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DT
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Photo Dave Hadley, source Wikipedia

Bachmann Europe PLC displayed a OO gauge Peppercorn A2 Class locomotive at its Annual Trade Open Days held at it's Barwell HQ this past week-end.

The London & North Eastern Railway (LNER) built the first locomotive to the design of A.H. Peppercorn in 1947. A further 14 locomotives were completed by British Railways in 1948. Used on secondary express passenger duties on the East Coast Main Line between Peterborough and Aberdeen. These locomotives were particularly useful on lines with steep gradients and sharp curves such as the Dundee - Aberdeen and Edinburgh - Carlisle (Waverley Route). The first locomotive was withdrawn in 1962 and the last in 1966. One locomotive (No. 60532 'Blue Peter') has been preserved and is currently being overhauled.

Initially three versions of the locomotive will be produced as follows:

No.525 'A.H.Peppercorn' in LNER green
No.60532 'Blue Peter' in BR green with late crest
No.60537 'Batchelors Button' in BR green with early emblem

Although Bachmann inherited the old Trix /Liliput tooling when it purchased the Liliput company in 1992, the tooling for the A2 was badly worn and could not be reintroduced. This model will encompass new locomotive tooling, the tender tooling for which already exists.

Further details will be announced in due course with the models available during 2009.
 

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QUOTE (pedromorgan @ 15 Jul 2008, 12:41) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>great news. I would love an A2.

I have to be a little cautious though. the A1 i had was very weak. i hope they can do something about that with this release.

Peter

P.S. congratulations to bachmann for keeping this one quiet!

Hi,

I bought two A1's which were weak as well, then King's Courier turned up. Great loco. So I contacted Bachmann, who for parts and a reasonable labour charge replaced the cradle and motor. The old locos are now upto scratch with the latest offering. The only change I want with the A2 is an improvement on the Cartazzi. However, this Cartazzi is better than Hornby's idea of a Cartazzi for 'OO' gauge locos (and even those which were never fitted with a Cartazzi).

I look forward to the A2. I also hope that Bachmann produce the Swindon Trans-Pennine DMU, amongst the other 2009 products.

Regards,

Hugh Williams
 

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The Trix Transpennine DMU was to their "betwixt and between" 3.8mm scale, so I doubt we will see it again. In their latter days they were mixed with the remains of the first type of Swindon InterCity unit , which makes things more complicated.

It's to be hoped the A2 sells well. Both the Bachmann A1 and K3 had concerns with the initial batch , and since then Bachmann have steadfastly refused to touch anything LNER . This at least means they are willing to consider apple green engines again, and if it sells well , we may get some medium sized LNER engines , which are badly needed
 

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This news has just made my day
put me down for an A.H. Peppercorn

Whist I could say it's about time I'll instead settle for nice one Bachmann. I'll even settle fpr one that's on a par with their A1 and no better although I know that won't be the case it'll be a whole lot better.
When can I buy one? I want it now!
(I'm just a big kid a heart)

Andii

OK having thought about it for at least 5 or 6 minutes I think I'll probably get more than one, what can I say? I'm weak
 

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I'll buy one


David
 

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QUOTE (Ravenser @ 15 Jul 2008, 13:41) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>It's to be hoped the A2 sells well. Both the Bachmann A1 and K3 had concerns with the initial batch , and since then Bachmann have steadfastly refused to touch anything LNER . This at least means they are willing to consider apple green engines again, and if it sells well , we may get some medium sized LNER engines , which are badly needed
The advertised names cover the major variations in external appearance too I think. Good looking machines, should think they will sell well. Regarding the need for other LNER types I am a little impatient for Bachmann to get on with their announced intention to upgrade the split chassis models, the V2 and B1 in particular. I am surprised they have not simply done a new chassis for the B1 as the original Replica tooling is still holding up very well.

QUOTE (Hugh Williams @ 15 Jul 2008, 12:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I also hope that Bachmann produce the Swindon Trans-Pennine DMU, amongst the other 2009 products.
QUOTE (Ravenser @ 15 Jul 2008, 13:41) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The Trix Transpennine DMU was to their "betwixt and between" 3.8mm scale, so I doubt we will see it again. In their latter days they were mixed with the remains of the first type of Swindon InterCity unit , which makes things more complicated.
Didn't Dapol have that tooling and issue a short run 2 or 3 years ago? Grounds for optimism here, if Bachmann's 105 DMU repeats the success of the 108, I would expect a steady stream of further DMU types, and the Trans-Pennine always was the best looking design among the DMU's of its' era.
 

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Yay, looking foreward to 2013 when Bachmann get it to the market....
I was really hoping Hornby would grab that one, I think they just do a much better job of the pacifics. Bachmann would do better with an 04, they nailed the 9F so I was hoping that they would tackle the LNER's most prolific heavy hauler. Never mind, A2 is great, just make sure you do a good job Mr Bachmann. If it doesn't trump the Hornby A3 you'll be wasting a lot of time.

Cheers
Paul M
 

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Personally, I always thought that the single chimney A2 was one of the finest looking, best proportioned, locomotives to grace British metals (and no LNER supporter here). Obviously Blue Peter will be a commercial success, but I always reckoned the double blastpipe made them look a bit like A1s. I reckon both AH Peppercorn and Batchelor's Button will come with single chimneys and look great.

