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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wondering how other people have done this. My layout contains a fairly long section of elevated track. To carry it I basically bodged a 'system' using thin ply for the trackbed, topped with cork tile, battened underneath by a strip of 1" x 1/4" timber, the whole thing built in strips and glued/nailed together. Then the trackbed held aloft by pairs of timber struts. I've found that this 'works' insofar as I have managed to create a fairly sound trackbed with gentle gradients and plenty of flexibility. What have other people done?
 

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I once built a layout with a long raised track bed. Once the track was at the desired height, which was about 3 inches above the baseboard top, i just used a length of 3" wide timber to support the plywood track bed. The ranp section was achieved by cutting the baseboard either side of the desired track position for about 4ft then lifting it to the desired height. As the baseboard was again made from ply it only got supported once there was room under the raised section.
 

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QUOTE (Mike H. @ 2 Dec 2008, 12:55) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Wondering how other people have done this. My layout contains a fairly long section of elevated track. To carry it I basically bodged a 'system' using thin ply for the trackbed, topped with cork tile, battened underneath by a strip of 1" x 1/4" timber, the whole thing built in strips and glued/nailed together. Then the trackbed held aloft by pairs of timber struts. I've found that this 'works' insofar as I have managed to create a fairly sound trackbed with gentle gradients and plenty of flexibility. What have other people done?

Hello.
Here are some photos of what I am doing with my layout. I have several elevated sections.
It may be of some help to you.

http://s285.photobucket.com/albums/ll68/to...nav_album_album
 

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***Hi Tony - its while since I looked in on your progress - you've done lots in a single year and its coming on very nicely - Great to see your plan advancing so well and remaining so consistent to your original concept... and its clear you are doing something very special with that backscene painting - very nice.

well done indeed!

Richard
 

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Hi Mike.

It sounds as though your 'bodged together' system is working and is not all that different from my own.

I'm using 9mm ply for the track bed which is supported on 12mm ply risers fixed at right angles to the direction of the track at 250mm centres. The risers are bolted to the main baseboard framing, which is a grid of 150mm wide x 12mm ply strips. The risers are adjustable by using slightly elongated holes in them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi Trevor

I fear you flatter me. My baseboards are 'solid' not open-frame (which I would have preferred but no way have the skill to construct). To be honest, considering how 'horrible' the construction of my elevated section is I am very surprised it works as well as it does (it is actually the least problematic part of the layout, amazingly).
To recap, the trackbed is actually 3mm cork tile, cut and shaped to fit, glued onto 3mm (!) ply, underlain by strips of 10mm pine and the whole thing supported on twin pine gantries spaced about 12" apart; all glued/nailed together in a rather ad-hoc fashion. It seems strong - certainly strong enough to support trains and the bodgery is in the process of being hidden by scenery. But some of the people on this forum would have kittens if they saw it!

Mike
 

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Don't do yourself an injustice Mike. If it works then who is anyone to say it's 'bodgery'. Certainly not me.

I must admit I was a little concerned at the 3mm ply spanning 12" for the track bed but, provided the pine stiffeners are from reasonable quality timber, then you should be OK. Personally I would have preferred to use 75mm (minimum) x 12mm ply on edge as stiffeners which would then have created the classic 'L' or 'T' girder system. If it's not too late maybe you could give that some thought.

Failing that you should give everything a good coat (or 3) of paint or varnish to stop the timber from drying out and warping. It also stops nails from falling out, which they have a habit of doing as the timber dries out. It's always best to glue and screw.

Look forward to seeing some pictures once you have it all put together.
 

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QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 10 Jan 2009, 15:05) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>***Hi Tony - its while since I looked in on your progress - you've done lots in a single year and its coming on very nicely - Great to see your plan advancing so well and remaining so consistent to your original concept... and its clear you are doing something very special with that backscene painting - very nice.

well done indeed!

Richard

Hi Richard.
Thank you for your kind words. My partner & I usually try & get in a few hours on Sundays when we have a chance. She is responsible for the background painting as she is very much into art. I am doing some scenic work at the moment & hope to get some more photos up soon. It's a work in progress so if it's never finished is of no importance. There are very few hobbies where you can practice so many skills & have the chance to learn new ones as you can with Model Railways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Trevor - thanks again - it's not too late for some more painting/varnishing, which I will do. There are some screws in there as well as nails. My main concern when constructing the elevated sections was getting the gradients right. Again, what I have done is probably quite horrific - my gradients are steeper than is generally recommended and I have a gradient just acouple of coach-lengths from a diamond crossing -but again strangely, seeing how many rules I have broken - it seems to work ... most of my locos can happily haul four-five coach sets up with no problem (although the little 0-4-0 I bought for £2 as a track tester - it is so light it bounces off anything not perfectly flat and true) has a wee bit of trouble.
Now the section is up, and running, maybe I'll reinforce it a bit more before cloaking it in scenery and tunneldom. I'll post some photos if a) I can work out how and
I feel brave enough to ride out the slings and arrows which will inevitably follow.
As an aside, can someone elaborate on this L-girder system I have heard modellers talk so much of?
 

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QUOTE (Mike H. @ 11 Jan 2009, 12:32) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>As an aside, can someone elaborate on this L-girder system I have heard modellers talk so much of?

Mike

Have a look at this link- It provides an excellent description of 'L' girder construction techniques.

L girder info

Mike
 

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QUOTE (Mike H. @ 2 Dec 2008, 21:55) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Wondering how other people have done this. My layout contains a fairly long section of elevated track. To carry it I basically bodged a 'system' using thin ply for the trackbed, topped with cork tile, battened underneath by a strip of 1" x 1/4" timber, the whole thing built in strips and glued/nailed together. Then the trackbed held aloft by pairs of timber struts. I've found that this 'works' insofar as I have managed to create a fairly sound trackbed with gentle gradients and plenty of flexibility. What have other people done?

This is how I've done it:

http://www.mrol.com.au/Viaduct.aspx

You can also see the final result in the YouTube videos here:

http://www.mrol.com.au/DCCSoundClass50.aspx

Note that the gradient of all slopes is a prototypical 1 in 1 and a half. Steeper than this and real soil-based slopes will slip.

Graham Plowman
 

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tonydaly,
I love your tivio dale station, was this a kit or scratch built?
Steve
 

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QUOTE (wolverton bloomer @ 23 Jan 2009, 16:33) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>tonydaly,
I love your tivio dale station, was this a kit or scratch built?
Steve

Hi Steve.
It was scratch built some years ago by whom I don't know. I bought it about a year ago off E-Bay.Its a good copy of the origional near Stockport now demolished.
 
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