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· Just another modeller
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9,967 Posts
*** if I was building it for me, I'd allow perhaps 0.1mm at ends and n more than 0.5 on centre, but I do not know your track-work laying skills, radii or intentions for the drawbar design... so I'd follow the article as you have started to do, perhaps erring on the conservative side and leaving a little more.

Richard
 

· Just another modeller
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9,967 Posts
***Yes, - the tyre/flange vs railhead relationship also has some slop in it, so that will be fine. Thin metal washers need to be properly flat = etched not stamped - so you may have none - consider making the washer from thin styrene sheet if its to prevent shorts... easy to do by making a couple of round punches from brass tube.

BTW - a slightly wider BTB than 14.5 may well be better with those wheel-sets - they are finer than wheels were when the 14.5 standard was created. Experiment when ready for track testing.

Richard
 

· Just another modeller
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9,967 Posts
*** Very probably Dapol's "any plastic will do" approach - shrinkage can be significant if plastic choice isn't what the tool was designed for - that plus lack of temperature control of the tooling during production are much of the reason why Dapol kits are rarely as good as the original Airfix models made using the same tools.

Richard
 

· Just another modeller
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9,967 Posts
*** Oh well...

Never mind - centralise it and the difference will be minor - the option is a lot of work.

Richard
 

· Just another modeller
Joined
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9,967 Posts
*** None of Sean's suggestions are really ideal unless you have a fine FG brush (propelling pencil size) and definitely don't use any of the liquids unless you are exceptionally careful. They will wick along the rail and knobs and wreck the body finish. both of Sean's stripper suggestions are far too slow.

if it was me I'd pick at it around the detail of the knobs with an 00 or 000 brush moistened only with soething quick acting like acetone - dip the brush in it and then touch the brush to something absorbent to just leave it damp. Use a fine brush and make sure its natural fibres - any synthetic brush will be damaged by acetone. be patient and it will all eventually come away. Have a second clean brush and alternate, removing all paint between swaps.

If you do not have a really fine sable or camel hair brush you can control (and are prepared to stress with solvent), soak a couple of toothpicks in hot water for a few minutes then crush the end like a primitive brush. neaten with scissors, soak in thinners or acetone, touch to absorbent surface to remove any excess and worry at the detail with it.

Once the knobs are clear a dampened brush will soften the paint on the handrail...

take it slow and be patient.

When you are finished take a trip to the local gunsmith. Buy some "Birchwood Casey metal black for antique firearms or standard gun blue if they have none. Other brands will work too. brush onto the NS and neutralise as it darkens with cotton buds and water. Much better than painting them.

Richard
 
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