Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
If the decoder has the D.C. mode activated yes, but I never found it that reliable or very good actually.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
DCC fitted locos will often work better on DC than unfitted locos for a few reasons. These things will often be better:-

1. The lights work at proper brightness all the time.
2. You will get inertia built in to the loco (no need for an inertia controller).
3. Less likely to stall when running slowly.
4. No need to fit a decoder when you convert to DCC.

This is all conditional of course on the decoder that is fitted being any good, and that DC mode is enabled, and that you don't have a fancy PWM controller which can cause problems (a pure simple regulated DC controller is best). I would recommend that you buy the loco, and if you have trouble with it on DC get an inexpensive DCC controller (like a Bachmann E-Z Command for example) and see how it goes with that. An adequate DCC controller costs a lot less than a good DC controller.
.1. I am not sure the lights would work at full brightness all the time, with a DC controller through a decoder you are still only putting a few volts through to make it move, the same (if not less) volts than would be required on D.C. without a decoder fitted.

.2. Why? Unless the Loco has a stay alive fitted, and I am not even sure that a stay alive would work as well running on D.C.

Not wishing to be confrontational it’s just that are my impressions if running DC on a DCC fitted Loco, I cannot see how you can fool physics.

If indeed your correct it sounds to good to be true, but happy to see it work that way for sure (y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
My observations on this:

1. This depends on the decoder, some do, some don't.
2. DCC decoders have voltage controls built in to tightly control the voltage supplied to a motor. These are based on the principal of dropping the voltage from a higher voltage. You can never get more voltage out than you put in. So while a DC controller drops the track voltage, the decoder will be trying to maintain the voltage to the motor, but won't be able to due to insufficient track voltage. You are likely to get a conflict here with undesirable/uncontrollable behaviour.
3. This is not true. The DC track voltage is dropping off, so the effect will be exactly the same as it is for normal DC operation with no decoder fitted: it is more likely to stall due to continuity issues between rail/wheel with low voltages
4. That is true because the loco will already have a decoder fitted.

My suggestion is: don't bother running DCC fitted locos on DC. They will never exhibit their full functionality to its potential, therefore, running on DC is always going to result in disappointment. Move to DCC and you won't look back!
Sorry, my quote on note .2. should have been .3. I couldn’t see how less stalling would be possible, quite correct.

I still don’t get how the lights running on a DCC Loco supplied with a D.C. voltage would work from zero volts, or even at a few volts for example when crawling along, you still need enough volts to gets the lights to illuminate, with DCC you have 16V or so to play with (or the decoder does) so lamps are bright at standstill.

I get the LEDs only require a very small current to operate, but the decoder needs those volts to operate as wel……if it ain’t there, it ain’t there.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top