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I'm tempted to have a go at it myself after the recent situation with 2 Metcalfe kits not being the same size.

Also there doesn't seem to be much about in N gauge that is suitable for what I might be planning

Chris
 

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Bob
Need some advice. Have begun making my first scratchbuilt building. Its a good shed based on a real one, will try and scan in image tomorow of an old photo. It is wooden with brick base, and slate roof. I have cut out the sides and the platform is a spare metcalfe offcut. The walls are made from white mounting board, scribed vertically according to your technique to similate tonge and groove boarding. The originl building was painted white. How should I achieve a similar look whist highlighting the scribed surface? Cant see any need to paint it white. Secondly when using the, rather thin brick paper, is it best to cut out the card backing first, prior to gluing on the paper, and triming off any excess, or should I glue it to the card first and cut when dry? Thanks
K
 

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Hi keekster. With regard to the white building. On scribed walls I would always apply a thin coat of paint of the required colour as this accentuates the scribing as you are dealing with two different surfaces, the smooth uncut surface and the rougher finish inside the cut and this produces two different shades of your colour. If you are sure you don't want to do this then get a small off cut of card and scribe it the same as your model then get some white water colour paint with just a touch of black in it and wash it over the surface of the scribed card then quickly wipe it off with a soft piece of cloth. You may have to try it a couple of times till you get the wash right for your building. If this seems a bit drastic then get a very sharp hard pencil and lightly, very lightly, go over the scoring. Again try this on a piece of scrap card first. Finally I have to say it is not a good idea to leave a white card surface in the raw as it is so easily marked and almost impossible to clean without marking it further.
The brick paper is marked out over size, put on after the card is cut out and the surplus folded over the card edges. This also applies to door and window openings.
 

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Thanks Bob, I'll have a go with the wash on a piece of scrap card first. I have a numerous tubes of artists acrylic to choose from so should be able to get the right colour. Heres a pic of the building.

I have simplified the roof, into 2 pitches, to make construction easier. I've bought some office gum for the brick paper. Is it best to glue up the card or the paper.
Thanks again
K
 

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Hi keekster64
No doubt Bob will advise you further on your building requirements.
But perhaps of interest and may be of some help? In the past and still am using mounting card with Superquick papers. (Brick, stone and tile finishes) I have always used ready mixed wallpaper adhesive. A small tub lasts for ages and is around £2.00 in Wilkinson's stores here in the UK. Having cut the paper to slightly over size, I apply a coating of adhesive to the papers back and then carefully lay the paper over the item to be covered. Any door or window openings are cut with a sharp scalpel and folded into and around to the insides of the openings. Prior to cutting bout door and windows you will find the wallpaper adhesive allows nice amount of slip to let the brick courses be aligned.
After a few hours the paper has dried nicely and gives a firm and smooth finish. Any areas around doors and windows or other places that are oversized can then be carefully trimmed with the scalpel.

I have seen others use Woodworking PVA adhesive which sticks well but I have found that it doesn't offer any slip etc to aid alignment etc

I have never tried office gum! I assume this is the glue that used to be used in schools etc and is a golden colour? Does this allow any slip to correct misalignment?
 

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QUOTE (Brian @ 9 Oct 2006, 09:53) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi keekster64
No doubt Bob will advise you further on your building requirements.
But perhaps of interest and may be of some help? In the past and still am using mounting card with Superquick papers. (Brick, stone and tile finishes) I have always used ready mixed wallpaper adhesive. A small tub lasts for ages and is around £2.00 in Wilkinson's stores here in the UK. Having cut the paper to slightly over size, I apply a coating of adhesive to the papers back and then carefully lay the paper over the item to be covered. Any door or window openings are cut with a sharp scalpel and folded into and around to the insides of the openings. Prior to cutting bout door and windows you will find the wallpaper adhesive allows nice amount of slip to let the brick courses be aligned.
After a few hours the paper has dried nicely and gives a firm and smooth finish. Any areas around doors and windows or other places that are oversized can then be carefully trimmed with the scalpel.

I have seen others use Woodworking PVA adhesive which sticks well but I have found that it doesn't offer any slip etc to aid alignment etc

I have never tried office gum! I assume this is the glue that used to be used in schools etc and is a golden colour? Does this allow any slip to correct misalignment?
Dont know until I try it Brian. Having wallpapered many a wall, your tip sounds good, and I'm sure I will have some around, although making up a small amount instead of a bucket would be sensible! Any tips on making gutters? The downpipe is easy, wooden BBQ stick but tried to cut a straw in half for the gutter but found it impossible to keep it straight.
K
 

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Discussion Starter · #111 ·
Apart from the adhesive Brian yours is the same method as I use. My preference is for gum but mainly because here in Spain it is the easiest thing for me to obtain and yes it does have slip qualities but not as much as your paste I would think.
Keekster don't be too concerned about having pure white walls as I'm sure you realise that, unless freshly painted, there will be all kinds of stains from the weather and other things.
 

