product - available in about 3 weeks with luck. They are a 3mm LED in a rather nice chrome surround. The ones I used were pre final spec and I needed to add resistors, however the stock will come with a resistor already in place and 250mm red/black wires, so can be used on any power supply between 9 and 15 volts quite happily with no work other than connecting them!

To make it pretty, each of my 3 PC programmers are indicated with Blue LED, DCC (via NCE PowerCab) with Green, and DCC off/DC on with red... The Point indicators will all be our own red/green bi-colour LEDs and accessory lights will be green.

By the way...

The LEDs are "on" courtesy of a 9 volt battery. Its helpful and motivational to be able to test - and see the panel look, as you go without the hassle of connecting a real power supply... and a 9 volt battery isn't enough current to burn things out badly if you make an error up so its a good easy & safe test!!

As I often do with such things, I drill for them slighty tight then ream with a rat-tail file so they simply screw into the 5mm customwood face.

The DPDT switches are our own - same as supplied to you with MASTERswitch.



The Rotary switches are 3 pole 4 position and choose between DCC source. The lower LED marked "off" is actually to turn off the DCC for that section and connect DC to it. (accomplished by a relay behind each Rotary switch)

The Printed Panels are made on the Computer. ANY competent drawing package will work fine - I happen to have Adobe pagemaker so used that, but there are many others.

I printed them onto 120GSM paper and laminated with a semi gloss lamination pouch.

Each panel was cut out by hand then they were temporarily placed on the panel to mark for drilling - this ensures that all holes are in the right place. I couldn't find my sharp punch so used a gentle tap on a fine X head screwdriver - I must say this made an excellent drill reference mark!



After the panel was marked up, the holes were made in the laminated paper panel with a punch set (using some pine as a block to punch on).

The basic wood panel was drilled for the switches then the paper panels were sprayed with permanent contact glue and they were put in place - dead easy as there are so many reference holes.



Wiring to the stage you can see now was accomplished over Boxing day and today - about 4~5 hours so far... Nothing special except a lot of use of heatshrink, both to insulate individual terminals and to act as "wire ties" to group similar purpose cables together.

There area LOT of wires in this panel because of the complex switching need - what you see now is about 50% of the final total... (There are 8 more wires to add to each rotary switch, plus the rest of the panel needs doing!

However I should stress that you should not be put off by masses of wire. What you can see is many similar joints, and its really not complicated - for example each rotary switch just repeats the one alonside it, so its lots of wire, but not lots of complexity!

In the end... it'll all be self contained and when the back panel is fixed on, all you will see is a row of RCA and Mini-Din plugs with luck!

Please feel free to ask any questions...

NEXT post in this thread - the transition from Peco standard look to a much better appearance BEFORE laying them - for both track and points.

Regards and best wishes to all for the new year

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #46 ·
*** I previously posted on proposed mods to Peco points to remove the non-prototypical parts and make them a little more realistic. Well, I've done it and can report that it took about 2-1/2 hours to modify all seven of them.

Looking at the images I should probably have removed one more Peco sleeper, but I'll leave them as in the photo as its only for a test track after all.

Modding the Points:

I did the standard wiring Mods first - these have been covered before so I won't repeat them.

For improving the look, the procedure was dead Simple.

The only tools were soldering Iron, DCCconcepts Sapphire 179 Solder, and Sapphire FLux, Our own Sprue cutters and a Dremel + a file for the sleeper strip.

Only material was 2 strips of 1.6mm fireglass PCB sleepering, which was filed to the correct width to match Peco with a dremel sanding drum - quick and easy to do.

* Remove one sleeper either side of the throw-bar. (cut with sprue cutters + use dremel for removing the mass of plastic that holds the spring etc)
* With sharp nosed pliers un-twist the tabs that hold the blades to the tie bar and remove tie bar.
* Solder two copperclad sleepers of correct width to the rails where the removed "over-wide" sleepers were (Tin each first, then the joint takes less than 1 second per rail).
* Add a thin tie bar that has been pre-drilled for the spring wire of tortoise motors. To fix the point rails to this, take the existing tabs and carefully bend back to a right angle so they sit flat on the tie bar. Again tin them before quickly soldering together.

Take the opportunity to lessen the huge gap between stock rail and open point rail.... I'd normally make it less than 2mm but client loco's often have old style wheels, so I left it wider this time... but still much less than the huge original Peco Gap!

This is the result: (As I said - I wish I'd removed one more sleeper)







After modding, I did my usual "Pre-laying peparation to the points and the track. This is quick, low cost and I think effective - it certainly saves lots of hassle compared to doing it once the track is laid.

These are the materials:
(1) An Aerosol of Gray Automotive undercoat. Any quality Brand will do.
(2) Stain # 1 - colour not really very critical - this walnut stain was on special. Add some black enamel and some rust coloured / teracotta coloured paint to make a dark brownish tint.
(3) Stain # 2 - again colour not critical but the Cedar was ideal and on special. I added much more rusty tint than black to this one as its for the rail sides.

