Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, it seems as soon as I finish a track plan, everything changes! My partner and I are buying a house, and within it I'll be able to use a whole floor for my train obsession. I'll be able to benefit from around 450 sq ft of space.

I have plans to install floor heating, light wood floors, I was wondering if there was anything I should ask my architect to also put in place.

Any suggestions?

See the space below:











 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,497 Posts
I don't know much about Belgian building construction, only British, but from what I can see this appears to be an industrial building which has been converted.
The Belgian equivilent of our Building Regulations may need to be looked at - for example I would expect you will need to improve the access - Protect the opening with some sort of balustrade (posts and handrail) and a spiral staircase??

You will need to tidy up the underside of the roof: remove the bits of slotted strapping which I assume once held up a false ceiling and possible improve the lining under the roof to keep heat in Winter and out in Summer. Also to ensure dirt, dust etc. cannot be blown in via the roof.

Install lighting and power and you should be OK.

Best wishes - I wish I had that much room!
John Webb
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,854 Posts
Hi Kimbo,

Not much I can add to John's advice other than to reinforce his comments about insulation. The biggest enemy of railway modelling is an unstable environment both in terms of temperature and humidity. The less temperature variation the better. Your underfloor heating will be ideal provided you insulate the roof properly.

As regards power I came across a gizmo at a DIY store today which, if not actually made for railway modelling, is certainly ideal for this application. It's called Eubiq Powertrack and is basically an electrical contact strip into which you can insert power and data sockets of various types at any point along it's length. It comes in various lengths between 600mm and 1200mm and these can be joined together to provide a continuous strip up to 3200mm long. Have a look at their web site at http://www.eubiq.com/

I am certainly going to get some, not just for my layout room, but for all around the apartment. No more multi adaptors for me.

Regards,

Expat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
I remember Bob Symes demonstrating the powertrack on a Tomorrows World inventers edition many years ago. I always wondered what happened to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,497 Posts
MK, Crabtree and other UK electrical accessory makers have had this sort of power trunking available for commercial and industrial use for many years. I use a varient in my kitchen for running the kettle, toaster etc with minimum cabling needs.

As IT has become more important, trunking has developed with separate compartments for IT cabling and sockets. (In the UK it is a requirement of our Building Regulations that wiring in buildings complies with BS 7671 'Requirements for Electrical Installations'. In turn that BS requires power cables and other cables carrying extra-low voltage signals to be kept apart by at least 50mm (2 inch) or separated mechanically, which the multi-compartment trunking does.)

Regards,
John Webb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the quick analysis fellas.

I'd imagine that Belgian building regs aren't half as stringent or prescriptive as the UK's....

We'll definetely be putting in a staircase, since the building doesn't have one! The whole place has to be renovated in any case as it was indeed an industrial complex which is now being renovated into private housing, so all the floors of our new property look exactly like that... Unfortunately I think we may have a year to look at before we move in!

In terms of this power track, what does it add in terms of benefits vs a traditional construction??? Is it costly??
 

·
No Longer Active.
Joined
·
13,319 Posts
QUOTE (poliss @ 11 May 2008, 19:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I remember Bob Symes demonstrating the powertrack on a Tomorrows World inventers edition many years ago. I always wondered what happened to it.

These systems come & go. Good idea but until there is a standard so that you are not tied to one manufacture they will not, in my opinion be adopted en-masse.

They always seem to be expensive.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,845 Posts
I would make some allowance in your budget for some blinds for those Velux roof lights to provide some shade on all those sunny days you get in Belgium. Coincidently there was a TV ad for Velux blinds by Velux (if you see what I mean) tonight and the implication of one shot is that you can remote controlled ones? Handy if you have cut off access with a wide baseboard.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ooh indeed, if they have automated, reasonably priced one, no reason why we shouldn't put it in our budget!


How much space do you guys think is needed for a cozy sitting area??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,497 Posts
QUOTE (Kimbo @ 11 May 2008, 21:31) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>....I'd imagine that Belgian building regs aren't half as stringent or prescriptive as the UK's....

