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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are those brushes that attach to the controller any good? Other mthods? I am after a cheap but reliable way of cleaning and keeping clean loco wheels.....any advice please!
 

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QUOTE (screwy @ 12 Apr 2008, 11:52) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Are those brushes that attach to the controller any good? Other mthods? I am after a cheap but reliable way of cleaning and keeping clean loco wheels.....any advice please!

Yes, they are - Hornby do (or used to do) one & it's one of the very few Hornby items we posses.

Trix also do a good one cat # 66602 although this one sits on the track & the loco sits on top of it.
 
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QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 12 Apr 2008, 11:21) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Yes, they are - Hornby do (or used to do) one & it's one of the very few Hornby items we posses.

Trix also do a good one cat # 66602 although this one sits on the track & the loco sits on top of it.

Hiya

Wheels are like track - anything abrasive is a bad idea and puts grooves in the surface that actually make them dirty. You need your rails and wheels to be very highly polished and you can do this by using a metal polish or lots of running. Best bet for cleaning track is lighter fuel in a CMX track cleaner and for wheels, lighter fuel on a jiffy cloth. Hold it over a spare bit of powered track and let the loco spin its wheels for a few seconds. Remember though that cleaning the loco wheels is a complete waste of time if you don't clean the stock wheels too. Lighter fuel and cotton buds do the trick.

Cheers

Jim
 

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We have never come across problems using either the Hornby type brush or the Trix one, provided they are used gently.

Plenty of running is probably the best best but not all of us are able to do this. Lighter fuel & other solvents are fine if used very carefully.

What metal polish do you use - all of those I have used before (in non-model railway applications) have been abrasive, probably more so than the "wire brushes" used gently, and they leave a residue.

Track cleaning is always a diverse subject - everyone has there own idea's & methods, what works for one may not work for another.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Has anyone tried WD40? It has made both my locos run much smoother and cleans as well, but not yet tried it on the track or wheel themselves.
 

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I find that methylated spirit does a better job of cleaning grime off track although I believe that the ultimate degreaser is carbon tetrachloride which, I recall from seafaring days long ago , was used to clean electrical contacts on the ship's gyroscope. It does occur to me however that carbon tet. was perhaps used by decree owing to the fact that it is non-flammable which meths is certainly not and lighter fuel is even worse.
Does anyone use the Peco rail cleaner ( the rubber). Seems to shine up the dirtier stretches of track but secondary use of a good meths rub works wonders.

Tiebar
 

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QUOTE (tiebar @ 13 Apr 2008, 13:19) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Does anyone use the Peco rail cleaner ( the rubber). Seems to shine up the dirtier stretches of track but secondary use of a good meths rub works wonders.

Tiebar

Although the Peco one is good for really dirty track it does leave a residue behind that needs cleaning with something like meths or surgical spirit.

The track rubbers from Roco, Fleischmann & (I think) Express Models are much softer, less aggressive & do not leave that residue, but do the same job.
 

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QUOTE (screwy @ 13 Apr 2008, 17:21) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Has anyone tried WD40? It has made both my locos run much smoother and cleans as well, but not yet tried it on the track or wheel themselves.

**I hope you didn't spray it into the loco... it will soften the brushes and as DB said, what seems like an improvement now will be a crippling later. I'm honestly not exaggerating to say that WD40 and similar type producs have killed more loco's than any other product type.

Peco's "electrolube" comes second in the mass murder lineup - it attacks some plastics and is horrid stuff.

None of those "toolkit in a can" products are good for our loco's - a methodical cleaning followed by a very tiny bit of oil on all bearings and the slightest smear of a good teflon based grease on gears are all they need for perfect running.

What you do NOT want is any of the workshop brands or any form of 3-1in-1 oil or similar - they migrate everywhere that they should not be. You want oils that will stay where yiou place them.

need good oil and grease? - try a fishing gear shop or anywhere that sells "superlube" oil and grease. that brand and other oils/greases sold for fishing reels are very stable and stay where you put them.... For those who can find one, products from high quality watchmakers supplies places are excellent too.

Richard
 

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I see Peco have replaced electrolube with powerlube. Is it the same stuff with a new name?
 

