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I am asking please for information on goods train make up on the DRG. I gather from the previous posts that there were usually bremserhaus wagons distributed through the train, the number depending on the nature of the train and terrain. Was there an equivalent of the guard, and what did he ride in ? Was there always a guterpackwagen in freight trains, or sometimes more than one, and where in the train were they placed ? I also understand there was always one first coach on a passenger train. Did any particular wagon bring up the rear ? Any info or links will be gratefully received. Thanks, Andrew
 

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Hi Andrew,

Freight trains
The freight train baggage car was generally located between the locomotive and the freight wagons. Notionally it was for the train conductor to ride in with the documentation, but I believe that it also could carry small items of freight as well. Not that this is for significant lines ie Stuttgart to Helbron, as opposed to minor branch lines.

Passenger trains
There was a regulation that a none revenue passenger carrying wagon had to be placed between the Locomotive and the passenger cars. While generally this was a baggage car the Stettin type box car was built also for this requirement.

While not common some trains ran with the baggage car at the end of the train, while some trains (very few in reality) had baggage cars at each end.

There was no requirement for a train to have a first class section. Comparatively speaking there were not many coaches with first class section. By far the most numerous were the AB 4u type followed by the ABC 4u and lastly the A4u.

As for the last wagon on the train there was no fixed rule. However the last wagon in a passenger train going from Stuttgart to Rome via Munich, the last wagon in the train departing Stuttgart could be the first wagon (behind the locomotive and the baggage car in the train departing Munich for Rome.

I have a picture of a branch line train that has 2 open wagons (one 15t the other 20t) a post van and three passenger coaches. I also have another picture that shows another branch line train with freight wagons at both ends and passenger coaches in between!

Hope this helps a bit.

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
[quote name='john woodall' date='16 Oct 2008, 15:49' post='64347']
Hi Andrew,

Freight trains
The freight train baggage car was generally located between the locomotive and the freight wagons. Notionally it was for the train conductor to ride in with the documentation, but I believe that it also could carry small items of freight as well. Not that this is for significant lines ie Stuttgart to Helbron, as opposed to minor branch lines.

Passenger trains
There was a regulation that a none revenue passenger carrying wagon had to be placed between the Locomotive and the passenger cars. While generally this was a baggage car the Stettin type box car was built also for this requirement.

While not common some trains ran with the baggage car at the end of the train, while some trains (very few in reality) had baggage cars at each end.

There was no requirement for a train to have a first class section. Comparatively speaking there were not many coaches with first class section. By far the most numerous were the AB 4u type followed by the ABC 4u and lastly the A4u.

As for the last wagon on the train there was no fixed rule. However the last wagon in a passenger train going from Stuttgart to Rome via Munich, the last wagon in the train departing Stuttgart could be the first wagon (behind the locomotive and the baggage car in the train departing Munich for Rome.

I have a picture of a branch line train that has 2 open wagons (one 15t the other 20t) a post van and three passenger coaches. I also have another picture that shows another branch line train with freight wagons at both ends and passenger coaches in between!

Hope this helps a bit.

John

Thanks John, thats very helpful. I would like to ask though if the man in the parcel wagon behind the engine have anything to do with the braking or was that done by separate staff ? I presume from your notes above that the parcels traffic was more important on branch and minor lines or did I misunderstand ? Andrew
 

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QUOTE (billericaybill @ 16 Oct 2008, 16:34) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Thanks John, thats very helpful. I would like to ask though if the man in the parcel wagon behind the engine have anything to do with the braking or was that done by separate staff ? I presume from your notes above that the parcels traffic was more important on branch and minor lines or did I misunderstand ? Andrew

German trains had (and still have) air brakes.
 

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Hi Andrew,

Not that I have definitive proof of this but by the start or the DRG all wagons had break lines, but not necessarily brakes or air brakes. So it is conceivable that on some trains there would still have been a need for brakemen on the train. The DRG in the 1920's was the worlds largest employer and there are recorded instances where brakeman froze to death in the brakeman's cabins in winter. They were literally wooden boxes.

As for the baggage car they did have brakes and were used as part of the normal brakes on the train.

I really am unsure how much freight was carried in a baggage car. I would not have thought it was a great deal. In terms of branch line passenger trains it was probably more than branch line freight trains. For express trains, I would conclude that it was more luggage than freight.

Hope this helps.

John
 
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