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The new models to be developed by Bachmann over the next 18 months or so were announced at the London Toy Fair and feature in a news story HERE

There were plenty of examples of yet to be released products on display at the London Toy Fair and of course many of these are pre-production samples are not up to production standards. When viewing the images in the gallery you should take this into account. Yes thats right. The models will be even better than in the pictures!

The picture gallery showing all the hottest most wanted Bachmann product is through the link below:-

Gallery of Products at the London Toy Fair

Bachmann provided delivery schedules and other information for several of their locomotives and items of rolling stock:-

Ivatt 2MT 2-6-0 loco - June
BR Class 4MT 2-6-0 loco - Junish
Class 47 Diesel Loco - May June
Class 150 - Not dropped
Hoppers - Not far away

After Dennis Lovett had kindly offered to open up the cabinets to permit pictures to be taken we sat down and much of discussion was taken up by how inaccurate models really are! Apparently rivet counters have got it entirely wrong. Every loco has different numbers of rivets in different places. The loco built on a Monday would have rivets more tightly spaced than the loco built on a Friday! When you are next at a Crewe Steam Festival and you have several identical lcomotives side by side check it out for yourself!

Paint is another big issue among modellers. We were fortunate to have Padraig Murphy of Murphy Models at the table who is Ireland's leading distributer of Irish ready to run locomotives and rolling stock (More on this in another topic). Mr Murphy was giving us examples of locomotives in Ireland which had two colour schemes on each side of the loco. Apparently a lot of locomotives in Ireland run East to West and back and there are no turntables. This means that like the moon one side of the loco is in constant sunlight and one side in constant shadow. The same for coaches and wagons of course. Now just imagine what this does to the locos paintwork! And these same locos do the same run for several years.

And in the old days paint colours were mixed by hand. No computers. There was absolutely no gaurantee that the next batch of paint would be the match exactly the shade that you were working with. And because the air was contaminated with soot the paint inevitably became darker as it got towards the boittom of the tin. So a coach may well have several shades of paint on one side and thats even before it has seen the light of day!

And paint runs were common when the livery was applied. Nothing was perfect. Paint would dribble everywhere. And then you get the effects of bird excrement as you are painting. You can't wipe it off so you mix it in to the paint. Now you can imagine what effect this has on the area thats been painted.

Next time you hear somebody tell you the paint colour is wrong you know what to do! Just tell them about the bird ****

There are two preserved Fairburn tanks built at the same factory. Yet they both have entirely different dimensions! One has a boiler 40mm longer than the other and it is impossible to swap the boilers over which the owners were planning to do as part of an overhaul. Now when checking prototypes what do you do when you discover dimensional differences in the same class that you are going to model? Some modeller somewhere will either say the boiler is too short or the boiler is too long! And this has been claimed for the same model!

You can guess that an interesting discussion was had by all and I would like to thank both Padraig and Dennis for keeping me entertained for longer than they should have!

Hopefully this goes some way to helping you to understand why models take as long as they take to produce. More time is spent working out compromises and head scratching than in actually building the pre-production sample of every model Bachmann bring you!

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
PS Must not forget Underground Ernie. Some of Underground Ernie's buildings could be useful. They are modelled exactly on the buildings in the TV series so any of you who are Underground Ernie fans will know exactly what to expect!

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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I cant agree about the poor paint jobs. peole who apply paint to coaches have always been highly skilled craftsmen.

There are any number of variations of any given paint scheme but the actual aplication of the paint was an art that i fear has been lost to all but a very few these days.

I would single out Swindon for its loco's and Wolverton for its coaches as being the finest anywhere in the world for their paint jobs. even back then the paint was applies in a fairly clean environment.

both at the works and the depots where the stock was allocated would have taken great pride in the top link engines. at kings cross, if an A4 got a chip in the paint it was touched up bloddy quick before the forman saw it!

The bird excriment!!?? can you emagine a paint run at wolverton? I think several people might actually have passed away if they saw a paint run in the side of a coach!

In most works coach painting was done on 2 tracks. th painters in the middle. the coach would be pushed into position on one track and one side painted then pushed out onto a traverser and have the other side done as it came back the other way!

Paint was usually mixed at the beginning of the monday shift at wolverton and so some of the ingredients aged throughout the week. so although paint was consistent on one side that side might not match the other side if the painters were not working fast enough!

paint degredation is a long subject in itself. the degredation of the paint was not due the the poor air but due to oxidisation of the paint. that was a far bigger problem then than it was with modern pigments.

Paint was very different from batch to batch but a top link paint job would hav been (and still is) applied with great care.

