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That body is repairable with a little work with plasticard and filler. While you are at it, it would be worthwhile to remove the moulded on handrails and insert wire replacements.

I have repaired Triang/Hornby bodies like that before; a Pannier tank which had a large triangular chunk out of the rear bunker and buffer beam, and a Standard 3MT tank with similar damage plys a bit of the front buffer beam missing as well. Just use lots of solvent to fuse the plastic replacement bits in place and allow plenty of setting time before filling, filing and painting.

Of course, you could buy a complete replacement body from the likes of Modelspares or East Kent Models - they aren't all that expensive. On the other hand, there is more of a sense of achievement if you can do it all yourself (like you, I like the challenge) - and you save having to oil the hinges on your wallet!!!


If you were prepared to spend a little extra, you could also get some brass extras, such as the roof fan grille and fan, which would also allow you to correct the position of the fan - something Triang-Hornby got wrong originally as it should be off centre. While the Heljan Hymek is better, the Triang/Hornby one was never a bad model to start with. I have one which is in the process of being detailed with brass fan, separate handrails, etc. and I twin-motored it and through wired all the pick-ups. It runs very smoothly and will pull anything I put behind it (not quite as smooth or quiet as the Heljan mech but will still crawl along reliably if asked to do so), and it looks quite alright parked right next to the Heljan Hymek.
 

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Snap!!



Sorry it has taken so long to get a reasonable picture up. It looks like you have done very much thesame as i have. My cut was made in the middle of the fuel tanks because I wanted to allow for more strengthening material, but I knew the join would be much harder to disguise. From your pics it looks like you have done a much neater job than I managed.

I still have to add the separate wire handrails and brass turned horns too - neither of these things are in my pic.

Keep going, you're doing a good job there - nad you have overtaken me, I think!!


One other thing, though. Be careful what decoder you use, as these motors can have a fairly heavy current draw.
 

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I would definitely NOT use the Hornby one, as they are rated at only 0.5 amp continuous.

If you are using a cheapy decoder, Bachmann's one might be a better bet as it is a cut-down ESU rated at 1.0 amp continuous, with a higher rating for short bursts.

Better still, if your budget can stretch to it, one of the higher rated Lenz or TCS decoders would be the go. TCS have the advantage of their "goof-proof" warranty, which means that if you blow it up within a year of purchase, they (or the retailer) will replace it free of charge, whether or not it was your fault. The T1 with two functions is rated at 1.3 amps continuous, 2.0 amps overload.

The more recent Hornby decoders (like the R8249) do give quite smooth control in Hornby's own newer steam locomotives, so I'm not being anti-Hornby here, just practical!
 
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