Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Elsewhere I mentioned the fact that Roco's début steam model, the BR58 raised the bar for every manufacturer when it was introduced. To this day, no other model has had such a profound impact upon the market and although eclipsed by better and more expensive models, Roco's BR58 still remains a perfectly good model but it was its impact upon the market that made it special.

I challenge others to name (or shame) by nominating another model that has had such a profound effect, please may I suggest this is not just a 'list of favourites', some justification is needed behind the choice.

Over to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
The Roco Rh 310 in HO scale.



When it was released, the bar for high volume models was significantly raised. RP25 wheelsets, smoke box doors that open, DCC installed, and incredible detail.

Imho, this model really made an impact when it was released - more Roco Platinum models followed, and other manufacturers adapted to the 310s standards as well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
710 Posts
I would like to put forward Liliput Wien.

1.The introduction of DB scale length 1/87 coaches in the late 1960s.
2.Model of the 05 class of locomotives in the early 1970s, which set the standard for all the model manufactures.
Finer wheel profiles and what would have been classed as superdetailing at the time

Then followed by the Br 45 a couple of years later


Then let down by that bloody awful motor they used


David
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
QUOTE (ME 26-06 @ 28 Dec 2007, 06:14) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The Roco Rh 310 in HO scale.



When it was released, the bar for high volume models was significantly raised. RP25 wheelsets, smoke box doors that open, DCC installed, and incredible detail.

Imho, this model really made an impact when it was released - more Roco Platinum models followed, and other manufacturers adapted to the 310s standards as well.
Wow that looks good. I hope this gets re-released sometime soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
I remember a Japanese made American outline model with lost wax Westinghouse air brakes. The detail was amazing.
Can't remember exactly which model it was after 37 years, but if madkitten looks in the July or August 1970 Railway Modeller she might find it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,202 Posts
Off the top of my head, I'd like to nominate the first U.S. outline HO switchers produced by Kato?

I believe it was an Alco S1?

Whatever the prototype, Kato set the ball rolling regarding accurate, FINE detail, and superb mechanisms, which the rest of the US-market manufacturers were compelled to follow.

Gone were the days of brute force and huge amperages.

Given their prices, I believe Kato spoilt things for the rest of the world as well, by providing superb mechanisms which really 'showed up' the shortcomings in European and UK-outline RTR models?

I also believe Kato spelt out the death knell for those into cheap 'n cheerful loco detailing?

I recall my efforts at detailing Athearns and Bachmann's products, and Model Power..to see the first Kato switchers, and feeling.....''what's the point in my wasting my time?''
 

·
Totally Crazy.......
Joined
·
684 Posts
QUOTE (poliss @ 27 Dec 2007, 21:03) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I remember a Japanese made American outline model with lost wax Westinghouse air brakes. The detail was amazing.
Can't remember exactly which model it was after 37 years, but if madkitten looks in the July or August 1970 Railway Modeller she might find it.

It was in the June edition for 1970 on page 195 and they were made for Victors of the USA in Japan. The picture does indeed show staggering amounts of detail. They were both Southern Pacific Prototypes, a GS2 4-8-4 semi streamlined express and a 2-8-0 freight loco with a vanderbilt tender. They were considered very expensive at the time the UK imported models costing a whole 32.00 - 52.00 quid!!!. Apparantly all the small details where Lost wax cast and the finish is extremely good - i would say matching that of modern day models easily...............

Nikki
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
Drat! I could have sworn it was in the July 1970 issue. Memory isn't what it was. lol
 

·
is asleep
Joined
·
758 Posts
QUOTE (ME 26-06 @ 27 Dec 2007, 19:14) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The Roco Rh 310 in HO scale.



When it was released, the bar for high volume models was significantly raised. RP25 wheelsets, smoke box doors that open, DCC installed, and incredible detail.

Imho, this model really made an impact when it was released - more Roco Platinum models followed, and other manufacturers adapted to the 310s standards as well.
Yes, yes definitely!

I wonder about an N scale model that made a huge impact - perhaps the original Arnold 200 models that created the scale as we know it as today? In fact perhaps the Rapido coupler itself!! Being free for other manufacturers to use and so encouraging standardisation of N scale right from the beginning really launched the scale I think.
 

·
is asleep
Joined
·
758 Posts
QUOTE (72C @ 27 Dec 2007, 17:22) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Elsewhere I mentioned the fact that Roco's début steam model, the BR58 raised the bar for every manufacturer when it was introduced. To this day, no other model has had such a profound impact upon the market and although eclipsed by better and more expensive models, Roco's BR58 still remains a perfectly good model but it was its impact upon the market that made it special.