6991
 

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Ahem - I do hope that Bachmann do all the versions with single and double chimneys and MLS regulators. That only leaves the Thompson Pacifics which aught to be easily dealt with as the chassis is not that much different, they have the tender, and the rest - well.

I know that the Thompson A2s were somewhat unloved, but to be accurate on a 40s to 60s layout you really do need at least one!
 

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QUOTE (Saint Johnstoun @ 16 Jul 2008, 11:20) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I know that the Thompson A2s were somewhat unloved, but to be accurate on a 40s to 60s layout you really do need at least one!

My 'creative' solution to Thompson's clunker designs (pacifics, L1's) is virtual modelling: they have always 'failed' somewhere off scene, so that the train they should have worked gets a better looking substitute. There were only 16 of these pacifics anyway, a drop in the ocean of near 400 much better looking wide firebox Gresley and Peppercorn designs.

Concerning a RTR Thompson pacific, there is a problem which requires significant compromise in a model which has to run on set track curves, which relates directly to their inelegant front end. The leading bogie is positioned so far forward that the leading edge of the front bogie wheel is not far behind the buffer beam, and seen in side elevation is behind the front footsteps. The rear wheel of the bogie in side elevation is barely clear of the cylinder front. No problem for the prototype, because the sharpest curve it was expected to negotiate was 6 chains, which scales to 5 feet / 1.6 metre radius in 4mm/ft. However, the RTR model needs to get round 18"/450mm radius, and to achieve that something has got to give. Endless possibilities: undersize bogie wheels, reduced bogie wheelbase, narrower front steps, underlength cylinder block, stretch the front end of the loco body to generate enough space between steps and cylinder front, leave off the front footsteps or fix them to the bogie frame, cam the bogie pivot so that it moves forward just enough to clear the front face of the cylinder but not so far that the leading wheels foul inside the front bufferbeam, take a bite for clearance out of the front cylinder head...
 

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QUOTE (34C @ 16 Jul 2008, 15:57) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>My 'creative' solution to Thompson's clunker designs (pacifics, L1's) is virtual modelling: they have always 'failed' somewhere off scene, so that the train they should have worked gets a better looking substitute. There were only 16 of these pacifics anyway, a drop in the ocean of near 400 much better looking wide firebox Gresley and Peppercorn designs.

Concerning a RTR Thompson pacific, there is a problem which requires significant compromise in a model which has to run on set track curves, which relates directly to their inelegant front end. The leading bogie is positioned so far forward that the leading edge of the front bogie wheel is not far behind the buffer beam, and seen in side elevation is behind the front footsteps. The rear wheel of the bogie in side elevation is barely clear of the cylinder front. No problem for the prototype, because the sharpest curve it was expected to negotiate was 6 chains, which scales to 5 feet / 1.6 metre radius in 4mm/ft. However, the RTR model needs to get round 18"/450mm radius, and to achieve that something has got to give. Endless possibilities: undersize bogie wheels, reduced bogie wheelbase, narrower front steps, underlength cylinder block, stretch the front end of the loco body to generate enough space between steps and cylinder front, leave off the front footsteps or fix them to the bogie frame, cam the bogie pivot so that it moves forward just enough to clear the front face of the cylinder but not so far that the leading wheels foul inside the front bufferbeam, take a bite for clearance out of the front cylinder head...

Perhaps Bachmann will take the leaf out of Hornby's book by providing an alternative spare bogie which would be designed for 18" radii......I wonder
 

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I'm guessing we will be hearing something in the next few months, I really can't wait :)
Am I right that althought the main difference between an A1 and A2 was the wheel size, but isn't the boiler diameter smaller to?

As for talk of the Thompson Pacifics, I agree with earlier posters, not that nice to look at, but you should have one on the layout :)
and with the cylinders further back, they do look unusual
 

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yes very true, think I saw her on the NYMR when I was much smaller about 8 or 9.

Does anyone know when she is likely to steam again?
 

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Tom, A1s and A2s shared diagram 118 boilers and they were inter-changed. It is quite possible that Blue Peter's is an A1 boiler because it has the original regulator passage blanked off.

60134
 

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QUOTE It is quite possible that Blue Peter's is an A1 boiler

In which case if they ever need a new one, there's a group of people who can advise where to go shopping


David
 

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QUOTE (60134 @ 18 Jan 2009, 15:41) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Tom, A1s and A2s shared diagram 118 boilers and they were inter-changed. It is quite possible that Blue Peter's is an A1 boiler because it has the original regulator passage blanked off.

60134

Ah ok, so does that mean an A2 and A1 from the front look identical?
 

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If you had a head on only view the only general aspects that would help you differentiate would be the stovepipe chimney on the A1s in the first half of their career, as opposed to lipped chimneys on the A2s; and the (BR)LNER number (60)1XX or (60)5XX. Once the A1s got lipped chimneys circa 55-57, then it's just the numbers. (As usual there were detail differences which were unique to particular engines from various dates, such as fittings on the centre valvechest cover and changes to the smokebox door handrail and lamp iron position.)

All things fairly easy to see close to at rest, but quite a different story in less than ideal conditions of visiblity with a loco working hard and heading toward you at a rate of knots.
 
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