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QUOTE (CeeDeeI @ 13 Sep 2006, 12:39) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>No Jeff, not plastic but card with a layer of plaster which is then scribed for the brickwork. The beauty of this is that you are not tied to any manufacturers output but can have whatever finish you need.
Here is a picture of the second crane in action in the Goods Yard. Again everything here is of card or paper except for the milk churns.

Hi, some great modelling there. I take it you used some brickpaper for the platform sides, where do you source that from. And the pipes look good too, are these drinking straws cut into short lengths and painted CeeDee? Think I'm getting the idea of this card and BBQ sticks approach to modelling. Cheap and looks just as good as plastic when carefully worked. Plastered brick face looks superb as well. Top work!
 

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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
Hi keekster. The goods platform is part of the Metcalfe card kit. They are a really good series. The pipework is paper from the printer, ordinary cheap stuff, cut into strips, rolled round a paint brush handle and then a touch of PVA slid along the long edge. Then it's just a matter of continuing the roll with the fingers. About three or four minutes practice and you will have the technique off easily. Also great for chimney pots and works to almost any diameter. The fuel tanks on the Barchester diesel refuelling point were done in the same way with the same material.
 

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QUOTE (CeeDeeI @ 13 Sep 2006, 15:00) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi keekster. The goods platform is part of the Metcalfe card kit. They are a really good series. The pipework is paper from the printer, ordinary cheap stuff, cut into strips, rolled round a paint brush handle and then a touch of PVA slid along the long edge. Then it's just a matter of continuing the roll with the fingers. About three or four minutes practice and you will have the technique off easily. Also great for chimney pots and works to almost any diameter. The fuel tanks on the Barchester diesel refuelling point were done in the same way with the same material.
Right enough I recognise it now, however, from your previous posts I note you do use brick paper from time to time, where do you source this from? Rolls of paper, thats great I would never have known.
 

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Hi keekster, if you want a very reasonable ready made road surface then try the tarcamadam on this Metcalfe site. There is a generous amount in each pack. Everything depends on the kind of road surface you want to represent from the smooth, modern day tarmac to the rough and rutted country roads of old.

http://www.metcalfemodels.com/acatalog/Bui..._Materials.html

Again for roof tiles in different colours try this site at Superquick.

http://www.superquick.co.uk/d_seriesframes.htm

These different coloured tile papers can be used as is, they can be 'soft'scribed with an old biro tip to give them definition or cut into strips and overlaid with each other. Or, as I tend to do when scratch building, use paper strips of different roughness with the separate tiles nicked and overlaid then coloured and weathered to suit. Weathering will make a big difference to whatever you use for both road surface and roofing.
While having no financial interest in either of the companies mentioned I would heartily endorse all their products.
 

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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
Here are the stables under construction. Comprising two buildings, one enclosed with stable doors and the other an open structure. The almost completed one is all of card while the one at the front has a rear and side walls of card while the framing is made of the large BBQ match sticks and toothpicks for the round side bars. The roofs, of corrugated card, are coloured and weathered as required.

 

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Cee Dee -

What techniques do you use for windows?

I have recently constructed some buildings and the windows were various sizes and shapes. I drew them on an Excel worksheet and printed on transparency film on a laser printer. The advantage is that you can lay out the windows to any grid. So far, I've printed them in black, but will try them in other colours. The method is quick but two dimensional.

Richard Davies
Utah, USA
 

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Discussion Starter · #92 ·
Hi Richard. Nothing fancy with my windows I'm afraid. Each one is cut out from it's card wall, backed with any celluloid type material I happen to have, old packing material, shirt collar stiffeners etc, then the glazing bars are added as needed from slices of white or coloured, usually white, sticky labels. Lentils, sills, fancy brick surrounds and any further exterior decoration added as needed. Doing the windows this way they can be as plain or as fancy as you need, from old warehouses to country hotels. Nothing high tech on Barchester.
 

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>I drew them on an Excel worksheet
That's a really good idea. Is there a particular reason why you chose Excel? I would have chosen Paint myself and used the mega zoom mode to paint pixel by pixel.

I've also wondered about using a 2D CAD package for drawing backscenes of buildings.

David
 

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Bob
I would appreciate your views on this first attempt layout plan. Its OO gauge end to end layout. The layout is based on a real branch terminus (Dalkeith), early 60's. I have had to remove a siding, and have changed the two platform sidings into a single bay. The town was a short branch off the Waverley route. Although there were not industries off it, too make it more interesting I have included two. I fancy a paper mill to the south (could do with some sample pictures of a small one, cant find anything of use on web). Not sure what the north industry should be, but it should be something that existed in the District, ie wood mill, carpet factory or mine, but not much space for something large scale, open to suggestions. The branch line off the branch line, if you follow, is too a depot, which is a work of fiction. Hardengreen was a junctions, a series of transfer sidings, and a goods yard in reality, on the Waverley route itself, but it did have a single loco, stationed there to help long trains up a steep incline to fala, and that's all the excuse I need. I have shown a line running off the base boards to the south to give the impression it serves a wider area than just this line. In reality the line was a mile long, but obviously I've had to shrink it to fit. I hope I have managed to break it up to give the feeling that its longer than it is. What do you think, open to suggestions for tweaks.
K
 

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Release cross over was a mistake, now corrected. Fiddle yard will only have 2 lines. I plan to use the removable cassette type, to keep its size to a minimum. Engine Shed deliberately oversize really, so I can have somewhere to admire a line up of 4 locos at the same time! That part was inspired by a similarly small sized layout in RM a few years ago.THanks for the comments.
 
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