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Given the prices being paid on eBay for Bachmann items there may be some misconceptions.

Since 1990 which of Bachmann or Hornby have produced products with greater collectability?

Looking ahead for those keeping products under the bed for 40 years is it considered better to stock up with Hornby or Bachmann goodies?

You have to remember that in 40 years time there is a good chance that the existing Hornby and Bachmann management will have changed and the new management then will have different ideas. Graham Hubbard and Simon Kohler will be seen as the equivalent of Richard Lines by historians. The products of today in the future will be today's equivalent of the EM2, steeple cab diesel, Transcontinental loco and Triang Princess.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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I don't understand this idea of collecting something in the hope that it will be much more valuable in many years time. I buy things because I like them as they are now. For instance, I won't touch old Hornby Dublo stuff and can't understand why people pay inflated prices for something inferior to what is available now. And why people buy the old tinplate is beyond my understanding. It would serve them right if it went out of fashion and lost value.

Twenty years ago or more, I paid £30 for a painting that was in an exhibition at our local library. This was because I really liked it, and still do, not in the hope that the young artist would one day become famous and it be worth thousands (although I wouldn't mind if that happened).

Buy to enjoy now!
 

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From what I see those who buy the tin plate and Dublo stuff do in the main buy it to run. Its one aspect of the hobby and we don't have to try understand the motives behind it. From the point of view of the Dublo and tin plate operators it is probably felt that todays offerings are too good to run and not very practical for a hands experience! Thats the impression given when I chat anyway.

I too cannot understand those who buy something and keep it in the box forever! However this is yet another aspect of the hobby and who are we to condemn those who help to support the manufacturers through their purchases even if they do remain forever in the box.

However this is not the question and this topic seeks opinions on todays products not yesterdays. We all buy for today and most of us run the products we buy however when they eventually get packed away which the majority of us will do which are going to offer a better tomorrow?

Hornby or Bachmann?

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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Probably Bachmann as they seem to be doing more limited editions with certificates than Hornby.

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Don't Bachmann tend to have smaller batch sizes than Hornby? Might make them more collectable. Suppose it depends on individual model. For instance their seems to be quite a lot of interest in Bachmann FSR Turbostar, which is now sold out in shops.

Russell
 

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I think particularly the Bachmann Club limited editions are a good buy as collectables more so than the Hornby ones. Bachmann have tended to issue some unusual models which catch the eye.
 

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Will models (irrespective of Hornby or Bachmann) purchased for the underlying reason they will be worth real money in 40 years time ?

Not really if people hoard them en masse.

There will be far too many on the market. Yes, Ltd editions will fetch money but not in the way 40 Y.O. + models are today.

40 years ago most of us played with our models (& in my case anyway) often to the point of destruction thereby increasing the value of the ones that were looked after.

If we had all kept our Dinky & Matchbox vehicles prestine what price would they fetch now ?

As to the original question Bachmann, unless one of them should go under in which case it will be the models from the defunct company.
 

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QUOTE (Robert Stokes @ 12 Dec 2007, 15:06) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I don't understand this idea of collecting something in the hope that it will be much more valuable in many years time. I buy things because I like them as they are now. For instance, I won't touch old Hornby Dublo stuff and can't understand why people pay inflated prices for something inferior to what is available now. And why people buy the old tinplate is beyond my understanding. It would serve them right if it went out of fashion and lost value.

Buy to enjoy now!

Good, glad I'm not the only one that thinks that way.
Even when I still had my shop, 2 years ago, there were customers who would only buy Hornby, and not consider Bachmann, why, just because of the name. Even new comers to the hobby would first mention Hornby - the name goes before it. These people took alot of convincing that Bachmann was/is just as good - some times even better. But I'm just a modeller, not a collector, good locos are for running, not stuffing in a display case.
Paul M.
 

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Interesting debate, I come from a family of collectors (I think it's in the blood now) but most of what they collected were static, i.e. stamps, model vechicles etc, these were meant to be a display case not running round a layout, and occasionally coming to grief or just plain wearing out.
We have the best of both worlds with very detailed models now made by both Hornby and Bachmann that look good in a display case but in my opinion look better pulling a rake of coaches on a layout.
I guess if you want something to put in a display case there are coal or porcelin models which look like they've used the same moulds as Hornby.
On the Hornby / Bachmann issue I to think it will be Bachmann due to there being less made and therefore less "preserved" than Hornby.
Does anyone know how Mainline or Airfix GMR models fair on the collectors market, not that I have any but they are two companies no longer around, although the models still are being made by Hornby or Bachmann for the most part.

Happy Modelling

Mike
 

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While we may be debating the collectability of Bachmann and Hornby it seems that there is ahrdcore who firmly believe in their collectability. The Bachmann Collector club announced in their last mag that they would do a BR Maroon Ivatt, in the last couple of weeks while I have been procrastinating over whether to get this or not they have sold out. Obviously some people deem these items collec.table.
 

