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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I wonder if anyone knows whether the Card Kit of Didcot Coaling stage,that used to be advertised in the modelling magazines is still available?
I have not seen any reference to it for a while now.
But would be interested in purchasing a kit if someone can help with any information.

Wurzel
 

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Metcalfe do a Coal Stage - Red Brick, could this be the one you mean? And although I don't know the Didcot coaling stage, Hornby in their Skaledale range are to produce this year a 'Coal Drop' (and approach ramps) which has a vaguely GWR look.
Hope this may be of help,
Regards,
John Webb
 

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Hi Wurzel,

The Metcalf kit does look GWR type with a tub on rails for filling the loco. The kit number is PO222, its in red brick, I can't remember if Didcot is the same.

Regards Bizerba
 

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Didcot's is brown brick like most GWR buildings i've seen with a yellow water tank on top, similar size and shape to the Metcalfe kit but fairly different. Here's a photo of it from my last trip to Didcot

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi,
Sorry for the delay in replying to the posts!!
But the day after posting my original query,I left the country on company buisness and returned a couple of days ago.

I have just been searching through some old editions of British Railway Modelling from 1993 and have found the very advertisment I was looking for.
The kits were produced by a company known as U.C.D. of Bristol,and were marketed as Centrepiece buildings.
Does anyone know if this company still trades?

Once again sorry for the delay in my reply.
Thanks,
wurzel
 

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QUOTE (pedromorgan @ 4 Apr 2007, 22:01) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>i remember seeing a plaster model of a fairly decent coaling stage. i cant remember who it was made buy.

the didcot coaling stage is pretty big. i think it might dominate a layout.

Peter
Townstreet do a plaster one which is quite realistic. I think Ozzie bought one recently.
 

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I've seen one on a mates layout a few years back in South Africa, that one was cast one in some type of resin. As the person concerned was elderly and not in good health it's highly unlikely he's not around any more. But they did exist in kit form of that I'm positive. Swop meet and E bay would be my best suggestion.
Perhaps if you approached town street they might cobble something up.
 

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Not yet and it's an LMS Cenotaph. To many other things to get yet.

Ozzie21

QUOTE (neil_s_wood @ 5 Apr 2007, 08:43) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Townstreet do a plaster one which is quite realistic. I think Ozzie bought one recently.
 

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This is an old post and I don't know if it is still live. But, here goes.
I am modelling GWR in the mid to late 50's.
I believe the coaling stage at Didcot is very representative of GWR coaling and watering stages.
I recently took possession of a Bachmann Coaling Stage. I must say it is the best model I've come across. It is very solid (it weighs 860g (12oz)) and appears very authentic to the one photographed at Didcot.

My question is - How did this thing work?
I think I read it was manually operated.
My guess is that the wagons of coal were pushed up an incline, by an engine, to a level where the rails were about level with the pull down chute. Maybe there was a level bit and three or four wagons were pushed up there daily and moved along manually by the coaling crew as needed during the day rather than have an engine standing by to move the wagons 6 feet every hour or so.
Then the coal was manually off loaded onto some sort of trolley on rails. This trolley is then pushed out to the end of the chute and uplifted into the tender of the engine below.
If my design is correct then the present model will require a pair of rails, a trolley which can be upended at the end of the rails, and some sort of a block so that the over energetic trolley pushers don't push it right into the engine tender.

I would appreciate some help to make this model look the read thing.
 

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I've seen a picture inside a GWR coaling stage - possibly the Dicot one - but can't remember where I saw it, alas! The tubs are on plain wheels and the coaling stage has metal 'flaps' ('Draw-bridge' style) which are edged with angle iron which guides the tub wheels. The end of the angle iron is bent upwards through 120+ degrees so that the front wheels are held firmly when the tub is upended to empty the coal.
The GWR used this type of coaling stage because the Welsh steam coal they favoured was soft in character and dis not like being dropped from any height.