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QUOTE (poliss @ 13 Apr 2008, 23:24) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I see Peco have replaced electrolube with powerlube. Is it the same stuff with a new name?

**Who knows - either way, I'd still use superlube oils or those from the fishing gear shop than the hobby shop!

Richard
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 13 Apr 2008, 15:15) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>**I hope you didn't spray it into the loco... it will soften the brushes and as DB said, what seems like an improvement now will be a crippling later. I'm honestly not exaggerating to say that WD40 and similar type producs have killed more loco's than any other product type.

Peco's "electrolube" comes second in the mass murder lineup - it attacks some plastics and is horrid stuff.

None of those "toolkit in a can" products are good for our loco's - a methodical cleaning followed by a very tiny bit of oil on all bearings and the slightest smear of a good teflon based grease on gears are all they need for perfect running.

What you do NOT want is any of the workshop brands or any form of 3-1in-1 oil or similar - they migrate everywhere that they should not be. You want oils that will stay where yiou place them.

need good oil and grease? - try a fishing gear shop or anywhere that sells "superlube" oil and grease. that brand and other oils/greases sold for fishing reels are very stable and stay where you put them.... For those who can find one, products from high quality watchmakers supplies places are excellent too.

Richard

Er, oops then. Yes I have done as you have said and sprayed the lot. How does WD40 attack brushes then? Curious to know as my understanding of the the product is that it is a spray oil mixed with evaporating spirit essentially. I use it professionally on electrical motors and it seem to have no long term detrimental effects? Tell me I want to know what I#ve broke now!!
 

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I have always found the Gaugemaster track rubber to be good as it is less hard than the Hornby or Peco rubbers and is a lot larger. I got one for just £3.50 (its £4.50 from Gaugemaster) from Model zone, the unlikeliest place for a bargin.
 

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QUOTE (screwy @ 14 Apr 2008, 17:57) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Er, oops then. Yes I have done as you have said and sprayed the lot. How does WD40 attack brushes then? Curious to know as my understanding of the the product is that it is a spray oil mixed with evaporating spirit essentially. I use it professionally on electrical motors and it seem to have no long term detrimental effects? Tell me I want to know what I#ve broke now!!


***Brushes and any kind of oil do not mix - it softens them and they will rapidly deposit carbon in the commutator slots, lowering efficiency and increasing current draw. Take out the brushes and soak in something that will remove the oils, and then air dry before replacing.

It will laso attack some plastics with time, making them brittle - there are lots of claims for WD40, but its not meant for most of the things its used on... certainly best left to use on things other than model railways.

Richard
DCCconcepts
 

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I'm with Jim s-w on the wheel cleaning thing, cotton buds and lighter fluid work well also. For track cleaning the best thing I've found is the Centerline device "http://www.cchobbies.com/trackcleaners/cleaners.htm" to be very good. It is a tad pricey though. The fluid I use is "Goo Gone" (with a lemony fresh scent) but I don't know if its available in the UK. Having said that I still use a Peco rubber.
 

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Mornin' All
I'm sure I've seen Isopropyl alcohol used with cotton buds for wheel/track cleaning. I've not used it myself but it's available from Maplins and sound ideal. Anyone here used it?
Steve.
 

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Hi

My 2 cents WD40 or Water Dispersant #40 tested by NASA, that was its original use hence the name #40 tested. So not a good product to use as a lubricant for all the points mentioned above.

Rubber 3 basic types first 2 Natural and E.P.D.M both don't like hydrocarbons or oil based products(WD40). Generally good wearing properties. Who has seen rubber swell and fall apart because it has medium term contact with oil based products.
3rd type Buna or nitrile rubber, better chemical and hydrocarbon resistance but average wear properties, cost is also a factor, more expensive.

Engineering Plastics, worked in this industry 10+ years and I can tell you nylon 6 or 66 PA make great gears. Most of our gears in loco. Problem hydroscopic material, it absorbs water. This is good and bad, good that it helps with the dampening but may tighten up tolerances on OD and end up lose on ID. WD 40 has a long term effect on nylons.

What to use, as mentioned above but I have a tube of food or (FDA) approved grease, very light, neutral and works a treat at this stage.

Hope that helps

m
 
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