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In depth idiot
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am sure some will recall that on the 5th November ("Remember, remember"...) 2018, a 40,000+T loaded ore train working to Port Hedland WA developed a system fault (or faults) which led to the train automatically stopping, and the driver calling in a problem. While the driver was attempting to manually make the train safe by applying the wagon brakes, it began to roll, and developed an impressive velocity powered by gravity alone, until control took the decision to put it through a crossover at a safe location, derailing almost all the vehicles. Major win for which all should be grateful: no one even slightly injured. Big heap of wrecked vehicles and iron ore in the desert, hey, it's only money.

Now naturally the Australian Transport Safety Board embarked on an investigation: but approaching three years later, still no final report, now to be issued Q4 2021. I am just so curious to read the incident analysis and recommendations. Will we see a recommendation that all train crew on these workings should have ground level capable ejector seat and parachute systems? Had whatever was the critical failure occurred while the train was moving, anyone on board would be stuck with riding into the eventual crash, with 'fingers crossed' the sole protection available...

 

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I recall this incident, it sparked rather too many keyboard warriors in another place!
It really gets me when folks who take no interest whatsoever in foreign railways, suddenly become armchair experts when something like this occurs.
Sorry!
As to any report recommendations, I could only speculate but I would think they would tighten up regular procedures and/or inspections.
Cheers,
John E.
 

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In depth idiot
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
...It really gets me when folks who take no interest whatsoever in foreign railways, suddenly become armchair experts when something like this occurs...
Then again a railway is a railway wherever in the world it is. (My own interest in the operational safety aspect is based on experience on a range of manufacturing plant processes, which presented significant hazard to life and property.)

And the question that was first in my mind regarding this incident was this. Were I questioned at an enquiry into this event, how to answer 'Was it a reasonable expectation that a single man could manually apply sufficient brakes on a 240+ vehicle near 3km long train, to make it safe against unintended movement should all the powered brake systems fail?'.

No.
 

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And the question that was first in my mind regarding this incident was this. Were I questioned at an enquiry into this event, how to answer 'Was it a reasonable expectation that a single man could manually apply sufficient brakes on a 240+ vehicle near 3km long train, to make it safe against unintended movement should all the powered brake systems fail?'.

No.
It was only when I quoted you that I saw your answer to your own question!

I agree, it is NOT a reasonable expectation for a single person to be able to do such a task.
In fact, such a proposition is frankly, ridiculous.
 

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In depth idiot
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It was only when I quoted you that I saw your answer to your own question...
I am all for folks being able to make their own decision without influence. Quite often the result is disappointing, but it is valuable information nonetheless. We have had a great illustration recently in Covid of what poor decisions in the seats of power cost; and this is a huge challenge for the future of an unavoidably increasingly integrated world.
 
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