....In terms of this power track, what does it add in terms of benefits vs a traditional construction??? Is it costly??
Re the Building Regs - I'd quietly check - there is considerable pressure for uniform regs within the EU and you may find the Belgian ones are tougher than you think.

The 'power track' has the advantage of quick installation and of being easily modified thereafter, but the componants are pricey compared to the traditional sockets and conduit or small trunking containing the wire linking them. The latter will be cheaper to buy but the installation may take longer to do, thus costing more in labour. Having no idea of prices and labour costs in Belgium I cannot be more specific.

Regards,
John Webb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
High labour costs in Belgium, but as the whole thing is going to be renovated to be turned into living space there are available subsidies and our loan should cover the costs for us to turn the space into a dream layout room


The work will be handled by a professional architect, so I think the question of building regs and things should be covered!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Jaysus, that's an awesome space.

Make sure you get it in writing from your partner that

1.the room will be for the exclusive use of model railway and possibly you may invite them up if they wish.
2.you may keep the room in whatever state you are happy with

I would also hire an architect who likes model railway.

If model making, a sink and wash area is always useful for preping stuff.

Plenty of cable trunking, lots of power points and all the other stuff everyone else ahs said.

have fun with the cavern. Fill every centimetre with fun

basil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Haha! Will do!

Do you guys think it may be useful to consider a space for painting models and things?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,497 Posts
QUOTE (Kimbo @ 13 May 2008, 05:48) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>....Do you guys think it may be useful to consider a space for painting models and things?

Good idea. A work bench area separate from the layout is always useful. If the layout is to be around the room then the bench might go in the middle. Alternatively use a corner, say by your access stairs, which otherwise might be difficult to use for the railway.

Al alternative used by some is to have a mobile workbench that can be pushed under the layout to maximise room when you are operating rather than constructing.

Regards,
John Webb
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,845 Posts
QUOTE Do you guys think it may be useful to consider a space for painting models and things?

If you're considering going that far, think about some air extraction equipment but also bear in mind that systematically venting noxious chemicals may be in breach of some regulations or other. By "systematically" I mean that by installing extraction equipment it is clear that you intend to do it, rather than "happen" to do it when the urge comes on to do some painting and you point a fan out a window, if you see what I mean.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Cheers for that advice, indeed, I was thinking about those spray-paint booths... I doubt the space would have the right type of ventilation unless I do something to make it happen... but if it falls foul of regs or raises eyebrows, that'd be worrisome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
QUOTE (dwb @ 13 May 2008, 17:37) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>If you're considering going that far, think about some air extraction equipment but also bear in mind that systematically venting noxious chemicals may be in breach of some regulations or other. By "systematically" I mean that by installing extraction equipment it is clear that you intend to do it, rather than "happen" to do it when the urge comes on to do some painting and you point a fan out a window, if you see what I mean.

David
And this can be called a 'clean air cupboard' like the ones use in a lab and can be construced easily enough. It is a sealed cupboard apart from a openable glass front which is linked to an extraction fan and draws any fumes directly out. Really only needed if doing a lot of work with solvents etc (but a must if you are)

Ah to have such a space

Daydream bubble
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Would it be easy to install at a later stage?? I doubt I'd be going into painting anytime soon, considering the space I have, it might take a few years just to get the wood-work and base track up!

Since I'm creating a freelance layout, I'm planning to have my own paint schemes for my trains though, so I'll definetely be doing a bit of painting at some point!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
QUOTE (Kimbo @ 17 May 2008, 21:37) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Would it be easy to install at a later stage?? I doubt I'd be going into painting anytime soon, considering the space I have, it might take a few years just to get the wood-work and base track up!

Since I'm creating a freelance layout, I'm planning to have my own paint schemes for my trains though, so I'll definetely be doing a bit of painting at some point!

If redoing a part of an outside wall or roof, you should have an extractor vent installed (and a blank put in instead of a motor etc). This can be sealed off with a closed vent cover and later on opened up if necessary. It is similar to installing a kitchen extractor when you do get around to it. Imagine the kitchen extractor in a glass cupboard with an opening front. You work at the bench with the extractor on and the fumes are taken via the hood.

Look up laboratory clean air benches on the web.

Looking foward to seeing the results.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top