Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
8,604 Posts
Additional to the above, every model with a DCC decoder in it is only a 12V DC model that has had a decoder added in the circuit from rails to motor. So it can become a DC model very quickly. This can be very simple, unplug decoder, insert blanking plug - if the model version was sold as 'DCC ready' (which means supplied with a socket to take a DCC decoder) this is likely what you will find.

If it is a DIY conversion which in N gauge typically means modification to the circuit, best left alone, as the quality of the work can be very variable.
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
8,604 Posts
I believe the loco's box has "6 DCC" on it so I am assuming it was DCC from new ?
I would read that as 'DCC ready' meaning only that it has a decoder socket installed, ( which is a 6 pin type ) so it was produced and sold as a DC loco. This leaves the choice of decoder to the owner.

Next question, does the vendor mention that a DCC decoder has been installed? If not then it's a DC loco.
If a decoder has been installed, then this is easily removed, and with the blanking plug in the socket, it's a DC loco again.

For completeness:
If sold with a decoder installed by the manufacturer then it would have 'DCC fitted' on the box.
If sold with a sound decoder installed by the manufacturer then it would have 'DCCsound' on the box
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
8,604 Posts
So would it be OK to use Relcos on a DCC ready loco which hadn't actually been converted to DCC ?
In principle yes, as it is a 12V DC loco.

Personally I wouldn't use a device of this sort on the size of motors in N gauge product, because it cannot discriminate between loss of conduction at railhead and commutator; and I believe many small motors now use a fine metal wiper on the commutator, rather than the much more tolerant piece of copper carbon.
 

·
In depth idiot
Joined
·
8,604 Posts
A DC loco should have a capacitor across the motor terminals, and this will shunt the high frequency from the Relco preventing it from damaging the motor. ...
Side note, unrelated to OP's question.

I note your 'should'. Are the capacitors in current RTR product effective? Sourced as cheaply as possible, I suspect their primary purpose is to be a visibly present component for compliance.

I give all new locos a couple of hours test on DC before a decoder is installed, and this last dozen years have seen a high proportion of capacitors fail in that time. (This is with RTR OO, but the UK N product is all coming out of the same manufacturing system.)

What I haven't done is systematically put the DMM on the capacitor(s) before DC test running, and also checked that it is actually in circuit, because for a DCC operation it's a redundant component. Considering the incidence of flaky connections found in RTR model circuits, it's a fair bet that some capacitors are 'incapacitated' through lack of connection...
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top