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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,



I was wondering if someone knowledgable about paint work can help me. I am still very new to this Hobby so please forgive me if I get any of the terminology wrong!

Unbeknown to me at the time, I somehow managed to get two small and very faint glue finger prints on my loco, one just below the builders plate on the cab, and another small one on the boiler.

They were faint enough that I could have left them there and it would'nt have been a big issue, but im a perfectionist and so this weekend I attempted to remove them first with plain water on a cotton wool bud, and then with a pencil eraser.

The pencil eraser actually removed the worst of the marks, and although a tiny hint of the glue fingerprint is still there, I felt like the it was more or less job done at that stage.

That was untill i shone a strong light on the subject, and I can see that I must have removed some of the varnsh (lacquer??) with all the rubbing, because those two problem areas are now shiny in strong light compared to the rest of the loco.

Now Ideally I would really like to get these areas back to how they were, which is matte I guess (or would it have been satin?), and blended back in with the rest of the loco.

Can anyone please tell me if this is A. feasable B. something I can do at home. or C. Is there someone in the UK with the required skills that would do minor cosmetic repairs as a service?

Is there be a suitable lacquer / varnish I could spot-apply to the areas in question to remove the shine? or perhaps someone might have an idea for another "hack" ?


One thing I must note is that the lineing is ever so delicate on these locos, so masking areas off could be problematic. I dont have an airbrush currently, which could limit my options.


Any help or advice much appreciated.



Matthew
 

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Matthew, welcome to this forum.

What you describe is probably the result of lightly buffing the typical satin paint finish that Bachmann provide. I'll leave it to others to suggest a suitable rectification. (My recourse is to apply 'filth' on my models, since any loco in service carried some 'deposit', and that's how I disguise any paintwork affected by such as a number change or removal of some applied detail paintwork, or modifications to the model.)

...One thing I must note is that the lining is ever so delicate on these locos, so masking areas off could be problematic...
On Bachmann's products, all the 'tampo printed' detail paintwork: lining, numbers, lettering, totems, works plates and the like; is readily removed by application of white spirit and similar solvents. Great for alterations that many modellers like to make, but it does demand care when using enamel paints. Guess how I discovered this, there I was applying streaks of filth to the side of a tender using a dilute mix of matt 'filth' colour in matt varnish, and the small letters reading 'BRITISH RAILWAYS' in the totem started to shift...
 

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Outside of 34C's suggestion of weathering-down the model to help blend-in the buffed area, my approach would be to give the model an overall coat of a suitable satin varnish to bring everything back to the same surface finish.

This could be done using an acrylic rattle can varnish from the likes of Humbrol/Vallejo/Tamiya, although I would definitely suggest testing on a scrap beforehand...!

Regards,

Cameron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
the side of a tender using a dilute mix of matt 'filth' colour in matt varnish, and the small letters reading
Hi 34C, thankyou so much for the warm welcome - very much appreciated.

Ahhh so it is a satin finish then? thats very helpful to know. I also wondered how Bachmann apply their details, so its Tampo's then? thats another piece of info ive been after for a while now.

Can I ask what you use to apply your "filth" please? I will be sure to stay clear of any of those detail areas!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Outside of 34C's suggestion of weathering-down the model to help blend-in the buffed area, my approach would be to give the model an overall coat of a suitable satin varnish to bring everything back to the same surface finish.

This could be done using an acrylic rattle can varnish from the likes of Humbrol/Vallejo/Tamiya, although I would definitely suggest testing on a scrap beforehand...!

Regards,

Cameron.
Hi Cameron, thanks for your suggestion. Im interested in the rattle can approach... would you be able to recommend a suitable Tamiya or Vallejo satin varnish?

Ive heard good things about "AK Interactive" varnish products on youtube, given how small the areas in question are, perhaps I could get away with dabbing some of this on?


When you say testing on a scrap, what do you mean exactly? I have a little baggy with two painted doors that came with the loco, im never likely to use them so perhaps they would make a good test subject?

thanks
 

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...Can I ask what you use to apply your "filth" please? ...
Because I wanted it streaky on the flat tender sides from water washing down - replicating an appearance I had seen on a loco - I used a soft brush to apply the dirt, after having sprayed the model with a light overall dusting and allowed that to dry. It's very much a 'horses for courses' thing: paint applied by spraying and/or brushing, and using dry powders.

And as Cameron suggests, practising on a whole scrap body strongly recommended to get the feel of what works for you.
 

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Hi Cameron, thanks for your suggestion. Im interested in the rattle can approach... would you be able to recommend a suitable Tamiya or Vallejo satin varnish?

Ive heard good things about "AK Interactive" varnish products on youtube, given how small the areas in question are, perhaps I could get away with dabbing some of this on?


When you say testing on a scrap, what do you mean exactly? I have a little baggy with two painted doors that came with the loco, im never likely to use them so perhaps they would make a good test subject?

thanks
I've not personally had experience with the AK products, although like you have heard good things about them.

As you don't own an airbrush, I would suggest a 'rattle can' for this kind of job - the advantage over brush painting is that it is easier to get a uniform finish over the whole model (if of course that is the desire). That isn't to say that you couldn't get a good finish using a brush of course though!

You could consider just masking-off and spraying the cab side, although I'd definitely recommend a few test pieces before doing that. Tamyia masking tape is faaaar better for this than the B&Q special from the local DIY shop!

<SNIP>
And as Cameron suggests, practising on a whole scrap body strongly recommended to get the feel of what works for you.
^That ;) ^

Doing a larger scrap wagon/coach/loco body as a practice piece over the small extra painted doors that come in the box, is that it is easier to pick up the technique for spraying the larger full-body. Rattle cans aren't really suited to small delicate work - that is where an airbrush comes into its own!