I could go on about this for ages and ages but if you want a better description than i can offer then take a look at David Jenkinsons book coaching stock 1902-1945 (i think those dates are right) it has a whole chapter on the subject.

I can only dream of being as good as the masters of swindon and wolverton but here are my attempts.





Peter
 

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QUOTE peole who apply paint to coaches have always been highly skilled craftsmen

Totally agree 100%.

Throw in a works foreman who is under pressure from the top, the elements, wind, dust, paint colour variations, etc and the fact they do it for a living and have targets. Highly skilled craftsman can do a reasonable job quickly. It would take forever to do a perfect job. There would have to be compromise somewhere.

My brother in law does not compromise when he decorates at home. I listen to what he has done and think he is crazy and tell him so but thats another story! He takes 2 weeks to decorate one room! I take two days!

He is a perfectionist with no kids in the house to feed. I am practical and have a family to feed!


Happy modelling
Gary
 

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QUOTE (pedromorgan @ 30 Jan 2007, 06:23) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I cant agree about the poor paint jobs. peole who apply paint to coaches have always been highly skilled craftsmen.
I think that must be history now, judging by the paint work on some of One's 317s.
 

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WAGN was a slattern of an operator , its stations on the GN side were shockingly down at heel and as for "ghost" livery - 315s turned out to traffic in white undercoat because the TOC couldn't make up its mind what new livery it was going to adopt ... words fail me. Grubby "ghost" is still worse.

First Great Eastern was a much more house proud operator, its stations ***** and span and well painted.

One , from what Ive seen seem to have some very smart vehicles in the new livery . I assume the 317s you're thinking about are the ones that haven't yet gone through Ilford paint shop for repaint into the new colours

GNER are smart. Central are ok externally but the interiors are scruffy - probably because they tend to flog their 158s and Turbostars to death on Norwich /Liverpool and Stansted /Birmingham

Virgin have got a lot better since they swapped their old stock for Voyagers and Pendolinos

Certainly long ago there were variations in paint formulations : Doncaster and Darlington apple green being cases in point .

However the standard of painting of new coaches and vehicles at general overhaul in major works like Swindon, Wolverton, York, Derby up until WW2 was very high indeed, with up to 10 coats, lovingly applied and rubbed down. They did take forever - up to 14 days to paint a vehicle

Certain vehicles would fade (blues being particularly bad) and over time as extra coats of varnish were applied at overhaul , colours would darken

Wagons - well nobody ever cared much about them

There are also - as noted - a mass of detailed variances from loco to loco - and people thse days do seem to expect you to get each detail right
 

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The delivery schedule makes pretty gloomy reading for those of us involved with modern image:

150 "not dropped" !!!!!!

Announced 12 months ago - and from the sound of it not likely to appear in 2007.

Well , I suppose I feel even more comfortable about my unfinished Bratchill kit . When I bought it someone told me I was a mug "'cos Bachmann are doing the 150". I reckon I'll have it finished and in service at least a year before anyone sees a Bachmann 150

The 4-CEP isn't even mentioned
 

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Don't forget that a lot of modern liveries are not paint at all but laser cut vinyl. The only place to see quality paintwork these days is on the preserved railways!!

Regards

John
 

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QUOTE (Ravenser @ 30 Jan 2007, 12:27) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>One , from what Ive seen seem to have some very smart vehicles in the new livery . I assume the 317s you're thinking about are the ones that haven't yet gone through Ilford paint shop for repaint into the new colours
There are few that are still devoid of anything resembling a livery, and on some you can see the previous (WAGN) livery through the current 'top' coat.
 

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QUOTE and on some you can see the previous (WAGN) livery through the current 'top' coat.

Now I know why some of the old Lima Class 47's and other Lima locos have a similar appearance!

They are protypical!


Happy modelling
Gary
 

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Like the 3 car Blue grey 108 with 4 character headcode. I know they are not the same but it will do as a substitute for a 107 for me! Any idea when 3 car 108 available?

Like Ravenser I despair of the "not dropped" description against the 150. I really do wonder what work Bachmann does before announcing new models. Looks to me that in most cases the catalogue is little more than a statement of intent with no real research carried out and no production slots at the factory.

Why does this matter? Well Bachmanns statement of intent may well put off other manufacturers. So , given the duplication of LMS 4-6-0s this year, I would really suggest that Hornby might like to have a go at a 150. After all , from this could spawn 150/2,317,318,455 multiple units(DCC Ready please!). Start now ,announce on 1/1/08 and you may still get it into the shops before Bachmann

Russell
 
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