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QUOTE (CeeDeeI @ 2 Aug 2006, 18:46) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Here we have the next stage of construction with the completed girders. The Class66 is just trying things on for size.


Sorry to retread a bit, I take it the supports are all made of cardboard, did you paint them first, before fitting to platform? Also the platform surfaces look very realistic, did you draw the slabs first, using a thin pen before doing a wash with paint over the top? and are they groved or smooth? Thanks for the tips by the way
 

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QUOTE (CeeDeeI @ 4 Sep 2006, 18:39) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Here you can see that the jetty has had all the bits added to it from the previous photograph plus a few drums and crates. There is much more to add once the model has been installed on the layout and a friend has given me a plastic kit of a crane which should be suitable for the jetty. I am not a lover of plastic kits, much preferring to make my own stuff and having looked at the bits and pieces that make up the kit I cannot see a problem with making them from card.


Is that top to the jetty made from very thin strips, or one piece that has been scribed, its impossible to tell and it looks excellent by the way!
 

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Eye site no problem, technique not so good. Have done a number of Metcalf kits without any problem, but find the plastic ones to be more of a fiddle, especially in N. Where do you get the inspiration for the designs though? Imagination, or photos of the real thing, I suppose there are plenty of wooden Jettys in Spain?
 

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QUOTE (CeeDeeI @ 13 Sep 2006, 12:39) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>No Jeff, not plastic but card with a layer of plaster which is then scribed for the brickwork. The beauty of this is that you are not tied to any manufacturers output but can have whatever finish you need.
Here is a picture of the second crane in action in the Goods Yard. Again everything here is of card or paper except for the milk churns.

Hi, some great modelling there. I take it you used some brickpaper for the platform sides, where do you source that from. And the pipes look good too, are these drinking straws cut into short lengths and painted CeeDee? Think I'm getting the idea of this card and BBQ sticks approach to modelling. Cheap and looks just as good as plastic when carefully worked. Plastered brick face looks superb as well. Top work!
 

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QUOTE (CeeDeeI @ 13 Sep 2006, 15:00) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi keekster. The goods platform is part of the Metcalfe card kit. They are a really good series. The pipework is paper from the printer, ordinary cheap stuff, cut into strips, rolled round a paint brush handle and then a touch of PVA slid along the long edge. Then it's just a matter of continuing the roll with the fingers. About three or four minutes practice and you will have the technique off easily. Also great for chimney pots and works to almost any diameter. The fuel tanks on the Barchester diesel refuelling point were done in the same way with the same material.
Right enough I recognise it now, however, from your previous posts I note you do use brick paper from time to time, where do you source this from? Rolls of paper, thats great I would never have known.
 

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Bob
I would appreciate your views on this first attempt layout plan. Its OO gauge end to end layout. The layout is based on a real branch terminus (Dalkeith), early 60's. I have had to remove a siding, and have changed the two platform sidings into a single bay. The town was a short branch off the Waverley route. Although there were not industries off it, too make it more interesting I have included two. I fancy a paper mill to the south (could do with some sample pictures of a small one, cant find anything of use on web). Not sure what the north industry should be, but it should be something that existed in the District, ie wood mill, carpet factory or mine, but not much space for something large scale, open to suggestions. The branch line off the branch line, if you follow, is too a depot, which is a work of fiction. Hardengreen was a junctions, a series of transfer sidings, and a goods yard in reality, on the Waverley route itself, but it did have a single loco, stationed there to help long trains up a steep incline to fala, and that's all the excuse I need. I have shown a line running off the base boards to the south to give the impression it serves a wider area than just this line. In reality the line was a mile long, but obviously I've had to shrink it to fit. I hope I have managed to break it up to give the feeling that its longer than it is. What do you think, open to suggestions for tweaks.
K
 

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Release cross over was a mistake, now corrected. Fiddle yard will only have 2 lines. I plan to use the removable cassette type, to keep its size to a minimum. Engine Shed deliberately oversize really, so I can have somewhere to admire a line up of 4 locos at the same time! That part was inspired by a similarly small sized layout in RM a few years ago.THanks for the comments.
 

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Bob
Need some advice. Have begun making my first scratchbuilt building. Its a good shed based on a real one, will try and scan in image tomorow of an old photo. It is wooden with brick base, and slate roof. I have cut out the sides and the platform is a spare metcalfe offcut. The walls are made from white mounting board, scribed vertically according to your technique to similate tonge and groove boarding. The originl building was painted white. How should I achieve a similar look whist highlighting the scribed surface? Cant see any need to paint it white. Secondly when using the, rather thin brick paper, is it best to cut out the card backing first, prior to gluing on the paper, and triming off any excess, or should I glue it to the card first and cut when dry? Thanks
K
 

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Thanks Bob, I'll have a go with the wash on a piece of scrap card first. I have a numerous tubes of artists acrylic to choose from so should be able to get the right colour. Heres a pic of the building.

I have simplified the roof, into 2 pitches, to make construction easier. I've bought some office gum for the brick paper. Is it best to glue up the card or the paper.
Thanks again
K
 

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QUOTE (Brian @ 9 Oct 2006, 09:53) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi keekster64
No doubt Bob will advise you further on your building requirements.
But perhaps of interest and may be of some help? In the past and still am using mounting card with Superquick papers. (Brick, stone and tile finishes) I have always used ready mixed wallpaper adhesive. A small tub lasts for ages and is around £2.00 in Wilkinson's stores here in the UK. Having cut the paper to slightly over size, I apply a coating of adhesive to the papers back and then carefully lay the paper over the item to be covered. Any door or window openings are cut with a sharp scalpel and folded into and around to the insides of the openings. Prior to cutting bout door and windows you will find the wallpaper adhesive allows nice amount of slip to let the brick courses be aligned.
After a few hours the paper has dried nicely and gives a firm and smooth finish. Any areas around doors and windows or other places that are oversized can then be carefully trimmed with the scalpel.

I have seen others use Woodworking PVA adhesive which sticks well but I have found that it doesn't offer any slip etc to aid alignment etc

I have never tried office gum! I assume this is the glue that used to be used in schools etc and is a golden colour? Does this allow any slip to correct misalignment?
Dont know until I try it Brian. Having wallpapered many a wall, your tip sounds good, and I'm sure I will have some around, although making up a small amount instead of a bucket would be sensible! Any tips on making gutters? The downpipe is easy, wooden BBQ stick but tried to cut a straw in half for the gutter but found it impossible to keep it straight.
K
 

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Thanks Bob, simple and inexpensive solution as always. I really am enjoying figuring out how to put this building together. I'll post some pictures once I start putting it together. Am interested ti here your answer to Brian's post. I have found that Starbucks cup insulators, which are free when you buy a coffee to go, have that corrigated card, which does not need soaking first, but the coverage is rather limited, and I found it hard to cut neatly.
K
 

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Very nice scene Bob. Obviously no Health and safety in Barchester, with an open blade, and quite right too! Where did you get the figures from? Making good progress on my first scratchbuilt model. Will post pictures soon, having a few technical difficulties uploading them to the lap top at present.
 

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Picked up some weather powders yesterday, or rather 50p coloured chalks from a local art shop. So cheap and available in various dirty colours, just a scrape with a blade and you have loads of powder. I suspect the trick is not to get too carried away. An experiment with a scrap piece of card slowed a little goes a long way. I've even got some green to create some moss on the roof and gutters. Photos to follow
 
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