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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

A little bit of advice needed here.

I've just set out quite a nice long stretch of track to put my Hornby Flying Scotsman to the test to see what it can do. I ran the loco with one carriage attached (from the standard Hornby Flying Scotsman starter set). It runs really well. However, I then noticed a small black elastic band, circular and just big enough to fit onto my index finger without stretching it. It was lying on the track where the train had passed over. Where is this likely to have come from and is it essential? The loco still runs perfectly.
 

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Well it sounds like it may be a traction tyre from one of the ohter hornby Locos if it is about 1/2mm thick then it probably isfrom another model.
If your models run fine then no preoblem.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
[quote name='Peter_Harvey' date='3 Apr 2007, 13:03' post='26264']
Well it sounds like it may be a traction tyre from one of the ohter hornby Locos if it is about 1/2mm thick then it probably isfrom another model.

Yes, that's the size, Peter. So probably just there by accident.

Thanks for the advice.

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Neil,

Sorry, I'm a bit confused now (I'm a real beginner at this) ... has this come out of my Flying Scotsman or did it fall into it at the factory by mistake? And if it does belong in the FS how do I put it back?

Brian
 

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QUOTE (Peter_Harvey @ 3 Apr 2007, 16:28) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>What dose Neil?

Pete
The traction tyre coming off.

After a while they lose their tightness and come off. It's probably from an older loco rather than a new one. If you look underneath at the drive wheels you can see there may be a groove in some of the wheels. If you can see this groove then the tyre is missing.
 

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Also if its is a brand new A1/A3 Scotsman Pacific then it shouldnt have a traction tyre but if its an older Scotsman then it may have one on one of the drive wheels but if it fits on your index finger then I dobut if it is from a Scotsman model.

Pete
 

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QUOTE (ironduke @ 3 Apr 2007, 09:01) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Would a traction tyre fall off a steam loco? Wouldn't it get caught by the connecting rods?

No,-the traction tyres are fitted on the tender drive versions of the A3/A4's etc,-the train sets have the old tender drive loco in them...
 

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QUOTE (DS239 @ 3 Apr 2007, 12:49) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>No,-the traction tyres are fitted on the tender drive versions of the A3/A4's etc,-the train sets have the old tender drive loco in them...

Completely agree with you DS, I would suggest getting some spares ASAP that way if it happens again you won't have to worry.

Regards

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
OK, so it's come out the tender.

The train still runs ok... so should I leave it or refit it and if so where does it go?
 

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To establish if you have a loco with traction tyres, separate the tender from the loco then:
a. The tender should be heavier than the loco

b. Turn the tender over and look at the wheels if on the R/Hand side you see a rubber O ring in a grove you have a tender drive.
"you should not celebrate by dancing this is a very crude motor" but it will tolerate some abuse so swearing is OK

c. Remove the tender top if you have a tender drive this should be loose. A bit of a waggle is all that's needed. Sometimes a gentle tap from underneath with a screw driver will help. Other types of drives have a C/Ks screw underneath which needs to be removed. You should be able to tell where the motor is by
simply holding the loco and establishing where the weight is. If you can turn the wheels of the loco easily then try this with the tender if their tight is a good
chance you have a tender drive or visa versa.

d. Assuming you have a tender drive you should now be able to see a Ringfield motor
"you can't miss it it's large and ugly" "it has the same type of weight as a hand grenade" "some people will tell you it throws better"

e. using gentle pressure of a screw drive (smallish) you should be able to gently lever out the motor from it's frame there are tags at either end of the tender
frame with some gentle leverage the motor will separate from the frame. You may be shocked that some of the wheels flop around don't be that's normal
this isn't a thing of precision it was developed for kids train sets in the 50's you probably have the hightec version


f. if you manage this and you have a spare traction tyre you could now replace it, a little bit of spit will allow you to gently ease the new tyre into the grove
spit is the worlds best lubricant - "no it wasn't developed by NASA"

g. perhaps you should look in the box and see what the instructions say - 100% of tender drives have a little leaflet about the motor, and how you should be
nice to it. There are lots of references on the net to help you

h. traction tyres can be bought from most model shops or Burnley model spares / East Kent models they come in three or four different sizes

i I always keep a few spares they can wear quite a lot, as from time to time customers want decoders in them. Even in it's updated form it's got poor torque
it's a crude motor compared with today's can motors.

j You can keep running on one traction tyre, but start to get spared now, your loco will have zero traction without them

 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Wow... that should cover it, thanks Makemineadouble...

I won't swear though... my congregation would de-rail me!

Brian
 
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