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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rather than continually hi-jack the Pendolino thread with Eurostar questions I thought I would try and put my mind at rest by posing this question in it's own right.

So, if EPS have got rid of all their locos that are capable of hauling a dead Eurostar what do they use to haul a dead Eurostar, I'm just intrigued.

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There were plans for 2 66 style locos to act as thunderbirds in emergancies, but not sure whats happened with that plan now.

If its just got a problem then it can probably 'limp' somewhere out the way where it can be rescued later on (After all it should have plenty of power to move it even if 1 half set is dead). OHLE faults tend to be rare so not sure what they would do in that case (Allthough i think they may still have the barrier vehicles so it could be dragged in an emergancy by a 66 or pair of 67s).
 

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QUOTE OHLE faults tend to be rare so not sure what they would do in that case

Didn't one of these happen at the Callais end of the tunnel a few months back? They left the train where it was for the duration of the repair (~4 hours) and the passengers started to bake slowly in the carriages. A most distressing experience I believe.

David
 

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Ah yes - They sent a copule of the diesels to assist to drag it out the tunnel but those failed en route i think (If thats the right incident i'm thinking off???).

PS: The diesels i am referring to are those which are designed to work in the tunnel on engineers trips and don't venture out of the channel tunnel operating area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE (alastairq @ 21 Nov 2007, 19:35) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>perhaps a couple of 08s with a fancy paint job?

Won't be MUCH slower than the other options?

Surely they would use 09s - they have a higher top speed........

The thought of a pair of 09's in EPS livery "thundering" into St Pancras with a full length Eurostar in tow would be entertaining to say the least!

BTW Alastair why no mention of steeplecabs recently?

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QUOTE (Jennings @ 21 Nov 2007, 18:59) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Ah yes - They sent a copule of the diesels to assist to drag it out the tunnel but those failed en route i think (If thats the right incident i'm thinking off???).

PS: The diesels i am referring to are those which are designed to work in the tunnel on engineers trips and don't venture out of the channel tunnel operating area.
These are the ones you're talking about.

EuroTunnel diesel.
 

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QUOTE (pedromorgan @ 22 Nov 2007, 12:17) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>they have barrier vehicles but i suppose there is now no reason why they cant use the le shuttle tri-Bo's. the whole line is to continental loading gauge.

Peter
They are designed as permanently coupled dedicated locos, too specialised I would imagine?

As Eurostars consist of two half sets with independent power, a certain amount of redundancy is built in.
A failed unit would remain powered by the other half. Mechanical failure preventing movement would be another matter, but would equally apply to any train.
A failure in the tunnel that meant the train was stuck, would probably lead to splitting the set with passengers being moved into the working half. Other than that it may be an evacuation? I believe they periodically rehearse this?

Could it be that reliabilty figures demonstrate that dedicated "Thunderbirds" along HS1 are not required?
 

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QUOTE (Oakydoke @ 22 Nov 2007, 14:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>As Eurostars consist of two half sets with independent power, a certain amount of redundancy is built in.
A failed unit would remain powered by the other half. Mechanical failure preventing movement would be another matter, but would equally apply to any train.
A failure in the tunnel that meant the train was stuck, would probably lead to splitting the set with passengers being moved into the working half. Other than that it may be an evacuation? I believe they periodically rehearse this?

Could it be that reliabilty figures demonstrate that dedicated "Thunderbirds" along HS1 are not required?

The Eurostar is indeed built as two independent half-trains, and I think one is able to haul or propel the other dead on the steepest gradient. However loss of traction power would cripple the whole train.

I presume the reason the existing rescue locomotives are no longer used is that they lack the signalling equipment to run onto the high speed line. The French have some diesels with this equipment but as far as I know there are none in the UK. So I don't know what would happen in the event of a traction power failure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
QUOTE (Oakydoke @ 22 Nov 2007, 13:36) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>These are the ones you're talking about.

EuroTunnel diesel.

These look remarkably like ex NS or SNCB locos, is that the case?

QUOTE (Edwin @ 22 Nov 2007, 14:40) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I presume the reason the existing rescue locomotives are no longer used is that they lack the signalling equipment to run onto the high speed line.[/qoute]

That would make sense - it wouldn't be cost effective to modernise them.

The French have some diesels with this equipment but as far as I know there are none in the UK. So I don't know what would happen in the event of a traction power failure.

What happened to the French electrics that used to work through?

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I'm not sure if this is true or not but someone did tell me that the cost of reequipping thunderbird locos with the equipment neccessary to run on HS1 was concidered too high in relation to the amount of times the locos would ever be needed and as already mentioned only a complete power failure would stop a train in which case the whole line would close untill this was fixed
 

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The no go of dedicated thunderbirds would all most certainly have been the cost - 2 locos built to essentially a different design from everything else would be costly just because they would be specialist and the odds of another company ordering any would be slim.

QUOTE These are the ones you're talking about.

EuroTunnel diesel.

Yes those are the ones i was on about - They were built specially for the tunnel by the sounds of things (Small bit of info here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurotunnel_Class_0001 ).
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So it could be fun when a Javelin breaks down then.

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whilst on the topic of buses....why is it, that when today's train services collapse, and buses are run between stations...do the railcos hire the scrappiest, most untidy, scruffy old heaps they can find?

Are the railcos seriously afraid of using the biger companies, with the fine, comfortable vehicles?

In case the rail passenger suddenly realises, the bus is in fact more convenient?

[when I worked on the buses, the railcos were insistant we did NOT drop passengers off at convenient[for them] points....but took them all the way past their homes, to the station!......we used to activley canvass for passengers on these occasions....hoping to 'pinch custom' from the competing trains.]
 

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QUOTE when I worked on the buses, the railcos were insistant we did NOT drop passengers off at convenient[for them] points....but took them all the way past their homes, to the station!

That's still the way /and/ if the train was not scheduled to stop at a particular station, the bus won't stop there either! The instance I witnessed was a Reading / Bedwyn replacement service where a passenger wanted to get off at Aldermaston station but the train service was not scheduled to stop there. Our driver said no. If you look at a map you will notice that the railway line is actually a long walk from Aldermaston village but less than 50 yards from the A4 which our road vehicle was using. After arguing the toss for a mile or so, the bus driver relented and pulled in to let the guy off. This was quite a late night service as I remember.

David
 
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