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Slightly off topic but collectable if they stop working, then stuff 'em in a glass display case.

I have a friend who purchased for an investment one of the Bachmann limited editions with coaches in a nice wooden box. Looked nice then he went & took all of them out with grubby hands & ran them around for a while & when he put them bck in the box, managed to bend a coupling. When I mentioned that the investment has been degraded as it is now no longer new & slightly damaged, he spat the dummy especially when I offered to but them from him for normal price, not the Special Edition price. He & his wife, were under the impression that the value would stay even if it had been used & slightly damaged.
 

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I often ponder on the reasons why some people buy a model and then leave it in a box or on display where it won't collect dust or fade because the value may be diminished.

I have a few friends who collect model trains from a certain period - not as an investment but for the sheer joy of looking at the models on display -this I can understand.
But to buy a model that was purposely made to move along a track as an "investment" and to leave it in its box for "X" years with the view that its value will increase - this I struggle with. ( Not that I have any objection - as it adds another group of buyers that make the production of models more viable for the RTR manufacturers.)

In answer to Gary's original question I would ask "Which of the two companies is going to bring out the more interesting models? ' as I suggest that its the model that makes it a collectible not the manufacturer - merely having a "limited edition" does not make it a certain to become a good investment - take the prices now paid for the original Blue Pullmans as an example - who would have predicted that 30 odd years ago? On the other hand the more recent Heljan class 47 "Windsor Castle" limited edition is currently available at well under the original asking price.

Me - I sometimes buy "collectibles" or "limited editions to run on my layout because its the model I have been looking for - its my hobby

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
QUOTE Does anyone know how Mainline or Airfix GMR models fair on the collectors market

Hornby in similar condition from the same period fares 25-30% better. The issue is Mainline and Airfix models are perceived as fragile and are often damaged or don't run that well due to chassis design so collectors are a little wary. Hornby may have their knockers for chassis design however the models from the period are very reliable and are more robust probably becuase models were produced with kids in mind although many are actually pretty good even so.

My view is the Hornby brand will carry a 25-30% premium in 40 years time as it does now. One reason will be that spares will be in reasonable supply whatever as the market will be big enough to sustain a spares business. Spares for Mainline and Airfix are non existant. I have a feeling spares for current Bachmann will be non existant in 40 years time in the way they are now for Mainline and Airfix.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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oops - finger trouble.

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QUOTE (Gary @ 14 Dec 2007, 09:09) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I have a feeling spares for current Bachmann will be non existant in 40 years time in the way they are now for Mainline and Airfix.

Surely if the model is kept undisturbed for 40 + years as an investment is spares availability going to be an issue?

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I would guess that more models are put away now than was the case 40 years ago. If spares are not available in 40 years time I would also guess that those models that have remained undisturbed would be the ones most sought after given that the collector market is as strong then as it is now.

Given the current state of play I have a suspicion that in 40 years time Hornby spares will be plentiful and Bachmann not and as such this could strengthen the case for Bachmann being the more collectable.

On the other hand Hornby has the history (100 years old in whenever it is. Yes I am aware of the Hornby Hornby and Triang Hornby thing however expect Margate fireworks) and may well be the more sought after in 40 years time.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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QUOTE (gdaysydney @ 13 Dec 2007, 23:59) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I often ponder on the reasons why some people buy a model and then leave it in a box or on display where it won't collect dust or fade because the value may be diminished.

I have a few friends who collect model trains from a certain period - not as an investment but for the sheer joy of looking at the models on display -this I can understand.
But to buy a model that was purposely made to move along a track as an "investment" and to leave it in its box for "X" years with the view that its value will increase - this I struggle with. ( Not that I have any objection - as it adds another group of buyers that make the production of models more viable for the RTR manufacturers.)

In answer to Gary's original question I would ask "Which of the two companies is going to bring out the more interesting models? ' as I suggest that its the model that makes it a collectible not the manufacturer - merely having a "limited edition" does not make it a certain to become a good investment - take the prices now paid for the original Blue Pullmans as an example - who would have predicted that 30 odd years ago? On the other hand the more recent Heljan class 47 "Windsor Castle" limited edition is currently available at well under the original asking price.

Me - I sometimes buy "collectibles" or "limited editions to run on my layout because its the model I have been looking for - its my hobby
Dave


To be honest, I sometimes have trouble equating the 'buy it as an investment and keep it in it's box because the value will increase' approach with being a collector- I'm a modeller (not just of railways...) AND a collector (diecast cars- also a modeller as I sometimes modify and repaint, as well as building kits), and I collect because I'm interested in the models and the actual vehicles they're based on. Yes, much of my collection is still packed away in its' boxes, simply because I don't have cabinet space to display the lot, and I know that some of them have increased in value, but for me that's not the reason I collect.

I suspect some of those of who buy limited editions and either hide them away in the hope the value will increase, or stick them on EBay in the hope of making a quick profit would be as happy doing the same with model buses, doll's houses or anything else they think might be worth a few quid in 20 years time....
 
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