I challenge others to name (or shame) by nominating another model that has had such a profound effect, please may I suggest this is not just a 'list of favourites', some justification is needed behind the choice.

Over to you.

Oh, I forgot to ask you 72C, what is the motive behind your challenge, why ask the forum, surely you should decide for yourself?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
QUOTE (goedel @ 29 Dec 2007, 01:32) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Oh, I forgot to ask you 72C, what is the motive behind your challenge, why ask the forum, surely you should decide for yourself?

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
710 Posts
QUOTE (adecoaches26point4 @ 27 Dec 2007, 19:59) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I would like to put forward Liliput Wien.

1.The introduction of DB scale length 1/87 coaches in the late 1960s.
2.Model of the 05 class of locomotives in the early 1970s, which set the standard for all the model manufactures.
Finer wheel profiles and what would have been classed as superdetailing at the time

Then followed by the Br 45 a couple of years later


Then let down by that bloody awful motor they used


David

Should of added a green Epoch I Bavarian BR 18? in green with brass topped chimney and cranked axle to rods for the inside cylinders.
Beautifully Engineered by Liliput


David
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
QUOTE (ME 26-06 @ 28 Dec 2007, 06:14) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The Roco Rh 310 in HO scale.



When it was released, the bar for high volume models was significantly raised. RP25 wheelsets, smoke box doors that open, DCC installed, and incredible detail.

Imho, this model really made an impact when it was released - more Roco Platinum models followed, and other manufacturers adapted to the 310s standards as well.
Someone I know has got one of these for sale. If anyones interested please PM me.
 

·
Chief mouser
Joined
·
11,775 Posts
QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 6 Jan 2008, 09:19) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm going to have to pretend I hav'nt seen that !

Probably best - I had terrible visions of the local newspaper headlines


Regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
QUOTE (goedel @ 29 Dec 2007, 00:32) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Oh, I forgot to ask you 72C, what is the motive behind your challenge, why ask the forum, surely you should decide for yourself?

Obviously asking questions is a problem for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,342 Posts
Hi All

The Loco for me that really changed the amount of detail available RTR first sold in 1972
the Fleischmann BR64 the worst aspect of this model is the gap in the buffer beam for the coupler but the rest of the detail is great Lettering fantastic

It won awards at the time



From the 1973 catalog

Regards Zmil
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
*** Sorry Zmil... I know its individual thought that is the focus of this thread ..... but from my perspective, how can you say the worst aspect is the gap in the buffer beam when the wheel flanges are HUGE and scream "Toy" as soon as you look at the picture!

There are very many very fine EU model locomotives, but very very very few that can claim to look good below the running boards!

EU wise, I can't fairly comment on one individual loco but to me the move of Brawa into more refined RTR mainline products took things "detail realism wise" a step beyond almost anything I've seen by Roco, FLM, Matrix, Liliput etc... Brawas refinement in everything from flanges to handrails seems a step above the rest.

I think that the "break point" in RTR for US modellers was Kato + Stewart hobbies F7 - Kato took a commonly modelled prototype that had been made in the millions and added detail and refinement plus a superb mechanism to start a waterfall in other US Brand improvements... This was followed by Lifelikes sudden change from toylike to superdetail with their E8 and the flood of subsequent and always nice Proto series models.... and all the rest fell into line. Athaerns current nice lco's really owe their new found refinement to Stewart & Highliner which they absorbed to take them from reliable toy to realistic models.

Madkitten/Poliss: Those early Brass loco's were never very good - the detail was OK in comparison to concurrent RTR, but in reality no better than a bowser loco with detail kit added... mechanisms and motors were universally poor so good running required hours of fiddling with minor shorts and frequently, remotoring and new gearboxes (thank god for NorthWest Short Line who started their business in order to provide quality parts to fix faulty Japanese/Korean brass loco's!!

The detail and accuracy/proportion of earlier brass was actually very clumsily done in many cases.

I think that for UK Prototype Hornby Dublo's "super detail" series was the quantum leap, taking RTR from tinplate to well proportioned injection moulded plastic models.

For a more current UK perspective: Hornby, they progressed in a stuttering sort of way but real change came to them and Bachmann with the move to China.. Personally I think for Hornby the the Pullman coaches, Black 5 and 8F were the real start of something special loco wise (my LMS preference is showing there) and for Bachmann, BR Mk1's, the Jinty and their LNER A4, which I still prefer to the Hornby offering body and running quality wise.

Regards

Richard
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top