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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello

Just jotting down notes on a new track layout and seemed to have ended up with a plan 9'6" by 5'6".
Should I try my hand at a grid type construction with squares around 18" made out of 3" by 1" or go
for the L girder type with two centre main girders and strips across the top.
I would support either on trestles.
My problem is although the layout would sort of be permanent I can almost guess in a couple of years
I would have to move it, even if only into the garden so the room could be decorated. Any particular
system less likely to twist or bend when lifted by friends !

Thanks
 

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QUOTE (Smokeyone @ 27 Sep 2008, 17:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hello

Just jotting down notes on a new track layout and seemed to have ended up with a plan 9'6" by 5'6".
Should I try my hand at a grid type construction with squares around 18" made out of 3" by 1" or go
for the L girder type with two centre main girders and strips across the top.
I would support either on trestles.
My problem is although the layout would sort of be permanent I can almost guess in a couple of years
I would have to move it, even if only into the garden so the room could be decorated. Any particular
system less likely to twist or bend when lifted by friends !

Thanks

Hi
A local model shop has a workshop where he constructs layouts, each one made up of modular boards 4ft square one of his layout in last week was over 15 ft long.
Made up in modules they will be more rigid if you come to moving them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
QUOTE (upnick @ 27 Sep 2008, 19:38) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi
A local model shop has a workshop where he constructs layouts, each one made up of modular boards 4ft square one of his layout in last week was over 15 ft long.
Made up in modules they will be more rigid if you come to moving them.

Perhaps it is a bit large to move as one piece, but I was only thinking (just in case) with the help of friends and then only a matter of yards. Maybe it would be better to make it as two modules !!
It should be permanent but I do believe in "sods law strikes again"
 

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QUOTE (Smokeyone @ 27 Sep 2008, 18:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hello

Just jotting down notes on a new track layout and seemed to have ended up with a plan 9'6" by 5'6".
Should I try my hand at a grid type construction with squares around 18" made out of 3" by 1" or go
for the L girder type with two centre main girders and strips across the top.
I would support either on trestles.
My problem is although the layout would sort of be permanent I can almost guess in a couple of years
I would have to move it, even if only into the garden so the room could be decorated. Any particular
system less likely to twist or bend when lifted by friends !

Thanks
Hi
You will never move a solid 9'6" x 5'6" layout easily!
Consider open topped construction and make bolt together modules on 4' x 2' max size per module. As 4' x 2' is about the maximum size one person can easily manoeuvre!
With open top construction you can have the tracks raised above the base framing or level with its top.
 

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QUOTE (Smokeyone @ 28 Sep 2008, 01:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hello

Just jotting down notes on a new track layout and seemed to have ended up with a plan 9'6" by 5'6".
Should I try my hand at a grid type construction with squares around 18" made out of 3" by 1" or go
for the L girder type with two centre main girders and strips across the top.
I would support either on trestles.
My problem is although the layout would sort of be permanent I can almost guess in a couple of years
I would have to move it, even if only into the garden so the room could be decorated. Any particular
system less likely to twist or bend when lifted by friends !

Thanks

***If moving is a possibility use a grid type board - however make the grid about 15" square not 18" - that is too far between supports/risers. When each board is made, clamp it to the next in perfect alignment and in two places drill a single 1/8 hole as a pilot for baseboard alignment dowells. Also drill 2 clearance holes for 1/4" or 6mm bolts to be used with wingnuts to hold them together once aligned with the dowells.

Our own very precise and accurate baseboard alignment dowell is available from Bromsgrove models and Euroscale models, both are forum members here and give excellent service.

Richard
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 28 Sep 2008, 06:05) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>***If moving is a possibility use a grid type board - however make the grid about 15" square not 18" - that is too far between supports/risers. When each board is made, clamp it to the next in perfect alignment and in two places drill a single 1/8 hole as a pilot for baseboard alignment dowells. Also drill 2 clearance holes for 1/4" or 6mm bolts to be used with wingnuts to hold them together once aligned with the dowells.

Our own very precise and accurate baseboard alignment dowell is available from Bromsgrove models and Euroscale models, both are forum members here and give excellent service.

Richard

Alignment dowels it is then, thanks again for the advice.
 
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