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Hi,

A bit of a vague question but I'll do my best to explain.

When wiring the power to a DCC layout there are two options that I know of, using a BUS, where you run a loop of power under the baseboard and put feeders onto the track, or when you split the power into blocks and use boosters on each block.

Does anyone have any advice on which is best/easiest for a medium size layout?

Thanks,
Andrew.
 

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Put "DCC BUS" into the search box and see what comes up. We have had quite a few discussions about it.

There is a rambling topic here - with pictures down the page.

Drop feeders from each piece of flexi-track. Start with one command station. When using one command center, this is what the BUS looks like:


When you need the extra amps, add a booster. When using multiple boosters, each booster block will have a BUS:


Adding a booster creates another power district which can be used for more trains. Split your BUS between the boosters and you're done.

Dropping feeders from each piece of track may seem like a lot of work, but you can add feedback modules later with ease and as you see, you can break up the layout electrically without having to cut track once it's laid.

Note: the track pieces are all isolated from each other by using plastic rail joiners. See below:
 

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QUOTE (Sir Galahad @ 25 Jan 2008, 22:23) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi,

A bit of a vague question but I'll do my best to explain.

When wiring the power to a DCC layout there are two options that I know of, using a BUS, where you run a loop of power under the baseboard and put feeders onto the track, or when you split the power into blocks and use boosters on each block.

Does anyone have any advice on which is best/easiest for a medium size layout?

Thanks,
Andrew.

They're both variations on a theme. If you use multiple boosters then each booster is still wired to its bit of the layout by a bus. You would never use a booster on each "block", as in DC block control terms, that's way OTT.

Each booster supplies a "power district" so one power district might be the up line and another the down line or split it by main and branch or main and fiddle yard, etc, etc. The number of boosters you need really comes down to how much current you need to supply to the layout in the worst case. If it's too much for one booster then you need to consider how the layout is operated to split load more or less evenly between the boosters under normal conditions.

Andrew Crosland
 
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