Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·


The two new models that Brawa is launching are beautiful, fast and enduring. The S9 Länderbahn in green and the DRG's BR 14 in black are genuinely beautiful steam locomotives. Brawa's models are just as appealing as the originals, and they incorporate a whole host of precision details such as accurately replicated paintwork and true-to-epoch lighting. The boiler, chassis, gangplank, tender box and spoked wheels are also precision made in die-cast zinc, and the locomotives have doors that open and close.

Locomotives with a 4-4-0 or 2B wheel arrangement (i.e. with a two-axle bogie and two driving axles) dominated the European express train and passenger train scene for around 20 years. The Prussian State Railway alone purchased 3472 locomotives with this wheel arrangement; the last ones as late as 1913.

At the turn of the 20th century, trains started getting heavier and heavier, and many of the 2B locomotives were reaching their performance limits. Another carrying axle had to be added so that the locomotives could be -fitted with more efficient boilers. This gave birth to the 4-4-2 or 2B1 wheel arrangement, which was also called the "Atlantic" type. The Atlantic Coast Line in the USA first used this locomotive type, which is where it got its name from. Locomotive experts know that the Atlantics were the most -elegant and aesthetic steam locomotives ever built. They were also a great deal more powerful and ran a lot more quietly than their predecessors. Atlantic locomotives could travel at speeds of up to 200 km/h.

The KPEV (Königlich Preußische Eisenbahn Verwaltungen) was the first railway company to purchase S7 Atlantics starting in 1902 in two types - the Hanoverian type and the Graffenstaden type, each named after its -supplier. The locomotives ran extremely quietly and they were much more powerful than the 2B predecessors. Soon, however, they weren't able to meet the increasingly demanding requirements and the Hanoverian S7 was upgraded into a kind of "Super Atlantic", creating the S9. Designed and built at Hanomag in Hanover, 99 S9s were delivered from 1908 onwards.

The S9's excellent running properties and its powerful boiler made it perfect for the flat terrain of northern Germany. Its maximum permissible speed was 110 km/h, though the large tender made long-distance journeys of over 250 km possible. It was also visually appealing and is considered to be one of the most beautiful Prussian locomotives of all time. It is strange, however, that these locomotives did not incorporate the efficient superheated steam process which was already in use at the time. This was corrected in 1914 when the process of retrofitting the locomotives with superheated steam capability began. Unfortunately, though, it was interrupted by the outbreak of the first world war and only two locomotives were retrofitted. The retrofitted models did, however, perform better. After the war, 17 locomotives had to be transferred to Belgium and four to French railway companies. The Deutsche Reichsbahn only took over three of the remaining ones. They were allocated to the 14.0 locomotive category in 1925 but taken out of service a short time later. There was no demand in Germany at that time for locomotives that could pull light trains at high speeds. The Belgian State Railway continued to use its S9 very successfully, and the last S9 wasn't taken out of service until after the second world war, which is -further proof of its efficiency and excellent design.

Delivery Date: October 2008

This model is being offered at a cheaper price if ordered before 28/12/07. Is this a new marketing strategy? It does look very good and will be up to Brawa's usual standards. However how many people will order a year in advance? I might be persuaded.


 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,677 Posts
It will make an excellent model. The hopper ashpan (I assume that's what the downward extension between trailing coupled wheel and rear carrying wheel is) must have been a very advanced feature at the time of construction. Strange that superheating was initially omitted; there's a direct parallel with the contemporary UK equivalent, Ivatt's 251 class large atlantic (later LNER C1) of 1902. Although adequate for the work it was built for, these locos were dramatically improved when superheaters were subsequently installed.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,844 Posts
QUOTE Strange that superheating was initially omitted;
Could that have been due to the cost of licensing a patent?