Regards,

Cameron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Because I wanted it streaky on the flat tender sides from water washing down - replicating an appearance I had seen on a loco - I used a soft brush to apply the dirt, after having sprayed the model with a light overall dusting and allowed that to dry. It's very much a 'horses for courses' thing: paint applied by spraying and/or brushing, and using dry powders.

And as Cameron suggests, practising on a whole scrap body strongly recommended to get the feel of what works for you.
Thanks for the info on your approach, very interesting indeed!

I think in this instance I want to go for a "straight up" replacment of satin varnish, im told its the "roughness" in the paint that stops relfection is that correct?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've not personally had experience with the AK products, although like you have heard good things about them.

As you don't own an airbrush, I would suggest a 'rattle can' for this kind of job - the advantage over brush painting is that it is easier to get a uniform finish over the whole model (if of course that is the desire). That isn't to say that you couldn't get a good finish using a brush of course though!

You could consider just masking-off and spraying the cab side, although I'd definitely recommend a few test pieces before doing that. Tamyia masking tape is faaaar better for this than the B&Q special from the local DIY shop!


^That ;) ^

Doing a larger scrap wagon/coach/loco body as a practice piece over the small extra painted doors that come in the box, is that it is easier to pick up the technique for spraying the larger full-body. Rattle cans aren't really suited to small delicate work - that is where an airbrush comes into its own!

Regards,

Cameron.
Hi Cameron,

Can I ask what would be a suitable Tamiya spray product for this job? They have so many products I get a bit confused when looking at the range of clear coats!

Also I was thinking about grabbing one of those cheap £30 cordless airbrushes from ebay just to do the job, obviously that'd add more expense but if it'd likely offer more control than a can then id buy one.

I would rather just do the right side of cab area and not the entire loco. Would it be safe to spray over the builder plate and lining tampos? I have concerns about ruining those areas with masking tape.

Lastly I like the idea of the scrap loco body, but I would have to purchase one from ebay since I only own two locos to my name! I assume it would have to have a similair satin finish to be a good test subject?
 

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Hi,
I have one of those cordless Airbrushes. The Brush, it' self is quite good and is dual action, which is, certainly, an advantage. That said, the air power is at a constant pressure and is not variable. All is not lost there..... but... ['ain't there always one of those] you will have to do a great deal of practice to get the spray density adjustment right, an awful lot, especially with what you are aiming at.

With that caution in mind, a small bottle of Vallejo* AIR!! Satin acrylic varnish and another colour in gloss to put on first, is really quite cheap, as is printing paper. Time is even less costly and many skills can be learned. Reading their [Vallejo] airbrush guide, is also free to download, online - and has some very good guidelines, so long as you go for them one step at a time.

Whatever you decide, may you enjoy the journey.

Julian
* - I wasn't pinning that as an advert for Vallejo, as there are a few equally good alternatives - simply, one I have used, so know it is good. The other top makes have equally good recommendations.
 

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Can I ask what would be a suitable Tamiya spray product for this job? They have so many products I get a bit confused when looking at the range of clear coats!
<SNIP>
I haven't personally used the Tamiya rattle cans, however the TS-79 Semi Gloss Clear appears to be the closest to what you're probably aiming at.

<SNIP>
Also I was thinking about grabbing one of those cheap £30 cordless airbrushes from ebay just to do the job, obviously that'd add more expense but if it'd likely offer more control than a can then id buy one.
<SNIP>
I suppose the age-old question of rattle can vs airbrush is 'how much are you going to use it' which then feeds into 'how much should I invest in getting a good one'. My first airbrush was a cheap ~£40 kit with a 12V compressor. Having quickly upgraded to a £100+ compressor I can definitely say that is infinitely better, however I could 'justify' that as I knew it would be used a lot.

Getting a good finish out of an airbrush, whilst not 'difficult', does take practice, and isn't something you want to be applying straight to a nice locomotive!


<SNIP>
I would rather just do the right side of cab area and not the entire loco. Would it be safe to spray over the builder plate and lining tampos? I have concerns about ruining those areas with masking tape.
<SNIP>
Factory-applied tampo printing is fairly tough against masking tape, although as above ensure that you use 'proper' low-tack modelling masking tape, as the DIY type is faaar too strong for our purposes. Likewise you should generally avoid leaving masking on longer than you need to, as even high-quality adhesives start to 'grab' more over time.

When applying your choice of clear coat, the main message is 'apply thin, apply 2', rather than flooding on a single coat, it is better to come-back with a second one.

IMHO worst-case if you're unhappy with how well the varnish matches the factory finish, you can always over-coat the whole body, or weather it down!

<SNIP>
Lastly I like the idea of the scrap loco body, but I would have to purchase one from ebay since I only own two locos to my name! I assume it would have to have a similair satin finish to be a good test subject?
More the point with a scrap model is that it gets you practiced on how the paint comes out of the can and applies to the model. At a pinch you could use household items such as a yoghurt pot - I have done this whilst practicing with an airbrush! The 'test piece' doesn't need to have the same finish as the model, you are effectively wanting to make it the same finish!

Regards,

Cameron.
 

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C55
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Wise words from Cameron, indeed. What I really like is the idea that the practice is a, variety of enjoyable elements / discoveries in it' self and the results can be compared with the aim and adjusted until you are satisfied. Practice brings more confidence He also pointed out about 2+ coats are better than a flood, which I forgot to mention :(

It will also bring experience of other results, which can be useful in other projects, too.
 
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