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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I note the existence of at least three levels of decoder. The mini series which seem to be rated at about 0.5 amps, the standard series at about 1.5 amps & larger decoders for the big scales.

I would interpret the above a meaning that mini decoders were for "N" & that standard decoders were for "OO" yet I understand many users have mini decoders in their "OO" locomotives.

I am capable of finding the stalled current of my motors but I do wonder if this is what others use to determine the capacity of decoder required for a particular loco.

Am I going to get problems if I put mini series decoders in commercial "OO" locos as they are obviously easier to fit in some cases?

Chris
 

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The motor's peak current use will be when the loco's gears are stalled. Not just when the loco runs into a buffer. Most OO locos will draw over 1 amp when stalled. If you think you will never stall the motor and gears, then install it as the nominal draw will be well under 0.5 amp.

Take a look at some of the reviews that I did where I measured the current draw whilst performing horrid experiments on the locos. This one for example: A4 Review.

To stall, you have to jam or block the wheels or gears. Even going up an incline with an overloaded train will just spin the drive wheels...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Doug

The lack of ability to stall the motor in use is the reason I wondered if the stall test was relevant.

Thanks for the answer

Chris
 

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Most of my loco's have Z scale decoders in them, I've also got an 0 gauge loco with an N scale decoder in it. While the stall current should be used to determine which decoder you use, but like Doug says if you're not gonna be stalling the loco then it isn't as important. I generally find that a 1amp decoder will do for pretty much anything in N or 4mm scale.
 
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