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Just another modeller
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QUOTE (Doug @ 5 Feb 2008, 20:10) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Thanks for the review Martin. I see that resistors are supplied with the kit. The specs on the Flicker Free unit say that with an output 4.7 volts resistors are not needed. Why are they used then? For protection or to reduce the intensity a bit?

**Hi Doug

The Prototype white/Golden white LEDs can be a little bright in the more traditional coaches, especially when half a dozen are used, and so using the the resistors gives the overall light quality a softer and more natural look as you will agree I think if you review a couple of Martins images.

They also current limit a little more so the overall "time on" will be slightly longer. (full charge takes several minutes, but then they will be on and bright for many minutes!)

One thing not pointed out in the review by the way:

The flicker free works equally well with AC(Marklin) DC conventional control and DCC - and can simply be added to a hornby pullman for example so the lights will never flicker, and will stay on in a station when the train is stopped even on a non-DCC layout.

It will fit N scale and work on large scale equally well.... its tolerant of "low to 20 volts".

Richard
DCCconcepts
 

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Just another modeller
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QUOTE (TimP @ 13 Feb 2008, 04:36) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>What did the kit cost?

The DCC concepts website doesn't mention it or a price.

Thanks

TimP

Hi Tim

A direct question so I guess its OK to answer direct

6 pack (FF6) is $A99, 3 pack is $A54 + post. They are also available ex UK from Bromsgrove models and Euroscale models. Sorry the website isn't updated - we are working on it but there are only so many hours in the day!

Richard
DCCconcepts
 

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Just another modeller
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Hello Barry

We've installed Flickefree in the Maunsells and they come out very well indeed. When you decide to do it, decide first whetheryou would like a realistic light level or a slightly brighter result - for a realistic level the 1.8mm Micro dot LEDs are perfect, for a slightly brighter look, the 3mm LEDs - we supply the kit with a choice of either.

Richard
 

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*** Martin has given you exactly the right answer there.

Basically if you ever mix two types of LED in the same circuit, each must have its OWN resistor. As Martin said, that is because one has a lower power requirement than the other which results in one getting all and the other geting none.

When each has its own resistor in what is effectively two separate circuits in parralel, then each gets what it needs and they coexist really well.

Re using with no resistor with the red. If you do that you will not get the flickerfree result you are looking for and you may well kill the LED.ALWAYS use a resistor as per the instructions.

***As Martin has indicated the NEW flickerfree is now shipping and it has switching via a single function wire when used on DCC. As a special bonus this feature does something neat for DC users too.... It works of course to give DC modellers constant lighting, but as a very special NEresult....If you connect that "control wire" to either side of the pickups, you will get directional constant lighting for your loco lights!

there is a VERY full set of instructions for the NEW flickerfree with many images and diagrammes at

http://www.dccconcepts.com/PDF_Downloads/f...nstructions.pdf

Kind regards and all the best for the new year to all MRF members

Richard
 

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***It needs only the one control wire. No second or return is normally needed. If you use forward or reverse light function (white or yellow) remember that they are directional so you will need to re-configure them to be on both ways.

Yes, you could link multiple carriages to one decoder function.

regards

Richard
 

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****Huw

re your last question, No I have never seen that. There is no need for matching as the LED production process is very consistent in the way it creates the LED elements. Without that consistency they would never be acceptable for production electronics work.

Your problems weren't because of differences in same coloured LEDS. Its never going to be an issue with anything on a PCB or a smaller project. You could make it happen with an inadvertent dry or poor soldered joint (resistive) and differing wire lengths which therefore have different resistance/voltage drop.

I have actually come across this with a flickerfree installation that wouldn't work for the owner - two LED didn't work and the f/free effect wasn't right either... I just re-heated and cleaned up all the joints and hey presto, it worked properly!

In a perfect world the rule is one resistor per LED but thats not always really practical. Parralel circuits can happily use a single resistor and often do but as I stated above, each colour needs its own circuit and if that is not possible, its own resistor. In practical terms for modellers one colour per circuit is the best approach. That means for example, for a three light colour light signal, 3 resistors.

Richard
 
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