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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've always been fascinated by Brunel's Broad Gauge, partly because of the sheer size of it I think! With a possible move up into the loft next year I am hoping to incorporate a loop of mixed gauged track on the new layout.

Does anybody here have experience of broad gauge modelling in 4mm scale? Any hints and tips to pass on?

I think that custom track is the only option, which means improving my soldering skills! I have also been looking at suitable kits from IKB Models and the Broad Gauge Society.

The plan would be to have two main loops with the outer one being dual gauge. This would make it easier to lay a dual gauge section of track into the fiddle yard that I intend to put underneath the main layout.

Regards,

Dan
 

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JOIN THE BGS. they are such a freindly bunch even if they are GWR!
i have done a few test pieces to find out if i could do it and they turned out very sucessfull.

try and get as many pictures as you can. there is a book called brunels broad gauge (ian allen i think) but its out of print. your library might have a copy. sorry i cant remember who its by.

kay butler of IKB models is a wealth of usefull information. (she is also building a layout from foam board which i am very interested to see how it turns out.

remember that a 4mm broad gauge yoyout takes up as much room as a 7mm layout.

buy some tillig duel gauge trackwork so you can look at it for reference.

Peter
 

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You might also considering visiting the Great Western Society at Didcot. They have built a replica of Firefly and run it on a section of broad gauge track from time to time.

David
 

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Join the broad Gauge Society, they are the only place you can get broad gauge bridge rail, One thing is if you are considering modelling the broad gauge the only option is P4 standards as the depth of flange of the on OO or EM standard wheels is greater than the 40thou depth of the bridge rail section, also due to the very tight clearances on loco and rolling stock you will not be able to accommodate anything in either width of tyres or diameter of wheels within the available kits.

If you are planning mixed gauge then the same will apply to standard gauge stock and even if you used 16.5 gauge then standard RTR rolling stock would end up running on the flanges rather than the railhead. Also mixing 00 and 28.08 will look very odd too the narrow gauge being just over half the distance of the broad gauge.

Don't let what I have said put you off check out details on http://www.broadgauge.org.uk/ or come along to the Broad Gauge Society Show in Newbury in September

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE (David bigcheeseplant @ 23 Jul 2006, 11:25) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>If you are planning mixed gauge then the same will apply to standard gauge stock and even if you used 16.5 gauge then standard RTR rolling stock would end up running on the flanges rather than the railhead. Also mixing 00 and 28.08 will look very odd too the narrow gauge being just over half the distance of the broad gauge.
Ah! That was the original intention! Might have to re-think this...

Thanks for all the suggestions - a return visit to Didcot is certainly called for to have a look at Firefly.

Regards,

Dan
 

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Modelling the Broad Gauge has a major advantage in that stations and trains are much shorter, a loco and 4 or 5 coach can be accommodated in around 2 foot in 4mm scale, plus stations can be accommodated in a much smaller area too. Modelling the broad gauge does need some skill as building track and stock tends to require a soldering iron and some experience in assembling etched kits etc.

I am currently building a model of High Wycombe Station as originally built in 1854 and in broad gauge and without any compression can fit the whole station site into 10 foot. This includes the train shed, engine shed, good shed, turntable, loading dock, and water tank and coal stage.

If any one has photo or information on Wycombe station please let me know. This old station was only in use for 10 years when it was converted to a goods shed, it still survives today as a tyre and exhaust centre, plus has the distinction of being designed by Mr. I.K. Brunel, I have copies of his letters regarding this.

David
 
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