Regards,
John Webb
 

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Hi,
When I came back to railway modelling in '05 one of the layout plans I worked on was based on Didcot - in N gauge because of the space required, very little compromise would have been needed with the Didcot site and an adjacent double track would have allowed modern stock and steam specials to loop past in 'watching the trains go by' fashion.
A book that continues to be well thumbed is OPC's An Historical Survey of Great Western Engine Sheds 1947 by E Lyons containing scale plans for the major structures, 1947 shed allocations and site diagrams as well as a description of locomotive preparation.
Subsequently Model Rail for July '06 had a Chris Leigh article on scratchbuilding the coaling stage at Slough, working from two photo's he'd taken there around 1970 and a number of other shots of Didcot - including a photo by Ben Jones looking inward at the interior's "smooth iron floor" where the tubs are loaded off the coal wagons.
I've retained my interest and prompted by this revived topic I've had a bit of an image search, here are some flickr interior shots, looking outwards:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dfluff/116005...in/photostream/
clearly showing the 'hooked' ends to the metal 'flaps' referred to by John Webb.
...and:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tyomitch/2904...57607329318589/
with two conventional tubs for filling tenders...
...and one from outside:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tyomitch/2905...57607329318589/
The tub on this one narrows towards the front, for use loading bunkers on tank engines rather than tenders.

I abandoned the layout plan because I wouldn't have been happy posing existing N gauge steam loco's 'on shed', the new Ixion Manor would have been the standard I'd have been looking for had I pursued that project, and we still haven't got that with the current r-t-r Kings/Castles/Halls in N


Regards, Gerry.
 

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I suppose this is related.
How did GWR organize ash removal. I have seen LMS Coaling and ash towers but nothing for GWR.
Maybe it was just done manually. Engines dropped their ashes on specially created parts of the running yards and then the ash was manually shovelled into wagons.
Your help would be appreciated.
 

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GWR .Ash clearing.
This may help to explain how a loco came on to shed.
Once a loco had finished its turn it would run light back to the shed, if the loco was need the next day it would go to the coaling stage and be filled with coal and water.
Drivers used to give the coal stage loaders a few pence ,so the would not end up with large lump of coal ,make life a lot easier not having to hammer coal in to smaller lumps.
Once the loco had been coaled and watered, the train crew would hand over the loco over to the shed duty driver, who would then take the loco over to the ash pit.
The loco would move on to the ash pit and drop its fire, ash crews would hose down the ash, once the loco had move off.
Ash pits where usually right next to the coaling stage, loco did not drop their ash in the shed pits, you would get a fine if you did this.
Their would be a ash crew working in this area ,sometimes working the coal stage , the ash crews would shovel the ash in to barrows and then take the barrow over to the ash truck ,this truck had ash only written on it and was use solely for this job.
It was a hard back braking job to do and as they where paid by the ton, they would try to get as much tonnage as possible. The ash crew where on of the lowest paid in the shed, they where paid by the ton!
The shed would have cleaners working on the ash pits, had to be one of the messiest job on shed!
At old oak Common in 1951 an Irish worker shifted 30 tons in a day!, once the ash truck was full it would be taken away, the ash was not wasted as it would be used to form the ground work in sidings and sheds ,yards are not made from ballast ,but yard ash.
This is a very good book on GWR sheds, goes into a lot of detail on daily life in a shed, and also has track plans for the layout of GWR sheds.
Hope you have found this helpful
All the best
Darren

Great Western Railway Engine Sheds: London Division by by Chris Hawkins (Author), George Reeve (Author)
 

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Hi,
As Darren says, the ash pit is located on the line next to the coaling stage away from the running shed. An ash shelter was added during WWII to mask the glow of discarded firebox coal - it must have made the work even harder - the shelter would have covered both the pit road and the one next to it. The drawing in the Lyons book giving dimensions of 125' x 32' overall.
In this photo you can see standpipes and hoses between the two lines.

Regards, Gerry.
 

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HI All
I see that C+L are doing a coaling stage just like the one at Didcot ,it will be comming out later this year.
All the best
Darren
 

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Hi,
QUOTE (Torrington @ 20 May 2010, 01:06) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I see that C+L are doing a coaling stage just like the one at Didcot ,it will be comming out later this year.
Just noticed this photo on Nigel Burkin's website, very nice - can't af-ford to di-ver-sif-y...


Regards, Gerry.
 
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