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ok another question for all you super modellers out there

what do you use for adding things like drainpipes and guttering to oo scale buildings?

and where do i get the stuff to do it?
 

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I've used black plastic-covered speaker wire for my downpipes. Works well.
My guttering is made from black card, made a bit dusty with some grey artists pastel.
There's good instructions for making gutters [and many other things]on CeeDee's Card Modelling On Barchester thread [currently on page 2 in this forum] Well worth a read. Thanks Bob
 

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Andy

Ratio do a pack of guttering, downpipes, ridge tiles and chimneys. I think it costs about £3.00. You may find this useful.

Regards

John
 

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I use the ribs and spokes from an old umbrella. The ribs make great gutters and the spokes are ok for downspouts.

I glue the gutter to a piece of card and glue the assembly under the eaves. The downspouts I attach using a thin band of card every so often as a clamp around the pipe and stick them to the wall. I then paint the clamps the same colour as the downspouts.

Richard Davies
Utah, USA
 

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See further down for the Ratio guttering and drain (down) pipes...'Weathering with watercolours', they are what I used on this model . The guttering, strangely, does not have a concave upper surface, so the trick is to stick them up under the edge of your roof, having first coloured the top surface black with a permenant felt tip marker. The drain piping (properly 'down pipes') may be bent gently with oyur fingers without heat to take up the curve that leads to the guttering. In the toilet block example below, the stack pipe to vent sewer gases and prevent waterlocks (the large, typically 6" cast iron pipe with cast socket joints, for buildings pre-70's) is a piece of stripped 0.6mm earth wire, with small pieces of suitable insulation slid on. Before cutting them from their original cable, crimp round with a pair of pliers to give a tapered appearance to the tiny pieces you cut off. When they are in the right places, run a little liquid (not gel) Superglue over each 'joint' and it will form a tiny mating curve to the wire. When dry, paint/felt tip, after supergluing tiny strips of writing paper on the back surface to represent the brackets.
Window ledges, little wraps of card, help, as does a soldier course of bricks above window openings.

Richard D's ideas re umbrella spokes is a real good'n, next one you see in a bin, snaffle it!
Bike spokes may be heated up, flattened with a hammer and the flat end filed to a diamond shape to make very thin but long drills for geting that pesky return wire to the right place...





If anyone is interested, this little scratchbuilt model contains a urinal, sink, 2 toilets, newspaper on a nail in each cubicle and a homemade 2mm high water tap. Shall I post?
 

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Excellent work Dooferdog

Regards

John
 

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Scarey!!

Regards

John
 

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Hi All, thank you,

How?

The tap

Take a piece of solid copper wire, just under 0.5 mm. Rest on a hard surface (Vice, piece of metal...) lay a masonary nail across it at right angles, tap with a hammer until just less then half thickeness. Anneal. (Heat in gas flame until slight green tinge, plunge in cold water, this very important step) Using the point of a scriber or similar make pop mark in flat oval portion and drill through with 0.5 mm drill. Take a pin, hold in hand vice and file head until very thin, push through hole in wire. Flux well and generously apply solder, then shake whilst still hot. Using micro-pliers bend spout downwards, snip off and file end flat. Snip off bottom length of pin.Result (one time out of six) a mini tap! If you are really clever, file pin head to give 4 prong or straight tap handle. (I can't see that well, I do all through a magnifying glass! In a damp atmosphere this will need a coat of clear varnish or paint or it will corrode away in 3-4 years.

Sanitary Black Brick hard standing

Have a look at some old VHS cassettes. Certain brands used this surface as 'grip' areas on the outer surfce. If you take one to bits there are all sorts of little interesting pieces in side that, when painted 'rust' make convincing junk yard clutter.

The sinks and loos

2.5mm flat earth and twin cable clips and 8mm round cable clips (The sort you nail into the wall) carved up and drilled out. (Drill slowly, with sharp Jobbers twist drill or they will melt and go all rough and eccentric)
The 'U' bend is small diameter solder wire (again, needs varnishing)

The urinal

Tank, a piece carved from a broken white 3 pin plug. (As are the cubicle tanks) The glazed tile surround, the waste from a Metcalfe model window frame. The back, white glazed card stained with water colours. The splash of water/pee? A little liqid superglue, and the pipework is stripped copper wire, some with the insulation left on.

See? Nuthin to it!

 

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Forgot to say, I'd like some suggestions on a suitable skylight roof construction so some details can be seen, tried a couple, but binned both.

Cheers,

Chubber.
 

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Cheers dd.
It seems so simple when you read it, but the cleaver bit is working it out in the first place!
Guess we are all always learning something more to add to our hobby skills!
 

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Hello dooferdog, enjoyed looking at your model accessories, making the model buildings stand out.
Being an all thumbs modeller myself - when are your models being offered for sale?
 

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Double00, I'm flattered, but I don't think it will happen! To me, the fun bit is knowing that if it goes t%ts-up, I can bin it. As I said, a tap is a one-in-six happening. I don't think I could stand the stress of doing things to order, and anyone can do the same, if they are prepared to make as many co%% ups as I do!
 

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After several tries at a ventilator/skylight, have found one I'm almost happy with. As I was asked earlier to explain 'how'...here goes, sorry if this sounds like an egg-sucking lesson and apologise for the length of this post.


1 Using a graph paper printing site, or similar, make some lined paper with 2mm (6" scale) spaced lines of 3point thickness and print in dark grey. Put that print-off in your printer, and in Photoshop or similar overprint in vellum/ingres texture, light yellowish at 50% transparency. over which you have randomly sprayed medium grey to give a mottled grubby off-white effect. This is your aged white, 5.5" tongue and grooved wood. Useful for all sorts of things. Using the end of the roof as a pattern, mark out the ends of the skylight on 2mm mount board, add the sides and cover with the paper. Cover a strip of thin card for the top [TOP TIP.....save cornflake packets or similar, NOT for the card as such, but for the beautifully formed straight folds which make a long thin folded component a doddle, I use it for all my smaller roofs]. Make ends and side covered with yourpaper.

Now....this took the longest to work out.
Give up on acetate film for the glazing.


Cut the material for both of the glazed panels in one piece, from 1mm plastic glazing sheet similar to that sold for green houses etc.(Yes, I know it's over scale thickness...) It's pricey, so I scrounged mine from a sign-maker. Accurately scratch the lines that your bars will take up on the plastic with a sharp thingy and then wash clean of finger grease, dust etc and dry.. Cut enough 2mm strips of paper from your grubby white paper to form all the glazing bars, and then get a bit silly.....
Pour some liquid super glue into a tin lid, or other suitable flat shallow container, spread it out, and holding both ends of your strips, dip/run them through the shallow puddle of S'Glue. Lower them over the plastic sheet in the right place and let go! Count on making 2-3 attempts before you get a reasonable one!
You can press them down with the end of a needle/pin. When they are all done and dry, cut through the middle with a fine saw and wrap and glue (PVA) the ends and top strip. God, that sounds never ending....

Glue the assembly onto the roof (S'Glue gel) and cut carefully round the inside. To do the lead flashing, cut the gum strip off of Rizla papers, lay/hold in place, with tweezers, and stick down by wiping over wth a small SOFT paintbrush dipped in water and shaken out. Rub over with a 4B lead pencil when absolutely dry. If you want a lighter grey lead, rub over/polish with a cotton bud lightly moistened with meths.

Well, hope that helps......anyone know how to wire Peco diamond crossings????????

 
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