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Chief mouser
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It certainly looks a stunning model, and that detailing is excellent. I have to agree with Brian about the stripe though - I really think it could be crisper.

Sad that I am I have just calculated that Everest would be about 335 feet high in 1/87!

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QUOTE (Brian Considine @ 1 Oct 2008, 10:56) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Believe me he can be sadder !

Alas very true, but hopefully it gave you a chuckle.

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QUOTE (neil_s_wood @ 1 Oct 2008, 22:15) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>It also gives you a sense of perspective. It's that big.


And the scale model would, I believe, be taller than any natural feature in the Netherlands.

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sorry i havent replied to this thread.

yes the yellow stripe is a bit iffy. thgis is only made worse by the very glossy finish of the loco. i really dont think a gloss finish is suitable for a model. it never really looks good.

the chap seen in that other picture is i believe a bachmann employee and is seen in allot of the bachmann china literature.
when i first saw some of the pictures on the net i just thought he was some crazy guy that had more than a healthy interest in his models (come on we have all met them havent we??!!)

a 335 ft high mountain n HO. hmm i would struggle to find space for a 3 ft mountain but we can all dream....

Peter
 

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QUOTE (pedromorgan @ 3 Oct 2008, 06:35) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>i really dont think a gloss finish is suitable for a model. it never really looks good.

I have to agree on that point Peter, and, as I recall, we have discussed this in the past In my opinion a satin finish will always look better on a model - it's something to do with the refraction of light.

As to the mountain - I think most of us would struggle with a 3 foot mountain.

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The finish may be dodgy as discussed but the detail looks to be exceptionally good. I hope it's a sign of things to come for British outline models - not that their recent output has been poor, far from it, but this shows that in some areas at least they can do better.
 

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QUOTE (Doug @ 26 Sep 2008, 01:22) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Peter tells us what he thinks of the Bachmann China Tibet stock.

Click here for the review.
Thinking about buying one of these sets as part of collection of interesting/iconic trains around the world. Good review and great information. The new sets appear to come with 3 locos ( white or green) and 2 sleeper carriages. Does anyone know if and or where additional special RW25Z cars can be obtained.

Any info appreciated. John
 

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they can be obtained but i think evrywhere i know of is out of stock at the moment. i am sure there will be more batches as time passes.

its still sitting on my layout here. i havent got around to taking a look at the bogies. the loco wont even go up and down my test track without throwing itself of in one place or another.

Peter
 

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Peter,

I hadn't noticed this thread before, nor seen any other reviews of Bachmann's 'Tibet' production, so this was interesting to read.

Regarding the running problem you write: "but it seems that the centre axle of each bogie is positioned slightly lower than the outer 2 meaning that it rocks back and forth and the 6 wheels don't seem to sit on the rail at the same time."

Looking at the pictures of the chassis in your review, the general construction looks to be in the same style as the Bachmann UK product, so it is probable that this problem which has been noted on some UK 3 axle bogie models arises from the same cause. First thing, check with your steel straightedge that your perception that the centre axles sit low compared to the outer axles is correct. If it is, then (working on the assumption that the construction is similar to that of the UK models,) remove the outer cosmetic frame of the bogie, to access the wheelsets; the brass bearing collars of which are clipped into the plastic housing at the bottom of the bogie gear tower. Try opening the diameter of the location for the brass collar of the centre axle for an easy fit; that was all that was necessary on the model I tinkered with for this problem. A minutes work with a small rat tail file, check that the wheels sit on a common plane, and you are done.

My suspicion is that is the quite tight 'clip in' action of the brass bearing collar of the centre wheelset which causes the problem. If you think about the mechanics of it you will see why: the housing is made in a fairly elastic polymer, and when the centre brass collar is clipped in the housing deforms in response, causing the ends to curve upwards.
 

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QUOTE (BRITHO @ 2 Oct 2008, 15:22) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>And the scale model would, I believe, be taller than any natural feature in the Netherlands.

Regards

Nah ... there's a Dutch hill which is 1000ft+ ... but an HO 'Everest' would be about the same height as St Paul's Cathedral. Even Ben Nevis is 50ft high in HO. The prototype Universe is a big place. An HO/OO scale Planet Earth would actually be a respectable asteroid, bigger than the one which killed the dinosaurs (allegedly)
 
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