Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
HI ALL IM NEW TO ALL THIS AND WAS WONDERING IF ANYONE COULD ADVISE ME ON THE BEST GLUE TO USE FOR CONSTRUCTING CARD BUILDINGS
CHEERS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Hi Andy and welcome.
I don't know enough to advise you of the best - all I know is that I have used basic PVA glue and it works very well, but don't get any on the outer surfaces [which is what I did] or you'll be sorry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
QUOTE (mikelhh @ 10 Dec 2006, 22:25) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi Andy and welcome.
I don't know enough to advise you of the best - all I know is that I have used basic PVA glue and it works very well, but don't get any on the outer surfaces [which is what I did] or you'll be sorry.
YEAH I KNOW WHAT YOU MEAN MIKE........TRIED THAT BEFORE.....I'M USING BOSTIK MULTI PURPOSE JUST NOW BUT THE STUFF IS SO STRINGY ITS A REAL PAIN IN THE PROVERBIAL TRYING TO GLUE SMALL PIECES
 

·
Chief mouser
Joined
·
11,775 Posts
QUOTE (mikelhh @ 10 Dec 2006, 22:25) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I don't know enough to advise you of the best - all I know is that I have used basic PVA glue and it works very well, but don't get any on the outer surfaces [which is what I did] or you'll be sorry.

I too normally use PVA woodworking glue,but would advise using a "known" brand. For those fiddly bits you can always use the nice wooden stirring spatulas that Costa Coffee etc let you remove by the handful!

Regards

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
Hi Andy and welcome.

I too would say use white woodworking glue (PVA). I suggest you use an old modeling paintbrush to apply the glue and keep a pot of water handy to store the brush in between applications. A quick rinse and wipe with an old cloth before the next gluing operation and you always have a fresh brush to work with.

As a newcomer to the forum, I suggest you look up the thread "Cardboard Modelling on Barchester", where over a period of time we had an online tutorial and discussion on the subject. I'm sure you'll find it interesting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
Hi Andy and welcome to the forum.
I would agree with the previous comments. I have used many types of glues on cardboard in the past and of them all Woodworking PVA is probably the number one for me. (Resin W for example).
The worst has to be normal UHU, not because it doesn't stick but because of the strings of glue it leaves behind which automatically attach themselves to everything nearby and can ruin a model. I don't like using Impact adhesives either such as Evo Stick etc as these are rather nasty glues for close up modelling work with the risk of breathing in the fumes. As stated, go for PVA. Any overspills or errors can be simply removed with a damp cloth or sponge while the glue is still wet and most of them dry to a transparent finish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
cheers for all your help guys i will post a pic of my first finished item when i actually get it finished....(hopefully tonight )
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,852 Posts
I've been using PVA glue which I bought off the shelf in WHSmiths. I "control" the application by dispensing a smallish blob onto some cast off card and transfer it from there to the edges which need gluing by cocktail stick. You can see the results in my blog entry "Another brick in the wall".

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
827 Posts
Hi Andy and welcome to the forum.
I would agree with the previous comments. I have used many types of glues on cardboard in the past and of them all Woodworking PVA is probably the number one for me. (Resin W for example).
[/quote/

Avoid the really cheap craft PVA unless you know the quality. Some can be quite watery and cause wrinkling of thinner card or paper.

I find PVA takes too long to dry so...

The worst has to be normal UHU, not because it doesn't stick but because of the strings of glue it leaves
... UHU, Bostik and generic equivalents are my favourites, in the solvent versions. Use them like contact adhesive, ie apply and leave for 5-10 mins (while you cut out another part) to go tacky and they stick instantly. I don't like the solvent free versions and the solvent ones are still available so I guess there is a real difference.

The trick I've found is to let the glue run out under gravity with only the slightest squeeze of the tube. This makes it much easier to control and avoid stringing. You'll still get some stringing but think about the direction you move the tube away from the workpiece and it's easy to avoid spoiling a visible part.

Andrew Crosland
 

·
Chief mouser
Joined
·
11,775 Posts
QUOTE (SPROGman @ 13 Dec 2006, 14:02) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>apply and leave for 5-10 mins (while you cut out another part) to go tacky and they stick instantly.
Andrew Crosland

This also applies to the quality PVA adhhesives, I suppose it is fair to say that the golden rule of any wood type glues/adhesives is let it go tacky before attempting to position the parts. I would also add that I have tried Bostik solvent free and it is useless!!

However i have used UHU and others for some jobs (sticking trees down and securing the edge of grass matting).

Hope this helps.

Regards

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Super glue is accelerated by moisture, and PVA is largely water. To hold a large/long joint whilst it dries, it is quite possible to apply some 'tack weld' spots of superglue gel in the glue line, and then offer up the two pieces. The s'glue will grab after a few seconds, and hold all steady until the PVA sets. It's how I glue the thin wood stiffeners I put on the inside of my card roofs, especially. Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
827 Posts
QUOTE (dooferdog @ 13 Dec 2006, 19:30) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Super glue is accelerated by moisture, and PVA is largely water. To hold a large/long joint whilst it dries, it is quite possible to apply some 'tack weld' spots of superglue gel in the glue line, and then offer up the two pieces. The s'glue will grab after a few seconds, and hold all steady until the PVA sets. It's how I glue the thin wood stiffeners I put on the inside of my card roofs, especially. Good Luck!
That's an interesting technique.

I knew about the moisture, but was surpised to see that the instructions on the UHU superglue I bought the other day advised breathing on the parts before glueing them.

Also in the instructions, UK users who need to unstick their fingers are advised to soak in warm soapy water and gently peel apart. AUS users are advised to use a solvent.

Must be all that sun makes the aussie's skin tougher than our delicate stuff. LOL!

Andrew Crosland
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
Don't worry Superglue comes unstuck in water at just below boiling point.

Worst glue to humans has to be hot melt glue from a glue gun.... Get some on your hands and..... 'Ouch' it hurts, and then you automatically use your other hand to remove the problem and 'Ouch' that hurts too! as it then sticks to both hands
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,498 Posts
Re getting hot-melt glue on fingers with a resultant 'war-dance' - can I suggest a small bowl of cold water kept nearby? If you do get glue on any finger(s) place them straight in the water - this will immediately cool and solidify the glue, making it easier to remove and taking the heat away from the skin, minimising any burn.
Regards,
John Webb
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top