Both were slightly thinned - about 5% but it may not be necessary for your brand... experiment. (we want them to go on easily but cover only partly - we want the aged look which is browny-gray, not a hard brown...

(4) The brush for coat # 1 - an old cheap shaving brush - anything softish is fine.
(5) the brush for coat # 2 - a coarse cheap kids brush - this was appx 50P for ten at the local stationers(I use them for flux too)



The whole procedure takes 3-1/2 steps:

(1) Spray the whole of the point or track with the Gray Aerosol. a couple of quick passes from 4 angles should cover it perfectly with a thin even coat (paint at about 300mm from can to track is about right). As soon as painting is done, clean the rail head with the end grain of a pine block. If its stubborn, wet the pine with white spitir or thinners.

(2) When totally dry (overnight) mop all over with the soft brush and stain # 1 - Not too much on the track but just slop it on and dab as well as brush.

This takes about fifteen to twenty seconds per metre or point, no more! There is no need to be careful, but keep the stain well stirred as the paint settles out. As soon as staining is done, clean the rail head with the end grain of a pine block. If its stubborn, wet the pine with white spirit or thinners.

(3) When totally dry (overnight) use the cheap kids brush to quickly paint the rail sides - do get a little on the chairs and any on the sleepers doesn't matter at all.... Rust creeps everywhere when its vibrated off chairs and rail by passing trains and we DON'tT want it to look neatly painted!

This takes about a minute per meter of track or per point, no more. - no need to be too careful, but keep the stain well stirred as the paint settles out. Not too much on the track but just slop it on and dab as well as brush. Again, as soon as staining is done, clean the rail head with the end grain of a pine block. If its stubborn, wet the pine with white spirit or thinners.

Here are the images.... Showing bare track, gray sprayed track, stain # 1 and Stain #2 stages...









(4) Well... there is NO step 4 - just clean the rail heads properly, not forgetting the inside of the railhead, and you are done. I think it makes a BIG difference (I hope you agree) and it certainly saves a LOT of time once the track is laid!

regards

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #49 ·
QUOTE (dwb @ 29 Dec 2008, 21:51) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Richard, I have one reservation about pre-painting flexible track - laying curves. My previous experience is that when the sleepers are flexed to follow the curve, the chairs move and expose the unpainted rail behind. Does this happen with your method or is the paint thin enough to seep behind the chairs so that the underlying rail is also painted?

David

Thats one reason for slightly thinning the stain mix - it will generally seep enough to cover the area, and if bare NS rail does show (and it will where I cut/file/slip on joiners) touch up takes no time at all... just reapply the stain to the area... it has enough grip on the rail to coat any tiny area.

On joiners I'll paint them with a little of the gray (using a fine brush) which will also be quick, followed by stain...

There is a second option of course to save doing touch up - cut and fit the track ready to lay, then paint as per the above... I would do this if radii were tight-ish as the action of bending can of course cause bare areas where the clips run on the rail... I haven't bothered about it this time as the test track is close to straight so there will be very little to do anyway.

Thank you for raising it - I should have thought and covered that point in my post.

Kind regards

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #52 ·
*** Hi Trevor - its each to his own on colour but I do think the gray is the best base as it allows constant subtle variance - To change look, better to vary the stain colour to change the image rather than the base. Remember too that in steam days rain/atmosphere acidity was higher in the atmosphere so a redder rust covered by muck and grime is actually correct compared to todays railway which is a deader brown look in most places....(Actually too, my pictures look more red than the rail sides really are...)

If you use a non-red stain such as a walnut and add black, only a little orange-ish colour plus a touch of white to soften the tint you'll get a dirty beige - but having the grey background really does help look less "painted" than a beige background will...

As to the rail tint, you really DO need to do the rail sides but its actually very subtle in reality - as it all totally dries the colour settles into a more brownish as time passes - once ballasted and dry brushed with powders to reflect area and traffic patterns, all the colours soften markedly.

Experiment - each of us ends up finding our way in our own way on these things... There's no wrong or right, just the CME's preference :)

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #53 ·
QUOTE (Lancashire Fusilier @ 30 Dec 2008, 13:57) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Fantastic work on the panel and points Richard. Nice catching up with the post now I have internet access. Panels are porn for me sadly


*** Cheers Paul... I can feed your habit with those new panel LEDs very soon


Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #57 ·
***Hi Sol

I drilled a 3/16 hole then slightly reamed it with the end of a rat-tail file (turning it like a drill). This gave me a suable "screw fit".
The clearance hole is 5mm.

Pricing will be finalised as they land, but they'll be quite reasonable. I don't have the shipping papers handy but colour wise Red, Green, Yellow, Blue and I think from memory they may have also shipped the White I asked for....

Richard
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top