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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,

I read a lot on this forum about the importance of checking and, where necessary, adjusting the back-to-back wheel measurement but I can't find any detailed descriptions of how to actually do this.

I've bought an N Gauge back to back gauge and it would appear that some of my locos & rolling stock would benefit from adjustment. I would appreciate some advice on how to do this and what special tools are required.

Regards,

Expat.
 

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You can usually adjust the back-to-back distance on rolling stock and some deisel/electric locos by pulling or pushing them gently. I haven't tried with steam outline engines yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
QUOTE (poliss @ 27 Aug 2008, 20:35) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>You can usually adjust the back-to-back distance on rolling stock and some deisel/electric locos by pulling or pushing them gently. I haven't tried with steam outline engines yet.

Thanks for your response at least poliss.

I was rather hoping, however, that someone would come back with something a bit more precise that 'pull or push' them, particularly in relation to steam locos.

Thanks again,

Expat.
 

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QUOTE (Expat @ 30 Aug 2008, 02:14) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Thanks for your response at least poliss.

I was rather hoping, however, that someone would come back with something a bit more precise that 'pull or push' them, particularly in relation to steam locos.

Thanks again,

Expat.

 

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QUOTE (Expat @ 30 Aug 2008, 02:14) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Thanks for your response at least poliss.

I was rather hoping, however, that someone would come back with something a bit more precise that 'pull or push' them, particularly in relation to steam locos.

Thanks again,

Expat.

***Hi Trevor

Yep, the data so far isn't helpful is it... couching a precise adjustment in terms such as grab and twist isn't confidence building :) :)

For rolling stock, a gentle twist and pull or twist and push will do for adjusting it as they have nylon bushes betwixt axle and wheel, however care is needed as its easy to damage the coning of the bearing in the plastic of the wagon etc - so removal first is really best practice .

I make very precise gauges in several different BTB's for HO and 4mm scale including 3 for "16.5mm gauge" fine-ness variants + EM and P4, and can create one for N if there is enough interest - AND if N scale modellers want to tell me what they want.... these are created in polished hard brass to within 2 thousandths of an inch on a bad day, so guesswork aint an option :)

Steam loco's take a far more precise approach as they are bedecked with valve gear which will need removing at least in part, the firmness of their connection to the axle is critical and so is their quartering, so there is no room for approximation in that area.

Basically with steam locos it needs a lot of care, especially with loco's like GF/bach's N scale which is pretty fragile at best in the area of valve gear. It also needs a tool to help the inexperienced modeller and make it a less stressful one for those with more hands on expeirence too.

So...

I am close to finalising a very precise and safe wheel puller for 4mm scale and HO scale RTR and any kit built loco with a friction fitted axle such as Gibson etc but I admit I hadn't considered N gauge in its creation.

But... I could.... If accurate data is made available as to whats needed by N scale modellers.

If you would like to measure the axle diameters of your N scale steam locos and diseasel locos (accurately please) and also tell me the largest and smallest diameter for steam and diesel wheels on your locos (to the nearest 1/2mm is OK there) ....I MAY be able to accommodate N too..... but no promises, and it may be as a "surcharge" on what will be the HO / OO and scale versions price.... which is not yet finalised, other than to say it'll not be a low cost tool!

Richard
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
At last.

Thank you very much Richard for taking the time to give an in-depth response.

I have some electronic calipers so will put them on the axles and let you know the range of diameters via a PM.

Cheers,

Trevor
 

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QUOTE (Brian Considine @ 30 Aug 2008, 16:37) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi Martin - is that a pickup for coach lighting I see ?

If so can you post some further details of it please ?

***Hi Brian

Its the form of pickup I've been promoting as its so easy for modellers to do - Martin uses it often as its very effective..

basically a spring is formed around the axle diameter from fine Phosphor bronze or similar wire, and the wire to the lights is simply soldered to its tail. Martin is using silod kynar type wire on that one, so the spring of bare wire + wire to the lighting are one bit (kynar is silver plated so makes great pickups).

You can do similar by cutting off s short length of SS or brass tube that fits the axle snugly, and soldering a wire to it, but the spring is so easy its not really worth the trouble.

I'm tossing up getting the springs premade and selling in packs of say 50 - it'd be cheap enough... but am not sure the huge # wanted from the spring Mfr is viable - its a LOT!

Richard
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 30 Aug 2008, 17:03) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm tossing up getting the springs premade and selling in packs of say 50 - it'd be cheap enough... but am not sure the huge # wanted from the spring Mfr is viable - its a LOT!

Richard

Put me down for 2 packs of 50 please.

Trevor.
 

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QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 30 Aug 2008, 12:47) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>/snip

So...

I am close to finalising a very precise and safe wheel puller for 4mm scale and HO scale RTR and any kit built loco with a friction fitted axle such as Gibson etc but I admit I hadn't considered N gauge in its creation.

/snip
Richard

Hi Richard,

I apologise for dragging up an old post, but I wondered if you had produced a wheel puller?

I have been through your website but although I found your B2B tool which looks very nicely made I couldn't see a wheel puller...

Regards

Westy
 

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although twisting/pulling/pushing is hte most common method advocated to adjust wheel b-to-b 's....what seems to be ignored, or taken for granted in descriptions is.....on a given axle, both wheels need to be adjusted by equal amounts.

to ensure the wheels are still evenly spaced upon the axle.

It is this part of the process I found hard to get used to...often one wheel would move more easily than the other...especially those where, on an axle, only one wheel was 'insulated'...

Fixed, moulded wheel/axle sets are impossibe to adjust without cutting the axle and perhaps bushing with tube, etc..

What I'd like to see is an adjustable B-to-B gauge.....which could be slipped inside an existing wheelset, and ''opened up'' pushing each wheel outwards by an equal amount.

Perhaps such an item would also need to 'register' against the axle ends?

or am I being too picky with my adjustments? [mind, I have problems quartering by eye too...preferring some method more 'positive' in application.]
 

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Returning to the N Gauge back to back - I have found that the tolerances used for N gauge track means that this does not have to be precice. You also need to take account of thge flange thickness.
As a recent example, I was upgrading the pony truck wheels on my GWR 460 fleet, and having measured the back to back and setting it at the correct distance had to adjust as they did not like a couple of my points so it is really a matter of trial and error.
 

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back-to-back settings for wheelesets are, as elmo discovered, really a big compromise.

really what needs to be set is the check gauge...but this is somewhat less convenient to do.
[check gauge is, simply [I think] the measurement from the rear of one wheel, to the outer flange face [not too sure here, does the wheel root get taken into account?] of the opposite wheel.]
 
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