David
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,677 Posts
QUOTE (dwb @ 14 Nov 2007, 17:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Could that have been due to the cost of licensing a patent?
May well have been. I remember reading that the Schmidt superheater came 'bundled,' there was other patent kit that also had to be used as a condition of the licence, applying to valve rings and lubrication. Can understand that being an issue on a class of hundreds of locos, but not so much on a relatively small class of prestige express machines. Some years later, the licence fee for the Kylchap exhaust ejector lead to the LNER only applying it to a relatively few locos, despite the proven benefit. Wide application only occured once patent rights had expired.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,844 Posts
QUOTE Wide application only occured once patent rights had expired.

IIRC, the superheater patent ran out in the late teens.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
QUOTE (dwb @ 14 Nov 2007, 19:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Could that have been due to the cost of licensing a patent?

David

No.

Robert Garbe, responsible at the time, believed that many of the "southern" design elements, such as 4-cyl. compound drive, or superheaters, were humbug. He favoured an efficient, economical (read: cheap) design for "his" Prussian engines.

Garbe´s "evil spirit" carried forward into the time when the first "Einheitslokomotiven" were designed and tested: the class 01 had 2-cyl. drive, the class 02 4-cyl.-drive, but was designed with the assistance of a Prussian factory (Borsig, iirc) that had next to zero experience with 4-cylinder engines. The few 02s that had been built were later converted into 01s...
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,844 Posts
Thanks for the information. There seems to have been a lot of work going on in that period all over Europe into how to make steam locomotives more efficient. It would be interesting to read an account that covered the whole of Europe and not just one country or region.

David
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
QUOTE (dwb @ 18 Nov 2007, 22:38) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Thanks for the information. There seems to have been a lot of work going on in that period all over Europe into how to make steam locomotives more efficient. It would be interesting to read an account that covered the whole of Europe and not just one country or region.

David
I wonder if anyone has done such a book?
It would make an interesting read.
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
7,677 Posts
QUOTE (dwb @ 18 Nov 2007, 11:38) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Thanks for the information. There seems to have been a lot of work going on in that period all over Europe into how to make steam locomotives more efficient. It would be interesting to read an account that covered the whole of Europe and not just one country or region.
There is just such a book (only in German to the best of my knowledge) with a title on the lines of 'Der Dampf-Lok Welt-Historiches Teknik' (Global technical history of the steam locomotive). It's a long time since I looked at a copy, but it certainly appeared to be very comprehensive. Lovely information on things like 'Doppel-Crampton'!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·


Bit of an update on this one. It is now due in December apparently.

It was considered one of the most beautiful Prussian locomotives. Developed from two predecessor models, was the Schnellzuglok S9 run with an additional axle and a more efficient boilers equipped and reached 110 km / h top speed. Designed and built by Hanomag in Hanover, were from 1908 99 pieces delivered. After the First World War were numerous locomotives to Belgium and France, with the Belgian state railway was the S9 until after the Second World War in use. Some 60 years after phasing it comes as a model of H0 BRAWA back. As a novelty in the form of best original fidelity and fascinating detail.

The heart and guts were examined at the S9 run tests in the workshop BRAWA

Deliveries of the S9 to the dealer is planned for December. But initially turning a prototype of his last series model test laps in the BRAWA workshop in Rosneath. The locomotive must be in continuous prove that it is necessary to stress gradients and cope with many cars. Moreover, the decoder adapted and the Sound Bites vote. Besides the technical tests will run the optical fine-tuning. The paint colors are the first models are compared and optimized, form details will be reviewed and the tools for mass production voted. The goal: maximize the original fidelity. It works with almost Prussian BRAWA Ernst.


Can't wait for this one. It is looking really good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,611 Posts
I remember about 3 years ago when Brawa announced the class 56 (bavarin G4/5) October release that slipped out to January. Still the class 56 was worth waiting for, so this will again be a special model from Brawa.

John
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
QUOTE (john woodall @ 7 Nov 2008, 15:16) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I remember about 3 years ago when Brawa announced the class 56 (bavarin G4/5) October release that slipped out to January. Still the class 56 was worth waiting for, so this will again be a special model from Brawa.

John
It sounds to me that the delays are due to quality control and testing. I'm happy to wait for that.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top