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Here we have a photograph of the open sided saw shed in two halves. The base and then the walls and roof. It is much easier to build this type of thing in a modular form and then fix the sections together later on. The corrugated roof has been added, but not coloured yet and the base is almost complete. Apart from the roof supports, sawdust and the saw blade, all construction is from card.

 

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For guttering I always use one of two different methods depending on what I am doing. The first and easiest is the use of umbrella ribs. Can't get much simpler than that. If you haven't got an old one then pop into a charity shop and lash out. Make sure you get one with the correct section ribs. You will know as soon as you look at them.
The second method, giving you more choice of size, is to use a thin card. Filing cards are great, easily purchased from Smiths or the Office shop and they are of decent quality card and also useful for much exterior detailing on buildings and other projects, things like window and door lintels and sills for example, or, as in this case, guttering. Using a sharp knife and score a 2mm in from one edge of your card and then cut though the card 2mm from that. When creased along the score this will give you a 'V' shaped section. If this isn't what you want then the same piece of card and score the first line as before then score another 2mm from that and finally cut through the card 2mm from the last score. This will give you a very nice 'U' section gutter in 4mm when creased along the score lines. All you have to do is then cut to length. If your card isn't long enough then make two sections and join together with a small length, about 4-5mm of the same section. When coloured this will look just like the real thing.
Takes time to explain but about two minutes to make for each length, if that.
When you have your guttering then it depends on the roof overhang as to how to fasten it to the building. If the overhang is very small then one side of the gutter can go directly on the side of the wall but if the overhang is larger then you will need two or three spacers glued on the wall first to bring the guttering into the correct position.
Collector boxes for the guttering are just as easily made from the same card. Mark out the front and ends of the box on your card in one length and cut out. Then score vertically where the ends meet the front of the box. When folded you now have a three sided box which is glued to the wall in the appropriate place.
 

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Hi Bob.
Couple of Q's for you...
1) What is the corrugated roof made from?? I have tried the corrugated inners from cartons but I can't seem to get the corrugated card to lay flat once it's been soaked to remove the two outer cards (Normally one printed and one brown inner face). So what's yours made of and its secret?

2) I'm trying to roof over a station foot bridge with corrugated card (With little success at the moment!). Your curved corrugated roof is really very nice but shouldn't the corrugations run the other way?? Just thinking of it if it were real and how any rain water would collect in each corrugation and not run off! Though, perhaps I'm looking at it wrong?

Keep up the excellent work, it's charming and also very enlightening on how you make these items.
All the best.
Brian
 

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Hi Brian. The roofing comes from a pack of corrugated packing 'paper' that I bought when I was in the UK a couple of years ago. It comes in about A4 size and I bought it from one of these cheapo book shops that sells cheap books, games, writing materials etc. They sell it for using as packing for your parcels and envelopes that you don't want bending. I think it must be fairly common so Smiths might sell it or the large Office depots.
With regard to this roof I was hoping that no one would notice. I have cut it from what I had left and there wasn't enough width to cover the model the correct way round with the neccessary overlaps so it is just resting on there for the photograph. I am waiting on a fresh supply that a friend is bringing out here for me when he visits.
So you got me there eagle eyes, nice one.
If you can't locate any and you aren't in too much of a hurry you could e-mail me your address and I will send you a sheet from my fresh supply.
I have just done a quick Google for corrugated card and there are plenty of online suppliers and shops in the UK, perhaps one of them is near you or you could deal on line.
 

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Thanks Bob, simple and inexpensive solution as always. I really am enjoying figuring out how to put this building together. I'll post some pictures once I start putting it together. Am interested ti here your answer to Brian's post. I have found that Starbucks cup insulators, which are free when you buy a coffee to go, have that corrigated card, which does not need soaking first, but the coverage is rather limited, and I found it hard to cut neatly.
K
 

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Hi CeeDee, K,

Packs of 'Sun' dishwasher tablets (or I suppose any heavy, compact product) are made of a very fine corrugated card that needs only a ltlle soaking to remove the brown inner layer. See 'Modelling from waste products' thread in this part of the forum.

CeeDe, found the car keys to access the camera 3 days before going on hoiday when opening the tool bag to get small hammer to break side window to get in for spare keys....yes, I know, Duh!
Good luck with building, K.
 
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