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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. In building my layout I have come across the following (quite specific) problems. I wonder if anyone else has and, if so, what they have done to combat them. I am using Peco Code 100 flexitrack throughout, and Peco turnouts/crossings
1) I find some rolling stock will just NOT RUN over some track joins, turnouts etc. I have a particular problem with the new Hornby coaches, one Bachmann loco and some trucks. My tactic is to run trains at full-pelt over and over the track to make sure all is well. Am I right in thinking that there is just some rolling stock that is incompatible with some trackwork and taht nothing can be done?
2) I have avoided the usual mistakes -laying points over baseboard-joins and so on - but still some are intemittently problematic. Is it the case that 'dodgy' points can be improved with judicious filing and lubricating?
3) Is it a good idea to ballast all rolling stock to reduce risk of derailments?
4) How paranoid should I be about minor fluctuations in level/straightness? Is it worth getting the spirit-level and cotton out, or is it best, generally, to rely on one's eye?
 

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Layouts run badly because the stock isn't to a common set of standards... Look at the wheelsets, this is more often the problem than not... Often they are not properly spaced in back-to-back (the distance between the backs of the two wheels).

Presuming your models are all less than ten years old with current profile hornby/bachmann wheelsets, strike a back to back of 14.5 and make sure ALL of the wheelsets meet this standard. you can pull/twist each axle set to adjust. If you have some heavier in the wheels, make those wagons 14.3mm back to back. (better to replace those older wheelsets with current ones though)

The other thing to do is add ten thou styrene (about 0.25mm) to the inside of each check rail and smooth the ends so they blend with the checkrails/paint accordingly - this will help guide the wheels properly through the sloppy Pec Frogs.

re weight -strike a common weight for all 4 wheel wagons and then multiply that to find the weight for coaches and bogie stock - use a standard formula, something like 4 wheel wagons - x grammes, bogie stock = x grammes plus y grammes per 100mm.

Richard
 

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Excellent advice above. I've change all the wheels of my wagons and it has made a great difference. I also ad weight to all wagons. None of my most recent wagons from both big UK manufacturers were perfectly in-gauge.

Track joins should be smooth to the touch on the top and on the inside of the rails. It helps not to nail down points and thus buckle them. I lightly set them in place with PVA. I can always remove them later if needed with a simple dig or two with a putty knife.
 

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Richard is of course spot on,especially regarding back-to-back measurements. You may also wish to read Railway Modelling the Realistic Way by Iain Rice (currently on sale on Amazon for c. UKP13 or borrow from local library) in which he outlines how to test axle friction using a sloping test track, weight rolling stock to a common weight etc. Some good practical, detailed advice for improving running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Many thanks for that advice. I thought it odd that some stuff - even some of my REALLY ancient and battered wagonry runs all day with no probs and other stock leaps off the track at the first opportunity. I will de-nail my points forthwith ... although it's not actually the points which cause most of the problems.
Richard, what do you mean by:

"Presuming your models are all less than ten years old with current profile hornby/bachmann wheelsets, strike a back to back of 14.5 ..."?

Apols for appaling ignorance.

M
 

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The term "back to back" means the distance from the back of the wheel at one end of the axle to the back of the wheel at the other end of the axle. Or to put it another way the distance between the flat faces on the inside of the wheels on an axle.

David
 

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QUOTE (Mike H. @ 28 Nov 2008, 15:57) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Many thanks for that advice. I thought it odd that some stuff - even some of my REALLY ancient and battered wagonry runs all day with no probs and other stock leaps off the track at the first opportunity. I will de-nail my points forthwith ... although it's not actually the points which cause most of the problems.
Richard, what do you mean by:

"Presuming your models are all less than ten years old with current profile hornby/bachmann wheelsets, strike a back to back of 14.5 ..."?

Apols for appaling ignorance.

M

Hi Mike,

As Richard and DWB have given you excellent advice on the back to backs maybe a diagram of the wheels will help their meaning the thick black arrowed line where to measure the back to backs, click on the thumbnail to enlarge it.
 

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Hi !

I have just found this site and as an inexperienced railway modeller the following may be well known to you and previously discussed. So apologies if I am going over old ground.

I had derailing problems with a five car rake of Hornby Pullmans. I checked and double checked the back to backs and was satisfied they were correct.

Problems continued and at the 2007 Warley Show I asked a Hornby Staff Member for advice. He told me that there had been a problem with some pullmans derailing due to the clever cam arrangement that shortens the distance between coaches on straight sections of track. I returned the pullmans to Hornby and they changed the bogies for a newer design at no charge. Problem solved, and my thanks to Hornby for fantastic Customer Service.

RDH
 

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Hi & welcome to MRF.

No problem at all reiterating problems - new people are arriving all the time & I'm sure the problem/cure will be new to some people.

Enjoy the hobby & the forum.
 
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