Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 5 of 62 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have consistently read reports in the model press letters pages about the problems of UK modern models. I would say that the running issues resolve into 3 areas.

Firstly that some modern locos whilst smoother running are not as powerful as those of yesteryear.

Secondly that modern shallow flange depths are much more likely to cause derailments that the coarser wheels of a few years ago

Thirdly that Code 75 rails makes the flange problem worse.

What does the jury here have to say. It it just letter writers are the vociferous complaining minority with poor track work or are there real issues here?

Chris
 

· Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (Gary @ 9 Mar 2006, 21:41).........Of course DCC does not like traction tyres.........
Happy modelling
Gary
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Both analogue & DCC control require there to be a good electrical path between the loco & the track so why do you say DCC does not like traction tyres? There is no obvious difference.

On the question I originally posed there does seem to be a feeling, if I am reading this correctly, that model development has not been a win win situation.

Chris
 

· Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Gary,

I don't think that we are fundamentally disagreeing here. The important thing is a nice steady stream of electricity to the motor & electronics. A traction tyre effectively removes one wheel from those available to collect that flow & thus can make a pick up problem more likely.

Dave,

My very very limited experience (so far) of new models is all diesel & they all work OK. reading the posts above it does seem that the problem is steam. It has always been the bogies of steam locos that are the most prone to derailing & it seems nothing has changed. I remember as a kid experimenting to see if I could put a bit of load on a front bogie to hold it onto the track. Having worked with 15" gauge they have the same problems!

Chris
 

· Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
QUOTE (Ozzie21 @ 12 Mar 2006, 07:33)With most RTR run models the the guage of the wheels is usually out, I think you use back to back measurment. ......... On Hornby and Bachmann models as well as many American models, which are mainly made in China as well, the "back to back" I guess is to narrow allowing the wheels to ride up in point frogs and strike point rails. So I adjust them all and they all run fine on my code 75. If after you check and reguage your wheels they still derail I'd start checking my trackwork.

Ozzie21
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I think what you are saying is that as supplied they don't run properly on the track as supplied but perhaps a little worn. This is not a good basis for a consumer item. I agree with Gary. Yes rivets are important but to many users good running matters more than the last 1% or even 5% of accuracy.

Chris
 

· Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
QUOTE (Gary @ 13 Mar 2006, 10:59)Now for those who have tail chasing oval layouts who like to run there trains continuously for hours on end then good layout design is very important. Always run against the point if you operate continiously and you probably won't go far wrong with any loco. Keep shunting areas away from the main running area. Avoid diamond crossings and uncoupling ramps on main lines. And so on.

Common sense really.

Happy modelling
Gary
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Gary yes it is good operating practice as well but a bit unfortunate if you love is single track branch lines.

Why does the ideal layout begin to sound like a train set oval with one set of points to get to a shunting yard/ engine shed that you rarely go near for fear of derailing on the points. This does not really make for interesting operation but looks wondeful on the model shop shelf.

Modern real world track layouts are far simpler than those of old & I wonder if we are being forced the same way regardless of the era that we model. In fact the era with the most complex track plans is the one with the locos least able to run on them.

Chris
 
1 - 5 of 62 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top