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QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 28 Oct 2007, 07:48) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Building accuracy in N depends on the protot6ype you are modelling - 2mm scale, EU/US N and UK N are all quite different scales as far as rolling stock/loco's are concerned. (2mm = 1:152, EU/US N = 1:160, UK N = 1:144 - as you can see that is considerably larger (1:144 is 11% bigger than 1:160)

Not quite right - British N gauge is a scale ratio of 1:148 not 1:144 - that is a model aeroplane scale and out of interest Japanese N gauge is 1:150.

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QUOTE (Asterix @ 27 Oct 2007, 12:10) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'll try counting courses then!

Counting brick courses in N gauge is not really recommended or very helpful for you. It would have to assume that each course was accurate to N gauge scale ratio whereas you're interested in the overall height of the building. Any slight inaccuracy in brick size will simply be multiplied by the numner of courses;- amplifying the error.

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QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 30 Oct 2007, 13:41) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>While we are being pedantic, gauge and scales aren't interchangeable terms... Japanese/UK/EU/US N *gauge* is 9mm: Its the "Scales" that vary

Yep, you're right that scale and gauge aren't interchangeable but as the 'N' in 'N gauge' stands for 'nine mm' it means that 'N gauge' is okay as a stand alone description and that "N gauge is 9mm" is really tautology. Plus it's commonly acceptable to add the scale/ratio before or after 'N gauge' to help confirm both the gauge and the scale and thus the country; as in 'the scale/ratio in Japanese N gauge is 1:150'. Strangely in America they say/use 'N scale' which is more incorrect as 9mm is not the scale.


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QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 31 Oct 2007, 13:33) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>not to mention the atrocuiosly big wheel flanges in N

Correct - there's no need to mention it as the shiny wheels with large pizza cutting flanges is old hat in N gauge now. These days most new stock has blackened finer profile wheels to NMRA RP25 standards - the same as used by many other scales.

QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 31 Oct 2007, 13:33) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>the UK modelling scene, which is now fragmented between 16.5, EM and P4.

and I understand that '00FS' champions want to adopt 16.2mm as their gauge standard. At least in N gauge it's all 9mm rather than the choice of 16.2, 16.5, 18, 18.2 and 18.87 or whatever ............


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QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 1 Nov 2007, 02:59) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>N is certainly the only RTR scale thats managed to keep semi-sensible consistency in track standards....

Unfortunately in N gauge it's the scale ratios that vary - but at least it's by country modelled. However, with track/wheels there has over the reent years been an adoption of improved standards with code 55 rail (down from code 80), RP25 wheel profiles and a slight widening of the BTB. But I'd like to see further improvements to become a sort of N Finescale standard (as with OO finescale) with reduced flangeways, scale sleeper size and spacing (peco track is a curious compromise) and finer point design - especially in the blade area where even with code 55 points the blade is code 80 - all without the need to go 2mm and change the gauge as well as scale like with the finescale OO doesn't necessarilly mean going EM or P4.

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QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 1 Nov 2007, 02:59) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The flanges are certainly far better than they were, but all are still visibly large

Not for 'modern' modellers where the wheels are small, the flanges are even smaller these days, are less obvious and mostly hidden behind bogie sideframes. It maybe obvious for steam era enthusiasts where the wheels are larger and their whole circumferance is generally on view - however, you've obviously not seen the wheels on the new Farish Jublee which has very fine wheels and flanges to the extent than many N gauge enthusiasts actually thought they were 2mm finesale ones - and had to have it confirned by Bachmann they weren't.

Still the overriding benefit in looks for N gauge over OO is that the track doesn't look so horribly narrow gauge - and it's obvious even when there are no trains of either steam or modern outline running.

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QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 1 Nov 2007, 12:36) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm VERY pleased to see the progressive improvements with UK N scale overall - with many of the original Farish etc I do install work with, and given the many wasted hours of gentle tweaking some take to get an even reasonable result with, I am frequently tempted to adjust them with a 5 pound hammer :) :).

I have very, very few steamers, they don't really float my boat, but here's a recent acquisition. I think the wheels could be improved a little (not so much the flange size but the tread width) but other than that it's almost hard to believe it a straight out of the box RTR N gauge loco especially compared to stuff from ten years ago;

 
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